• Sofie Karasek on Story in the Public Square

    End Rape on Campus co-founder Sofie Karasek talks #InMyWords Campaign

    Air Dates: May 26-28, 2018

    Sexual assaults happen on America’s college campuses more frequently than anyone wants to admit. This week’s guest is a victim of sexual assault herself. Sofie Karasek says it’s time to change that reality.

    Sofie Karasek is a co-founder of End Rape on Campus and the national organizer for the youth-led #InMyWords Campaign, to reimagine justice and healing for all sexual harm survivors and to fight for solutions at the scale of the problem.

    On her website, Karasek describes herself as “a progressive movement builder and organizer. When she was a 19-year-old at UC Berkeley, she co-founded the national non-profit End Rape on Campus, where she and a band of scrappy student survivors transformed campus rape from a PR blip to a national scandal, brought Yes Means Yes into the mainstream, and were branded as a “well-funded Death Star”. She was also featured in The Hunting Ground film and Lady Gaga’s 2016 Academy Awards performance.”

    “Sofie now trains other young organizers to harness the power of storytelling to ignite public support for progressive change. She is passionate about reimagining justice for sexual violence, transforming voting from a privilege to a right, and preventing the climate crisis from washing away the home she grew up in. (And convincing other Americans that Danish salty licorice is the best).”

    Her activism began in the wake of an assault. She described that start in a recent New York Times op-ed, which began: “I’ve told my story many times — I was assaulted, I reported it to my university, and it swept it under the rug. When I was 19, I helped create the wave of activism around the issue of campus sexual assault that made headlines from 2013 to 2016.”

    “The student movement during those years primed the public for #MeToo today: Survivors of sexual assault mobilized to end the stigma attached to it by telling our stories publicly. And, as is happening now, progress didn’t come without opposition…”

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Social Engineering

    Pell Center to Host New England’s 1st Social Engineering Conference

    It’s not just computers getting hacked: people are getting hacked too. More than 70% of all data breaches in the last year involved phishing or some other type of social engineering.1 That means that one of the weakest links in computer security is, well, us. Hackers are using these social engineering techniques to get passwords, credit card data, patient data and other personal information that we all look to protect.

    The Pell Center at Salve Regina University is hosting New England’s first social engineering conference on Saturday, June 16, 2018, to explore these attacks and their defenses.

    The full-day conference will bring together some of the best minds in the field of social engineering, including Christopher Hadnagy, author of “Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking.” The event will also feature:

    • Talks on “How to Rob a Bank Over the Phone” and “Social Engineering Your Way Into a Career”;
    • A panel with the winners of the “Social Engineering Capture the Flag” competition at the popular hacker conference DEF CON; and
    • Academic research on social engineering from Dr. Aunshul Rege, a professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University.

    The conference was created Lea Snyder and Rhode Island resident Patrick Laverty, who works in the cybersecurity industry helping companies find and fix their weaknesses. For more information about the conference, visit: http://se-ri.org.

    Purchase your ticket and RSVP here (FREE for Salve Regina students only).

     

    1 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report 2018: https://www.verizonenterprise.com/verizon-insights-lab/dbir/

  • Heather Ann Thompson

    The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 with Heather Ann Thompson

    Air Dates: May 19-21, 2018

    What’s the difference between a riot and an uprising? Your answer might have something to do with your perspective on the violence. Heather Ann Thompson looks at events at Attica State Prison in 1971 and draws a direct connection to the challenges America faces in its criminal justice system today.

    Dr. Heather Ann Thompson is a historian at the University of Michigan, and is the Pulitzer Prize and Bancroft Prize-winning author of Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy (Pantheon Books, 2016). Thompson is a public intellectual who writes extensively on the history of policing, mass incarceration and the current criminal justice system for The New York Times, Newsweek, Time, The Washington Post, Jacobin, The Atlantic, Salon, Dissent, NBC, New Labor Forum, The Daily Beast, and The Huffington Post, as well as for the top publications in her field. Her award-winning scholarly articles include: “Why Mass Incarceration Matters: Rethinking Crisis, Decline and Transformation in the Postwar United States,” Journal of American History (December 2010) and “Rethinking Working Class Struggle through the Lens of the Carceral State: Toward a Labor History of Inmates and Guards,” Labor: Studies in the Working Class History of the Americas (Fall, 2011). Thompson’s piece in the Atlantic Monthly on how mass incarceration has distorted democracy in America was named a finalist for a best magazine article award in 2014.

