• Justin Hendrix on Story in the Public Square

    The Future of Media with Justin Hendrix

    Air Dates: October 20-22, 2018

    We live in a world awash with media of all types. If we’re honest, it seems like we have not yet mastered the current onslaught of social media in public life. Justin Hendrix warns that, for good or for bad, the future is coming.

    Justin Hendrix is Executive Director of NYC Media Lab, connecting media and tech companies with NYC universities to drive digital media innovation and entrepreneurship. Previously he was Vice President, Business Development & Innovation for The Economist. He holds a BA from the College of William & Mary and an MSc in Technology Commercialization from the McCombs School of Business, University of Texas at Austin. Follow him on Twitter @justinhendrix.

    Founded in 2010, NYC Media Lab is dedicated to driving innovation and ultimately job growth in media and technology by facilitating collaboration between the City’s universities and its companies. Comprised of a consortium including New York City Economic Development Corporation, School of Visual Arts, New York University, Columbia University, The New School, CUNY, IESE, and Pratt Institute, NYC Media Lab’s goals are to include generate research and development, knowledge transfer, and talent across all of the city’s campuses.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • John Kerry on live set of Story in the Public Square

    John Kerry tapes special episode of Story in the Public Square at Salve Regina University

    Jim Ludes, Sister Jane Gerety and John Kerry small

    Dr. James Ludes, Jane Gerety and Senator John Kerry in Ochre Court prior to the taping of Story in the Public Square at Salve Regina University, Newport.

    NEWPORT, R.I. – Silence filled the great hall of Ochre Court. The cameras rolled and the audience sat in hushed anticipation of the special guest. On October 10, former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry filmed a special edition episode of Story in the Public Square at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island. Salve Regina President Sister Jane Gerety gave the opening remarks welcoming the Secretary to the University.

    Hosted by Jim Ludes, Executive Director of the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy, and G. Wayne Miller, Senior Staff Writer at The Providence Journal, Story in the Public Square is a weekly 30-minute program that tries to make sense of the stories shaping public life in the United States.

    Upon answering the first question from Story in the Public Square co-host Jim Ludes, Kerry broke his stoicism. “First of all, I’m glad the Red Sox won last night,” he said, to much laughter and amusement of the audience.

    The episode focuses on Kerry’s new book, Every Day is Extra. “This one is a lot from the heart and from the gut,” Kerry said, “It’s honest and it’s optimistic.”

    As a young man in his college years, he was steered into public service by his experience with war. He recalled his earliest memory at age four walking through the rubble left by World War II in the streets of Paris holding his mother’s hand. Hearing the glass crunching under his feet, he realized this was because of war. He remembered friends going off to fight the Soviets and representatives sent from his school to support the civil rights movement. President Kennedy’s assassination and his own service in Vietnam showed him that each day we are lucky to be here. The title of his book is no exception.

    He has a fierce idealism and a hopefulness about America and American citizenship that resonated throughout the discussion.

    “How do we protect democracy and how do we sail forward?” asked Ludes.

    “Well, boats have a captain,” said Kerry. “We need a new captain.”

    John Kerry on Story in the Public Square

    Senator John Kerry, right, addresses questions from G. Wayne Miller, left, as they tape a segment of Story in the Public Square in Ochre Court, Salve Regina University, Newport.

    America is at a low point, he went on, but history unfolds like that: it ebbs and flows. Kerry was at the forefront of many initiatives in his early political days and urged young people to turn their aspirations into voting issues. Getting out there and doing something about it — that’s how things get done. We have to put people in Congress to solve these issues, he said.

    His advice to the students in the room?

    “We get another shot, the second shot is coming in twenty-seven days,” said Kerry, “call and ask what you can do to help.” The 2018 midterm election is Nov. 6.

    There is a great anger in the U.S. that is dividing the country day-to-day and breaking down democracy, Kerry said.  In order to restore it, he said, we the people must stand up and define it.

    “The only way to do it is to vote,” is how Kerry put it,

    During the question-and-answer portion, an audience member asked what Secretary Kerry thought was the most important thing that universities should be teaching their students. He explained how during his time in Vietnam, soldiers would more likely be ambushed than attack first. Yet in World War II on the beaches of Normandy, they marched straight to their death. Many of the men standing next to them were shot.

    “You knew when your life was going to end and you had to walk forward and fight for another country’s freedom” he said. “It’s that selfless extraordinary level of sacrifice. They should learn about responsibility and the meaning of citizenship.”

    John Kerry speaking to audience

    Senator John Kerry, right, addresses questions from G. Wayne Miller, left, and Dr. Jim Ludes as they tape a segment of Story in the Public Square in Ochre Court, Salve Regina University, Newport.

