• Korsha Wilson on Story in the Public Square

    You are what you eat with Korsha Wilson

    Air Dates: November 17-18, 2018

    “You are what you eat” is an expression every grade school student has heard—either as a boast or as a taunt. Guest, Korsha Wilson says that “what we eat, what we cook, and the meals we share can tell us a lot about race, access, privilege, heritage, and culture.”

    Korsha Wilson writes about food, food media, race, class and more.

    “I’m especially fascinated by how all of those things intersect and play out in restaurant spaces. I also host a weekly podcast on Heritage Radio Network called ‘A Hungry Society’.”

    Korsha Wilson

    Heritage Radio network, heritageradionetwork.org, describes itself as: “HRN is the world’s pioneer food radio station. The studio broadcasts live from two recycled shipping containers inside Roberta’s Pizza, an innovative restaurant at the epicenter of Brooklyn’s culinary renaissance. We run 100% on the support of our diverse community of members and partners.”

    Wilson’s work has been published in The New York TimesBon Appétit, The Boston Globe, Eater, Saveur, Taste, Boston Magazine, Village Voice, Munchies, Civil Eats, and Yes!. She is a graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and spent two years in journalism school at Emerson College before deciding to follow her passion for restaurants, food, and writing. She has also worked as a line cook, server, manager, and hostess in fine dining restaurants.

    Her philosophy perhaps is best summarized in her June 27 article for Yes!, “Cooking Stirs the Pot for Social Change: Preparing food — and letting others in our communities cook for us — is how we become good citizens who engage with the communities around us.”

    “Every time we step to our stoves to make a meal we’re engaging with the society around us. Each ingredient that we use, every technique, every spice tells a story about our access, our privilege, our heritage, and our culture. The foods and dishes we consume are all part of larger forces that impact our lives. Our appetites and what we crave are the result of our place in the world at that time.”

    Wilson has written about three cookbooks, Feed the Resistance, The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen, and The Immigrant Cookbook. They each show how the act of cooking can be a platform for social justice and social action.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Peter Asaro on Story in the Public Square

    Stopping Killer Robots with Peter Asaro

    Air Dates: November 10-12, 2018

    For decades, Hollywood films and science fiction writers have told us ominous stories about the future dangers of killer robots and artificial intelligence. Peter Asaro warns that machines lack the essential human qualities required for operating weapons systems—and he’s working to ban them from doing just that.

    Dr. Peter Asaro is a philosopher of science, technology and media. His work examines artificial intelligence and robotics as a form of digital media, the ethical dimensions of algorithms and data, and the ways in which technology mediates social relations and shapes our experience of the world.

    His current research focuses on the social, cultural, political, legal and ethical dimensions of robotics and artificial intelligence, from a perspective that combines media theory with science and technology studies. He has written widely-cited papers on lethal robotics from the perspective of just war theory and human rights. Dr. Asaro’s research also examines agency and autonomy, liability and punishment, and privacy and surveillance as it applies to consumer robots, industrial automation, smart buildings, and autonomous vehicles. His research has been published in international peer reviewed journals and edited volumes, translated into French, German, Korean and Braille, and he is currently writing a book that interrogates the intersections between advanced robotics, and social and ethical issues.

    Dr. Asaro has held research positions at the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton University, Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers University, the HUMlab of Umeå University in Sweden, and the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna. He has also developed technologies in the areas of virtual reality, data visualization and sonification, human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, artificial intelligence, machine learning, robot vision, and neuromorphic robotics at the National Center for Supercomputer Applications (NCSA), the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Iguana Robotics, Inc., and was involved in the design of the natural language interface for the Wolfram|Alpha computational knowledge engine for Wolfram Research–this interface is also used by Apple’s Siri and Microsoft’s Bing to answer math queries, and won two 2010 SXSW Web Interactive Awards for Technical Achievement and Best of Show.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • CSEU 2018

    Pell Center Brings Cybersecurity Awareness to the Forefront in US & Europe

    Newport, RI – For the fourth year in a row, the Pell Center joined the annual National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) campaign – a far-reaching awareness and education initiative about the importance of cybersecurity at home as well as in the workplace. Pell Center Senior Fellow Francesca Spidalieri spearheaded the initiative for the Pell Center as part of the ongoing Cyber Leadership Project and participated in multiple discussions and events in Europe and the United States.