    On the policy front, Thompson served on a National Academy of Sciences blue-ribbon panel that studied the causes and consequences of mass incarceration in the U.S. The two-year, $1.5 million project was sponsored by the National Institute of Justice and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Thompson has served on the boards of several policy organizations including the Prison Policy Initiative, the Eastern State Penitentiary, a historic site, and on the advisory boards of Life of the Law and the Alliance of Families for Justice. She has also worked in an advisory capacity with the Center for Community Change, the Humanities Action Lab Global Dialogues on Incarceration, and the Open Society Foundation on issues related to her work.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows 2018-2019

    Nuala Pell Leadership Program Selects Fellows for 2018-2019

    Eleven rising juniors and seniors at Salve Regina University have been selected for an innovative leadership development program run by the Pell Center. Named in honor of the wife of U.S. Senator Claiborne Pell, the Nuala Pell Leadership Program builds student leaders for the twenty-first century.

    “I feel privileged to be working with such wonderful students,” said Martha McCann Rose, program director. “Through their future endeavors, they will continue to serve the public and change the world.”

    The 2018-2019 cohort of Nuala Pell Leadership Program fellows include:

    • Julia Arms, Nursing, Franklin, MA
    • Nicole Doucette, Elementary/Special Education, Tewksbury, MA
    • Jeffrey Evans, Environmental Studies/Sociology & Anthropology, Manchester, NH
    • Maria Hendrickson, Administration of Justice/Political Science, Wolfeboro, NH
    • Madeline Key, English Communications, Hanson, MA
    • Shannon Kelley, Nursing, Weymouth, MA
    • Kailyn Leary, Political Science/Philosophy, Freehold, NJ
    • Kali Major, Elementary/Special Education, Naugatuck, CT
    • Jennifer Page, American Studies, Ipswich, MA
    • Calissa Silva, History/Sociology & Anthropology, Stonington, CT
    • Krysta Tsangarides, Administration of Justice/Environmental Studies, Southington, CT

    The Nuala Pell Leadership Program includes monthly meetings where students explore leadership theory, ethics, evolution of public issues and what it takes to be a leader in the public sector. Each student will shadow a local leader involved in the public sector and reflect on their experience. In 2019, Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows will travel to the nation’s capital where they will participate in group meetings with a wide variety of leaders and engage in team-building exercises.

    “The students in the Nuala Pell Leadership Program embody the ideals Mrs. Pell wanted to celebrate when she lent this program her name.” said Jim Ludes, Pell Center executive director.  “They are selfless, focused on the public good, and committed to a style of leadership that emphasizes service to others. They inspire me and I look forward to the work they will do.”

  • Mary Jordan & Kevin Sullivan on Story in the Public Square

    Journalism around the world with Mary Jordan and Kevin Sullivan

    Air dates: May 12-14, 2018

    Journalism in the United States is under severe strain. Yet, despite shifts in the marketplace and sustained attack on specific news outlets by the current President, outstanding reporters, Mary Jordan and Kevin Sullivan, continue to shape our understanding of the world around us.

    Mary Jordan is National Political Correspondent for The Washington Post. A graduate of Georgetown University, she earned a master’s degree in journalism at Columbia University, studied Spanish for a year at Stanford University, and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard.

    Jordan spent 14 years abroad as a foreign correspondent and Washington Post co-bureau chief with her husband, Kevin Sullivan, in Tokyo, Mexico City and London. She has written from more than 40 countries. She and Kevin won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for their investigation of the Mexican justice system. They, with four Post photographers, were finalists for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for stories about difficulties facing women around the world. They also won the George Polk Award in 1998 for coverage of the Asian financial crisis.

    Jordan has been on-site covering many of the biggest stories of our time, including women’s rights in Pakistan and the 2016 presidential campaign. After the election, she spent months talking to the voters who elected Donald Trump. She also contributed to “Trump Revealed,” a Washington Post staff biography of Donald Trump published in 2016 and “Nine Irish Lives,” published in March 2018. She was the founding editor and moderator of Washington Post Live, which organizes current affairs forums and debates.

    In 2016, The Washington Post honored Jordan with the Eugene Meyer Award for distinguished service, based on the legendary former owner’s principles: “tell the truth for the public good and always be fair.”

    Kevin Sullivan is associate editor and senior correspondent covering national and international affairs for The Washington Post. After graduating from the University of New Hampshire, Sullivan subsequently spent a year at Georgetown University studying Japanese and later attended Stanford University as a John S. Knight Fellow studying Spanish.