    The episode of Story in the Public Square featuring John Kerry will air on October 28, on Rhode Island PBS and four times during the weekend on SiriusXM’s P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

    Photos courtesy of Andrea Hansen 

     

  • Padma Venkatraman on Story in the Public Square

    Experiencing the World Through Reading with Padma Venkatraman

    Air Dates: October 13-15, 2018

    The stories we tell ourselves shape who we are, as individuals, and as a society. Padma Venkatraman is a novelist whose stories explore enduring themes about the use of violence to resist evil, the meaning of family, and tension between tradition and modernity.

    Multiple award-winning author Padma Venkatraman was born in Chennai, India. She came to the U.S. at the age of 19, and became an American citizen after earning a Ph.D. in oceanography from The College of William and Mary.

    Padma has worked as chief scientist on oceanographic ships, spent time under the sea, directed a school, and lived in 5 countries. Her 3 novels, A Time to Dance, Island’s End and Climbing the Stairs. Each novel received multiple starred reviews at the release, and received numerous honors and won several national and international awards. Padma gives keynote addresses, speaks on TV and radio, serves on panels, conducts workshops, has been the chief guest at international author festivals, and visits schools all over the world.

    She has written several other books, including: Double Stars: The Story of Caroline Herschel (Profiles in Science); Women Mathematicians (Profiles in Mathematics); and the illustrated Growing Gold and Cleverest Thief.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • NCSAM Champions

    Pell Center to Host Conference During National Cyber Security Awareness Month

    Newport, RI – For the fourth year in a row, the Pell Center is supporting the annual National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) campaign as a NCSAM Champion Organization.  This national effort aims to raise public awareness about the importance of cybersecurity and share useful resources through social media and various events across the country. The Pell Center is partnering with Anomali, Tech Collective, and Tevora to offer a half-day conference on Wednesday, October 17th on the growing market for cybersecurity jobs and the need to build a culture of cybersecurity across organizations.

    National Cyber Security Awareness Month LogoThe event will shine a spotlight on the critical need to build a strong, cyber-secure workforce, address the cybersecurity skills gap, and encourage every workplace to create a culture of cybersecurity from the boardroom to the server room. It will highlight how a well-trained and cyber-aware workforce can become the first (and best) line of defense for organizations of all sizes and in all sectors, and help them better protect themselves, their employees, and their customers against the most common cyber threats and mitigate, respond to, and recover from cyber incidents. It will also discuss careers in cybersecurity and ways to motivate young students, veterans, and individuals who are looking for a new career or re-entering the workforce to learn more about the field and seek highly fulfilling, well-paying and rewarding cybersecurity jobs.

    Pell Center Senior Fellow, and head of the Cyber Leadership Project, Francesca Spidalieri, organized and will moderate the conference. The event is part of the Rhode Island Corporate Cybersecurity Initiative (RICCI) – an ongoing effort designed to bring together senior leaders across various industries in order to discuss the most pressing cyber threats facing corporate and public sector leaders in the digital age and promoting best practices to prevent, protect, mitigate, respond, and remediate cyber incidents.

    Susan Peediyakkal, Cyber Threat Intelligence Program Lead Consultant at Booz Allen Hamilton, will deliver a keynote address on how the shortage of well-trained cybersecurity professionals continues to be a key risk to our economy and national security. Inspiring the next generation of interested and capable cybersecurity professionals to better safeguard our ever-expanding cyber ecosystem is a starting point to building stronger defenses. Ms. Peediyakkal’s talk will also cover best practices for hiring, educating, and retaining highly sought-after cybersecurity professionals.

    The keynote will be followed by a panel discussion with renown cybersecurity experts from the engineering, legal, academic, consulting, and digital forensics fields and will focus on how to foster a culture of cybersecurity and awareness within organizations and train employees on cybersecurity best practices. Panel members will include: O’Shea Bowens, CEO and Founder of Null Hat Security; Joe Provost, Computer Scientist & Professor at Salve Regina University; Linn Freedman, Principal at Robinson & Cole; Rick Norberg, CEO at Vertikal6; and Clayton Riness, Managing Director Threat Services at Tevora.

    Please visit the Rhode Island Corporate Cybersecurity Initiative (RICCI) webpage for more information on all our upcoming events and links to register.

    For additional information, contact Francesca Spidalieri, Pell Center Senior Fellow for Cyber Leadership.

     

  • Sandeep Jauhar on "Story in the Public Square"

    Heart: A History with Dr. Sandeep Jauhar

    Air Dates: September 29 – October 1, 2018

    We rely on physicians and the American healthcare industry to keep us healthy—and when we are gravely sick, we rely on them to keep us alive. Dr. Sandeep Jauhar has been on both sides of that equation, and his books give us an insight normally reserved for insiders.