    CSEU 2018While in Europe, Spidalieri was the guest speaker for the “Secure in Mind” podcast with host Nick Kelly. She spoke about the widening gap between the demand for cybersecurity talent and the supply of a professional workforce, and emphasized the need for strong female mentors to encourage more women to join this rewarding and highly-profitable field.  She also moderated a plenary session on “Attribution and Credible Response as Foundations of Cybersecurity” during the European Cybersecurity Forum (CYBERSEC) in Krakow, Poland – one of the largest public policy conferences in Europe dedicated to the strategic challenges of cybersecurity. The panel discussion featured world-renown cybersecurity experts and practitioners, including Chris Painter, former U.S. Cyber Ambassador; Alexander Klimburg, Director of the Cyber Policy and Resilience Program at Hague Centre for Strategic Studies and author of the best-selling book “The Darkening Web;” Ciaran Martin, CEO of the UK National Cyber Security Centre; Rafal Rohozinski, CEO of SecDev Group; Jarno Limnell, Professor of Cybersecurity at the Finnish Aalto University; and Partyk Pawlak, the Executive Director of the EUISS Brussels.

    PBN summitt panel

    In Rhode Island, she spoke at the Annual PBN Cybersecurity Summit, where she took part in the “Designing Cybersecurity’s Strategy: Moving from Detect and Defend to Predict and Prevent” panel and discussed how companies can develop better cybersecurity measures to prevent, mitigate, and respond to cyber threats and train their workforce to become their first line of defense.  She also joined Congressman Jim Langevin for his biannual

    Langevin & Manfra

    Cybersecurity Advisory Committee meeting, which featured DHS chief cybersecurity official Janette Manfra who spoke about the security of our electoral system and other critical infrastructure.  Finally, Francesca discussed election security and how to better secure states’ voter registration databases and voting machines in a special report on NBC 10 on “Hacking the Vote”; and hosted a half-day conference at the Pell Center on cybersecurity workforce development and awareness.

    The conference hosted at the Pell Center was part of the ongoing Rhode Island Corporate Cybersecurity Initiative (RICCI) – an effort designed to bring together senior leaders across various industries, including defense, financial services, technology, healthcare, energy, telecommunication, law enforcement, and academia, to discuss the most pressing cyber threats facing corporate and public sector leaders in the digital age; and promoting best practices to prevent, protect, mitigate, respond, and remediate cyber incidents. The Pell Center partnered with the Tech Collective – RI’s foremost information technology association – and with cybersecurity companies Anomali and Tevora for this year’s conference, titled “Educating for a Career in Cybersecurity & Raising Cybersecurity Awareness within your Organization.”

    Susan Peediyakkal

    The event helped shine a spotlight on the critical need to build a strong, cyber-secure workforce, address the cybersecurity skills gap, and encourage every workplace to create a culture of cybersecurity from the boardroom to the server room. Susan Peediyakkal, Cyber Threat Intelligence Program Lead Consultant at Booz Allen Hamilton, delivered a keynote address and discussed how the shortage of well-trained cybersecurity professionals continues to be a key risk to our economy and national security. She emphasized that inspiring the next generation of interested and capable cybersecurity professionals to better safeguard our ever-expanding cyber ecosystem must be the starting point to building stronger defenses. Ms. Peediyakkal’s also covered best practices for hiring, educating, and retaining highly sought-after cybersecurity professionals.

    Cyber Panel

    Spidalieri also moderated a panel discussion with cybersecurity experts from the engineering, legal, academic, consulting, and digital forensics fields, including O’Shea Bowens, CEO and Founder of Null Hat Security; Joe Provost, Computer Scientist & Professor at Salve Regina University; Linn Freedman, Principal at Robinson & Cole; Rick Norberg, CEO at Vertikal6; and Clayton Riness, Managing Director Threat Services at Tevora.

    Please visit the Rhode Island Corporate Cybersecurity Initiative (RICCI) webpage for more information on all our upcoming events.

    For additional information, contact Francesca Spidalieri, Pell Center Senior Fellow for Cyber Leadership.

     

  • Alan Lightman on Story in the Public Square

    The Battle Between Science & Spirituality with Alan Lightman

    Air Dates: November 3-5, 2018

    The tension between faith and reason is an ancient one, made even more distinct in the West by the scientific revolution that preceded the era of the Enlightenment. Alan Lightman is a scientist whose personal transcendent experience shapes his view of spirituality today.

    Alan Lightman is an American writer, physicist, and social entrepreneur. Born in 1948, he was educated at Princeton and at the California Institute of Technology, where he received a PhD in theoretical physics. He has received five honorary doctoral degrees. Lightman has served on the faculties of Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and was the first person at MIT to receive dual faculty appointments in science and in the humanities.