    Sullivan was a Post foreign correspondent for 14 years, then served as chief foreign correspondent, deputy foreign editor, and Sunday and features editor. He has reported from more than 75 countries on six continents.

    With his wife, Sullivan co-authored “Hope: A Memoir of Survival in Cleveland,” a No. 1 New York Times bestseller in 2015, and “The Prison Angel: Mother Antonia’s Journey from Beverly Hills to a Life of Service in a Mexican Jail” in 2005. He also contributed to “Nine Irish Lives” and “Trump Revealed,” The Post’s 2016 biography of Donald Trump.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Dan Barry on Story in the Public Square

    The Power of Prose with Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Dan Barry

    Air Dates: May 5-7, 2018

    Every year, the Pell Center at Salve Regina University honors one individual who makes the world better with their storytelling, who shines a light into the dark places of the human experience, and who helps us all better understand the world around us and our place in it.  In 2018, we are honoring Dan Barry of the New York Times, and we talk to him this week, on Story in the Public Square.

    Dan Barry is a longtime reporter and columnist for The New York Times, having written both the “This Land” and “About New York” columns. The author of several books, he writes on myriad topics, including sports, culture, New York City, and the nation. Since joining The Times in September 1995, Barry has covered many major events, including the World Trade Center disaster, the destructive wake of Hurricane Katrina, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo., following the police shooting death of a young black man. His many honors include the 2003 American Society of Newspaper Editors Award for deadline reporting, for his coverage of the first anniversary of Sept. 11; the 2005 Mike Berger Award, from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism; and the 2015 Best American Newspaper Narrative Award.

    He has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize twice: once in 2006 for his slice-of-life reports from hurricane-battered New Orleans and from New York, and again in 2010 for his coverage of the Great Recession and its effects on the lives and relationships of America. His most recent honor is the sixth-annual Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square, conferred in April 2018.

    Barry previously worked at The Providence Journal. As a member of its investigative team, he shared a George Polk Award in 1992, for a series on the causes of a state banking crisis, and a Pulitzer Prize in 1994, for an investigation into Rhode Island’s court system that led to various reforms and the criminal indictment of the chief justice of the state’s Supreme Court.

    Barry is the author of “The Boys in the Bunkhouse: Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland,” published in 2016; “Bottom of the 33rd: Hope, Redemption, and Baseball’s Longest Game,” published in 2011; “City Lights,” a collection of his “About New York” columns, published in 2007; and “Pull Me Up: A Memoir,” published in May 2004. A collection of his “This Land” columns is to be released in September 2018. Barry is also one of the writers behind the smash-hit podcast, “Crimetown.”

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Dan Barry receives 2018 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

    Dan Barry receives 2018 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

    The buzz of excitement, and joy of reconnecting with old friends emanated through the ballroom at the Pell Center. Family, friends and former colleagues gathered to honor the creative storytelling of a lifetime.

    Dan Barry, The New York Times

    Dan Barry, The New York Times

    On April 23, Dan Barry, a New York Times senior writer, author of four books, Pulitzer winner, and two-time Pulitzer finalist, received the 2018 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square. The prize honors a storyteller whose work has significantly influenced the public dialogue.

    At the beginning of his career, Barry was a member of a Providence Journal team that won the 1994 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting. Many of those he worked with including Tom Heslin, a former executive editor of the Journal, were in the audience. Barry reflected on his time at the journal, shared some humor, and advice he had received from Heslin that made him look at things a bit differently: “Slow. It. Down,” the former editor had told the young reporter. And for Barry, it’s made a world of difference, helping him to find a story in the “seemingly mundane details.”

    “To me, telling stories is like the childhood pursuit of catching fireflies in a glass jar.” Barry said. “In the never-ending rush of time, you reach out to capture a glowing moment. You hold it up to examination with a kind of informed innocence.”

    G. Wayne Miller, current senior writer at the Providence Journal and director of Story in the Public Square reminisced of Dan’s early days at the Journal with praise. “I have come to believe that some things can only be explained by magic, and I now understand that Dan’s way with words — the stunning power of his prose; his voice, unlike any other — was magic of the highest literary order,” said Miller.