    He is currently professor of the practice of the humanities at MIT. His scientific research in astrophysics has concerned black holes, relativity theory, radiative processes, and the dynamics of systems of stars. His essays and articles have appeared in The Atlantic, Granta, Harper’s, the New Yorker, the New York Review of Books, Salon, and many other publications. His essays are often chosen by the New York Times as among the best essays of the year.

    Lightman is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also the founder of the Harpswell Foundation, a nonprofit organization whose mission is “to advance a new generation of women leaders in Southeast Asia.”

    Lightman is the author of six novels, several collections of essays, a memoir, and a book-length narrative poem, as well as several books on science. His novel, Einstein’s Dreams was an international bestseller and has been the basis for dozens of independent theatrical and musical adaptations around the world. His novel, The Diagnosis was a finalist for the National Book Award. His most recent books are The Accidental Universe, which was chosen by Brain Pickings as one of the 10 best books of 2014, and his memoir Screening Room, was chosen by the Washington Post as one of the best books of the year for 2016.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • John Kerry on Story in the Public Square

    Every Day is Extra with John Kerry

    Air Dates: October 27-29, 2018

    Over the last five decades, the United States has fought wars, worked for peace, achieved environmental breakthroughs, and struggled to pass on security—however, you might define that – to the next generation. More often, than not, you would have found guest, John Kerry in the middle of those fights.

    John Kerry is a visiting distinguished statesman at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he will focus on conflict resolution and global environmental challenges. He is also a distinguished fellow for global affairs at Yale University.

    On February 1, 2013, Kerry was sworn in as the 68th secretary of state of the United States. He became the first sitting U.S. secretary of state to meet with Iran’s foreign minister since the Iranian revolution. This meeting was the highest-level U.S. diplomatic contact with Iran in more than six years. Kerry was also a key architect of the Paris Climate Accord, signing the historic agreement to reduce carbon emissions in 2016.

    Prior to being nominated and sworn in as secretary of state, Kerry served for more than twenty-five years as a U.S. senator from Massachusetts. He eventually served on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee as chairman.

    In 2004, he was his party’s nominee for President, losing to incumbent President George W. Bush.

    Shortly before he graduated from Yale University, Kerry volunteered for service in the United States Navy. He completed two tours of duty in Vietnam, after which he began a lifelong fight for his fellow veterans as a co-founder of the Vietnam Veterans of America.

    His new candid memoir, Every Day is Extra, published by Simon and Schuster on September 4, 2018, is now a New York Times Bestseller.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Justin Hendrix on Story in the Public Square

    The Future of Media with Justin Hendrix

    Air Dates: October 20-22, 2018

    We live in a world awash with media of all types. If we’re honest, it seems like we have not yet mastered the current onslaught of social media in public life. Justin Hendrix warns that, for good or for bad, the future is coming.

    Justin Hendrix is Executive Director of NYC Media Lab, connecting media and tech companies with NYC universities to drive digital media innovation and entrepreneurship. Previously he was Vice President, Business Development & Innovation for The Economist. He holds a BA from the College of William & Mary and an MSc in Technology Commercialization from the McCombs School of Business, University of Texas at Austin. Follow him on Twitter @justinhendrix.

    Founded in 2010, NYC Media Lab is dedicated to driving innovation and ultimately job growth in media and technology by facilitating collaboration between the City’s universities and its companies. Comprised of a consortium including New York City Economic Development Corporation, School of Visual Arts, New York University, Columbia University, The New School, CUNY, IESE, and Pratt Institute, NYC Media Lab’s goals are to include generate research and development, knowledge transfer, and talent across all of the city’s campuses.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • John Kerry on live set of Story in the Public Square

    John Kerry tapes special episode of Story in the Public Square at Salve Regina University

    Jim Ludes, Sister Jane Gerety and John Kerry small

    Dr. James Ludes, Jane Gerety and Senator John Kerry in Ochre Court prior to the taping of Story in the Public Square at Salve Regina University, Newport.

    NEWPORT, R.I. – Silence filled the great hall of Ochre Court. The cameras rolled and the audience sat in hushed anticipation of the special guest. On October 10, former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry filmed a special edition episode of Story in the Public Square at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island. Salve Regina President Sister Jane Gerety gave the opening remarks welcoming the Secretary to the University.

    Hosted by Jim Ludes, Executive Director of the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy, and G. Wayne Miller, Senior Staff Writer at The Providence Journal, Story in the Public Square is a weekly 30-minute program that tries to make sense of the stories shaping public life in the United States.

    Upon answering the first question from Story in the Public Square co-host Jim Ludes, Kerry broke his stoicism. “Let me begin, first of all, by expressing and sharing the euphoria of the Red Sox victory last night,” he said, to much laughter and amusement of the audience.

    The episode focuses on Kerry’s new book, Every Day is Extra. “This one is a lot from the heart and from the gut,” Kerry said, “It’s honest and it’s optimistic.”

    As a young man in his college years, he was steered into public service by his experience with war. He recalled his earliest memory at age four walking through the rubble left by World War II in the streets of Paris holding his mother’s hand. Hearing the glass crunching under his feet, he realized this was because of war. He remembered friends going off to fight the Soviets and representatives sent from his school to support the civil rights movement. President Kennedy’s assassination and his own service in Vietnam showed him that each day we are lucky to be here. The title of his book is no exception.

    He has a fierce idealism and a hopefulness about America and American citizenship that resonated throughout the discussion.

    “How do we protect democracy and how do we sail forward?” asked Ludes.

    “Well, boats have a captain,” said Kerry. “We need a new captain.”

    John Kerry on Story in the Public Square

    Senator John Kerry, right, addresses questions from G. Wayne Miller, left, as they tape a segment of Story in the Public Square in Ochre Court, Salve Regina University, Newport.

    America is at a low point, he went on, but history unfolds like that: it ebbs and flows. Kerry was at the forefront of many initiatives in his early political days and urged young people to turn their aspirations into voting issues. Getting out there and doing something about it — that’s how things get done. We have to put people in Congress to solve these issues, he said.

    His advice to the students in the room?

    “We get another shot, the second shot is coming in twenty-seven days,” said Kerry, “call and ask what you can do to help.” The 2018 midterm election is Nov. 6.

    There is a great anger in the U.S. that is dividing the country day-to-day and breaking down democracy, Kerry said.  In order to restore it, he said, we the people must stand up and define it.

    “The only way to do it is to vote,” is how Kerry put it,

    During the question-and-answer portion, an audience member asked what Secretary Kerry thought was the most important thing that universities should be teaching their students. He explained how during his time in Vietnam, soldiers would more likely be ambushed than attack first. Yet in World War II on the beaches of Normandy, they marched straight to their death. Many of the men standing next to them were shot.

    “You knew when your life was going to end and you had to walk forward and fight for another country’s freedom” he said. “It’s that selfless extraordinary level of sacrifice. They should learn about responsibility and the meaning of citizenship.”

    John Kerry speaking to audience

    Senator John Kerry, right, addresses questions from G. Wayne Miller, left, and Dr. Jim Ludes as they tape a segment of Story in the Public Square in Ochre Court, Salve Regina University, Newport.

    The episode of Story in the Public Square featuring John Kerry will air on October 28, on Rhode Island PBS and four times during the weekend on SiriusXM’s P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

    Photos courtesy of Andrea Hansen 

     

  • Padma Venkatraman on Story in the Public Square

    Experiencing the World Through Reading with Padma Venkatraman

    Air Dates: October 13-15, 2018

    The stories we tell ourselves shape who we are, as individuals, and as a society. Padma Venkatraman is a novelist whose stories explore enduring themes about the use of violence to resist evil, the meaning of family, and tension between tradition and modernity.

    Multiple award-winning author Padma Venkatraman was born in Chennai, India. She came to the U.S. at the age of 19, and became an American citizen after earning a Ph.D. in oceanography from The College of William and Mary.

    Padma has worked as chief scientist on oceanographic ships, spent time under the sea, directed a school, and lived in 5 countries. Her 3 novels, A Time to Dance, Island’s End and Climbing the Stairs. Each novel received multiple starred reviews at the release, and received numerous honors and won several national and international awards. Padma gives keynote addresses, speaks on TV and radio, serves on panels, conducts workshops, has been the chief guest at international author festivals, and visits schools all over the world.

    She has written several other books, including: Double Stars: The Story of Caroline Herschel (Profiles in Science); Women Mathematicians (Profiles in Mathematics); and the illustrated Growing Gold and Cleverest Thief.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • NCSAM Champions

    Pell Center to Host Conference During National Cyber Security Awareness Month

    Newport, RI – For the fourth year in a row, the Pell Center is supporting the annual National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) campaign as a NCSAM Champion Organization.  This national effort aims to raise public awareness about the importance of cybersecurity and share useful resources through social media and various events across the country. The Pell Center is partnering with Anomali, Tech Collective, and Tevora to offer a half-day conference on Wednesday, October 17th on the growing market for cybersecurity jobs and the need to build a culture of cybersecurity across organizations.