    G. Wayne Miller, Providence Journal

    G. Wayne Miller, Providence Journal

    Story in the Public Square is an initiative that celebrates and analyses the role storytelling plays in public life. In his opening remarks, Executive Director of the Pell Center at Salve Regina University, Jim Ludes touched on why Dan’s work encapsulates the purpose of what Story in the Public Square set out to do.

    “We want more and more people to understand that we are bombarded by stories every day, some of them are truthful.  Some of them are not.  But all shape our understanding of the world around us and the actions we take as citizens and, collectively, as a democratic society,” said Ludes.

    While in Rhode Island, Barry taped an episode of “Story in the Public Square” for broadcast on SiriusXM Satellite radio and Rhode Island PBS to air on the weekend of May 5, 2018. Like the exuberant evening of the Pell Center Prize award, it is an episode filled with laughter and wit.

    Jim Ludes, Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

    Jim Ludes, Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

    “Storytelling sustains us,” Barry said, “It helps us to navigate the shoals of life. To understand our everyday existence. To empathize with our brothers and sisters. To embrace the human condition in all its complicated wonder and glory.”

    Barry’s most recent book, “The Boys in the Bunkhouse: Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland,” about men with intellectual disabilities who spent decades working at an Iowa turkey-processing plant while living in an old schoolhouse, was a searing story of exploitation and abuse – and eventual justice and freedom. It was recently named the All Iowa Reads selection for 2018.

    His other books include “Pull Me Up,” “City Lights: Stories About New York,” and “Bottom of the 33rd: Hope, Redemption, and Baseball’s Longest Game,” set in Pawtucket. A collection of Barry’s national columns for The Times, “This Land: Dispatches from Real America,” is scheduled to be published in September. To read some of Dan’s work at The New York Times, visit, www.nytimes.com/by/dan-barry.

    Visit our post “Dan Barry Acceptance Remarks for 2018 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square” to see his full speech from the evening.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs weekly on SiriusXM P.O.T.U.S. (channel 124) as well as Rhode Island PBS. Founded six years ago this month, Story in the Public Square is an initiative to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter. A partnership of the Pell Center and The Providence Journal, the program sponsors public events, and names the top public narrative each year. Past episodes may be viewed at http://pellcenter.org/story-in-the-public-square/episodes/

    Visit Story in the Public Square at pellcenter.org, like on Facebook and follow on Twitter @PubStory.

    All photos courtesy of Lewis Abramson

  • Dan Barry Accepts 2018 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

    Dan Barry Acceptance Remarks for 2018 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

    Thank you, Wayne. Thank you, Jim.

    Dan Barry acceptance speech 2

    Just know that it is now officially too late for you and the Pell Center to change your mind. Mary, start the car.

    What an honor it is to be receiving this award. It means so much because The Pell Center Prize for Story in the

    Public Square is not about investigative reporting, or deadline reporting,

    or opinion writing. It centers on something less celebrated — but more elemental. Something that binds all nonfiction at its best.

    That, of course, is the telling of the story:

    The pursuit of enticing the audience to step out of their own lives and into the lives of others — all through the alchemy of facts, and words, and images, carefully arranged.

     

    I just turned 60 years old, and for most of my life, if someone bothered to ask what I did for a living, I would proudly say:

    I’m a newspaper reporter. A scribe. A hack. An ink-stained wretch.

    Or, if I wanted to impress the ladies: I’m a journalist.

    But a few years ago, I was speeding in a rental car through a place called Washington, Kansas.

    You know where that is, right?

    Between Marysville and Scandia?

    Anyway, I was speeding down Highway 36, singing along with the radio to “Nights in White Satin” by the Moody Blues:

    Nights in white satin, I don’t know the words

    When a Kansas state trooper pulled me over.

    La la la la la, I am so screwed.

    License and registration.

    Then the trooper said: Mind if I ask a question? What’s a fella from New Jersey, driving a car with Colorado plates, doing in northern Kansas.

    It’s for my job, sir.

    What do you do?

    I’m a reporter for The New York Times (This is before our name was presidentially changed to The Failing New York Times.).

    Don’t read it, the trooper said. What’s your business here?

    Well, officer, if you must know.

    I was just in Junction City, Kansas, where I watched the inauguration of President Obama with some middle school students — the children of soldiers at Fort Riley preparing for another deployment. They have a lot at stake in the new president, and I wanted to be there.

    Uh huh. And where are you headed?

    Carleton, Nebraska. It’s a town of about 140 people, and a few days ago a masked man robbed the bank, about the only business left in town. Witnesses described him as having – quote — a LARGE NOSE AND FAT FINGERS.

    You haven’t seen anyone fitting that description, have you, officer? Large nose? Fat fingers?

    The trooper looked at me for an uncomfortable length of time. Finally, he said: Have a nice day –

    Oh, and I almost forgot. Here’s a speeding ticket for $123.

    That state trooper gave me more than a speeding ticket. He forced me to think about that eternal, self-involved question: Who am I What is it I do?

    Well, like so many people gathered here tonight, I guess I’m a storyteller.

    And, to my mind, there is no greater calling.

    Dan Barry acceptance speechTo me, telling stories is like the childhood pursuit of catching fireflies in a glass jar. In the never-ending rush of time, you reach out to capture a glowing moment.

    You hold it up to examination with a kind of informed innocence.

    You meditate on its individual wonder.

    You try to see its place in the larger context of the universe.

    I’ve always been like this. I’ve always had a pen and pad with me – at considerable cost to many suit jackets and pairs of khaki pants. But I want to be always ready to capture another firefly of a moment.

    Here, for example, is my life. More than 30 years ago, I was at a county fair in Connecticut, and there was an attraction for – a large pig. The recording of the carnival barker’s pitch was so beguiling to me that I listened to over and over, until I had written it down exactly:

    Ladies and gentlemen, your attention please. If you have come to see the rare and unusual, come right in and see Big Alfie, the giant pig. Big Alfie is twice the size of the average pig. He is over 1,000 pounds. He is eight feet long and four feet tall. His jaws are so powerful that they could take a man’s leg off — in one bite. Come right in and see Big Alfie before you leave this arena. He’s one of a kind!

    What’s crazy about this is: I still have that scrawled note. And while I have never written a story about Big Alfie, here’s the thing: I still think that, someday — maybe I will.

    There are many reasons why I am this way.

    For one thing, I had what others might call a dysfunctional childhood — but I prefer to think of it as merely insane. There was a lot of drinking, and fighting, and searching the skies for UFOs – as you do.

    But at the center of it all was The Word.

    My mother, an orphaned girl from County Galway, was a kind of suburban seanachie – spinning Homeric epics out of a simple run to the supermarket for a loaf of bread.

    My father, a New Yorker hardened by the privations of the Great Depression, was forever delivering speeches in the kitchen – to a captive audience of eight, including three dogs — on how the powerful need to be held accountable.

    And me? I got beat up a lot as a kid. My parochial school uniform included green pants, green tie, green and gold belt, and a gold shirt with the insignia of the Holy Spirit embroidered on the shirt pocket.

    I looked like an usher at a St. Patrick’s Day party from hell.

    It was catnip for bullies.

    But you take these three gifts – the gift of language, the gift of skepticism, and the gift of the victim’s perspective – and my future was all but predestined.

    Another reason why I am so drawn to the telling of stories is that I somehow wound up in Rhode Island, in the newsroom of the Providence Journal. At one point I was working on a project about the state’s infamous banking crisis. This project was chock-full of colorful characters, operatic moments, and larcenous behavior.

    That’s right: I was writing about North Providence.

    Anyway, I was pushing to get the story in the paper right away, because I had been conditioned to always be on deadline – always be in the paper. But my editor, Tom Heslin, who’s here this evening, sent me a three-word note through the newspaper’s messaging system.

    The note said, simply: Slow it down.

    Slow. It. Down.

    I have thought about those three words more than Tom could have imagined. Beyond being good advice for how to live, “Slow It Down” has meant – in terms of storytelling – to savor that which is before you.

    To recognize the epiphanies to be found in the throwaway moment; in the seemingly mundane details; in the lives of the voiceless, the vulnerable, the people who are just trying to get by.

    Here’s how I slow it down.

    I read a small article about a man who saved someone from drowning off the shores of Coney Island, and I think: I’ve never saved anyone from drowning. What does that feel like? Is it slippery? Is the victim buoyant in the water? It may not be news – but it is a story about the preciousness of life.

    I go out on a torrential day in Manhattan, hear the song of rain-soaked men selling cheap umbrellas — “’Brella, ‘brella, ‘brella” – and wonder: Where do all these umbrellas come from? And there’s a story.

    I spend a lot of time in Hampton Inns and Holiday Inn Expresses, and I think about the housecleaners — the maids, who spend their days cleaning the messes of others. They are invariably immigrants, and I ask: What must it be like to be an immigrant maid, working in a hotel – owned by Donald Trump.