    National Cyber Security Awareness Month LogoThe event will shine a spotlight on the critical need to build a strong, cyber-secure workforce, address the cybersecurity skills gap, and encourage every workplace to create a culture of cybersecurity from the boardroom to the server room. It will highlight how a well-trained and cyber-aware workforce can become the first (and best) line of defense for organizations of all sizes and in all sectors, and help them better protect themselves, their employees, and their customers against the most common cyber threats and mitigate, respond to, and recover from cyber incidents. It will also discuss careers in cybersecurity and ways to motivate young students, veterans, and individuals who are looking for a new career or re-entering the workforce to learn more about the field and seek highly fulfilling, well-paying and rewarding cybersecurity jobs.

    Pell Center Senior Fellow, and head of the Cyber Leadership Project, Francesca Spidalieri, organized and will moderate the conference. The event is part of the Rhode Island Corporate Cybersecurity Initiative (RICCI) – an ongoing effort designed to bring together senior leaders across various industries in order to discuss the most pressing cyber threats facing corporate and public sector leaders in the digital age and promoting best practices to prevent, protect, mitigate, respond, and remediate cyber incidents.

    Susan Peediyakkal, Cyber Threat Intelligence Program Lead Consultant at Booz Allen Hamilton, will deliver a keynote address on how the shortage of well-trained cybersecurity professionals continues to be a key risk to our economy and national security. Inspiring the next generation of interested and capable cybersecurity professionals to better safeguard our ever-expanding cyber ecosystem is a starting point to building stronger defenses. Ms. Peediyakkal’s talk will also cover best practices for hiring, educating, and retaining highly sought-after cybersecurity professionals.

    The keynote will be followed by a panel discussion with renown cybersecurity experts from the engineering, legal, academic, consulting, and digital forensics fields and will focus on how to foster a culture of cybersecurity and awareness within organizations and train employees on cybersecurity best practices. Panel members will include: O’Shea Bowens, CEO and Founder of Null Hat Security; Joe Provost, Computer Scientist & Professor at Salve Regina University; Linn Freedman, Principal at Robinson & Cole; Rick Norberg, CEO at Vertikal6; and Clayton Riness, Managing Director Threat Services at Tevora.

    Please visit the Rhode Island Corporate Cybersecurity Initiative (RICCI) webpage for more information on all our upcoming events and links to register.

    For additional information, contact Francesca Spidalieri, Pell Center Senior Fellow for Cyber Leadership.

     

  • Sandeep Jauhar on "Story in the Public Square"

    Heart: A History with Dr. Sandeep Jauhar

    Air Dates: September 29 – October 1, 2018

    We rely on physicians and the American healthcare industry to keep us healthy—and when we are gravely sick, we rely on them to keep us alive. Dr. Sandeep Jauhar has been on both sides of that equation, and his books give us an insight normally reserved for insiders.

    A practicing cardiologist, Jauhar has been writing regularly about medicine for The New York Times since 1998 and is currently a contributing opinion writer for the Times. Jauhar has written two medical memoirs, both published by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

    His latest book, Heart: A History, is a scientific history, as well as a personal story. It tells the colorful and little-known story of the doctors who risked their careers and the patients who risked their lives to know and heal our most vital organ. It will be published on September 18, 2018, in seven languages and a dozen countries. Heart: A History, is an Amazon Best of the Month for September, and One of Amazon’s Most Anticipated Fall Books

    From the publisher:

    “Deftly alternating between key historical episodes and his own work, Jauhar tells the colorful and little-known story of the doctors who risked their careers and the patients who risked their lives to know and heal our most vital organ. He introduces us to Daniel Hale Williams, the African American doctor who performed the world’s first open heart surgery in Gilded Age Chicago. We meet C. Walton Lillehei, who connected a patient’s circulatory system to a healthy donor’s, paving the way for the heart-lung machine. And we encounter Wilson Greatbatch, who saved millions by inventing the pacemaker―by accident. Jauhar deftly braids these tales of discovery, hubris, and sorrow with moving accounts of his family’s history of heart ailments and the patients he’s treated over many years. He also confronts the limits of medical technology, arguing that future progress will depend more on how we choose to live than on the devices we invent. Affecting, engaging, and beautifully written, Heart: A History takes the full measure of the only organ that can move itself.”

    His first book, Intern: A Doctor’s Initiation, published in 2009, was a national bestseller and was optioned by NBC for a dramatic television series. The book is Jauhar’s story of his days and nights in residency at a busy hospital in New York City, a trial that led him to question his every assumption about medical care today.

    His second book, Doctored: The Disillusionment of an American Physician, released in August 2014, was a New York Times bestseller and was named a New York Post Best Book of 2014. It was praised as “highly engaging and disarmingly candid” by The Wall Street Journal, “beautifully written and unsparing” by The Boston Globe, and “extraordinary, brave and even shocking” by The New York Times.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

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