    And there is a story.

     

    The mind trick, for me, is to try to put myself not only in the shoes of others – but in their skin as well.

    Dan Barry, The New York Times

    At the same time, stories told by others have informed my worldview. Others who are here this evening.

    Marc Smerling, whose multimedia work includes the “Crimetown” podcast. Perhaps you’ve heard of it.

    Kevin Cullen, the great Boston columnist and the Boswell to Whitey Bulger.

    Kevin Sullivan and Mary Jordan of the Washington Post, who infuriate me because they never stop working. Kevin leaves tomorrow for Morocco. To out that in perspective, that’s even farther than Woonsocket.

    Wayne Miller, who just recently helped the world understand the enigma that is Michael Flynn.

    And, especially, other former colleagues of mine from the Providence Journal, many of whom I see here tonight. It shouldn’t be forgotten that the Providence Journal led the way in publishing narrative non-fiction of high quality in the pages of newspapers.

    I am so grateful to have worked there, with you.

    So thank you again for this humbling honor.

    Storytelling sustains us. It helps us to navigate the shoals of life. To understand our everyday existence. To empathize with our brothers and sisters. To embrace the human condition in all its complicated wonder and glory.

    Shout it from the rooftops and in the public square. Say Hallelujah. Say Amen.

    Thank you.

    All photos courtesy of Lewis Abramson

  • Kenneth Miller on "Story in the Public Square"

    Common Ground Between God & Science with Kenneth Miller

    Air dates: April 28-30, 2018

    One of the most important stories in human history is the creation story of the Hebrew bible. Its impact can still be felt today in debates over the proper role of creation and evolution in American classrooms. Kenneth Miller is a respected scientist whose published work seeks common ground between God and science.

    Kenneth R. Miller is Professor of Biology at Brown University. He did his undergraduate work at Brown, and earned a Ph. D in 1974 at the University of Colorado. He spent six years as Assistant Professor at Harvard University before returning to Brown University in 1980. His research on cell membrane structure and function has produced more than 60 scientific papers and reviews in leading journals, including CELL, Nature, and Scientific American.

    Miller is coauthor, with Joseph S. Levine, of four different high school and college biology textbooks that are used by millions of students nationwide. He has received six major teaching awards at Brown, the Presidential Citation of the American Institute for Biological Science (2005), and the Public Service Award of the American Society for Cell Biology (2006). In 2009, Miller was honored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for Advancing the Public Understanding of Science, and received the Gregor Mendel Medal from Villanova University.

    In 2011, he was presented with the Stephen Jay Gould Prize by the Society for the Study of Evolution, and in 2014, he received the Laetare Medal from Notre Dame University. He is the author of the popular books Finding Darwin’s God (A Scientist’s Search for Common Ground between God and Evolution), and Only a Theory (Evolution and the Battle for America’s Soul). His latest book, The Human Instinct (How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness, and Free Will), was published by Simon and Schuster on April 17, 2018.

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Justin Kenny and Steve Morrison on Story in the Public Square

    The New Barbarianism with Justin Kenny & Steve Morrison

    Air dates: April 21-23, 2018

    International law outlaws the targeting of medical facilities in conflicts. However, guests, Justin Kenny and Steve Morrison, point to an alarming trend in the Syrian Civil War and other conflicts where combatants are targeting healthcare facilities and healthcare workers through their film, “The New Barbarianism.”

    Justin Kenny is an award-winning television news producer and editor based in Washington, D.C. and the founder of Small Footprint Films. In 2017, he directed and wrote his first feature documentary along with Executive Producer and co-director Morrison, “The New Barbarianism.” The film was a collaboration with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and takes a close look at the under-reported phenomenon of attacks on health care in today’s wars. Kenny is a PBS NewsHour contributor and a graduate of Marymount University where he was the 2016 Marya McLaughlin Lecturer in Media Communications. He began his media career at the age of 10 as a paperboy for the Providence Journal-Bulletin.

    Stephen Morrison is senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and director of its Global Health Policy Center. Dr. Morrison writes widely, has directed several high-level commissions, and is a frequent commentator on U.S. foreign policy, global health, Africa, and foreign assistance. He served in the Clinton administration, as committee staff in the House of Representatives, and taught for 12 years at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin and is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale College.

    Film site: https://www.csis.org/features/new-barbarianism

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 8:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. Listen to the podcast in iTunes. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

     

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