    A practicing cardiologist, Jauhar has been writing regularly about medicine for The New York Times since 1998 and is currently a contributing opinion writer for the Times. Jauhar has written two medical memoirs, both published by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

    His latest book, Heart: A History, is a scientific history, as well as a personal story. It tells the colorful and little-known story of the doctors who risked their careers and the patients who risked their lives to know and heal our most vital organ. It will be published on September 18, 2018, in seven languages and a dozen countries. Heart: A History, is an Amazon Best of the Month for September, and One of Amazon’s Most Anticipated Fall Books

    From the publisher:

    “Deftly alternating between key historical episodes and his own work, Jauhar tells the colorful and little-known story of the doctors who risked their careers and the patients who risked their lives to know and heal our most vital organ. He introduces us to Daniel Hale Williams, the African American doctor who performed the world’s first open heart surgery in Gilded Age Chicago. We meet C. Walton Lillehei, who connected a patient’s circulatory system to a healthy donor’s, paving the way for the heart-lung machine. And we encounter Wilson Greatbatch, who saved millions by inventing the pacemaker―by accident. Jauhar deftly braids these tales of discovery, hubris, and sorrow with moving accounts of his family’s history of heart ailments and the patients he’s treated over many years. He also confronts the limits of medical technology, arguing that future progress will depend more on how we choose to live than on the devices we invent. Affecting, engaging, and beautifully written, Heart: A History takes the full measure of the only organ that can move itself.”

    His first book, Intern: A Doctor’s Initiation, published in 2009, was a national bestseller and was optioned by NBC for a dramatic television series. The book is Jauhar’s story of his days and nights in residency at a busy hospital in New York City, a trial that led him to question his every assumption about medical care today.

    His second book, Doctored: The Disillusionment of an American Physician, released in August 2014, was a New York Times bestseller and was named a New York Post Best Book of 2014. It was praised as “highly engaging and disarmingly candid” by The Wall Street Journal, “beautifully written and unsparing” by The Boston Globe, and “extraordinary, brave and even shocking” by The New York Times.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Sister Helen Prejean on "Story in the Public Square"

    Dead Man Walking with Sister Helen Prejean

    Air Dates: September 22-24, 2018

    Since 1976, nearly 1500 Americans have been executed in the name of justice. Sister Helen Prejean, though, cautions about the human cost of the death penalty and the innocent victims wrongfully put to death.

    Sister Helen Prejean was born on April 21, 1939, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She joined the Sisters of St. Joseph of Medaille in 1957 (now know as the Congregation of St. Joseph) and received a B.A. in English and Education from St. Mary’s Dominican College, New Orleans in 1962. In 1973, she earned an M.A. in Religious Education from St. Paul’s University in Ottawa, Canada. She has been the Religious Education Director at St. Frances Cabrini Parish in New Orleans, the Formation Director for her religious community, and has taught junior and senior high school students.

    Sister Helen began her prison ministry in 1981 when she dedicated her life to the poor of New Orleans. While living in the St. Thomas housing project, she became pen pals with Patrick Sonnier, the convicted killer of two teenagers, sentenced to die in the electric chair of Louisiana’s Angola State Prison.

    Upon Sonnier’s request, Sister Helen repeatedly visited him as his spiritual advisor. In doing so, her eyes were opened to the Louisiana execution process. Sister Helen turned her experiences into a book that not only made the 1994 American Library Associates Notable Book List. Dead Man Walking: An Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty in the United States was number one on the New York Times Best Seller List for 31 weeks. It also was an international best seller, and has been translated into ten different languages.

    In January 1996, the book was developed into a major motion picture. The movie received four Oscar nominations including Tim Robbins for Best Director, Sean Penn for Best Actor, Susan Sarandon for Best Actress, and Bruce Springsteen’s “Dead Man Walking” for Best Song. Susan Sarandon won the award for Best Actress.

    Sr. Helen’s second book, The Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions, was published in December 2004. In it, she tells the story of two men, Dobie Gillis Williams and Joseph O’Dell, whom she accompanied to their executions. She believes both of them were innocent. In The Death of Innocents she takes the reader through all the evidence, including evidence the juries never heard either due to the incompetence of the defense lawyers or the rigid formalities of court procedure. S. Helen examines how flaws inextricably entwined in the death penalty system inevitably lead to innocent people being executed and render the system unworkable.

    Fifteen years after beginning her crusade, the Roman Catholic sister has witnessed five executions in Louisiana and today educates the public about the death penalty by lecturing, organizing and writing. As the founder of “Survive,” a victim’s advocacy group in New Orleans, she continues to counsel not only inmates on death row, but the families of murder victims, as well.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Mark Blyth on Story in the Public Square

    Why American Debt is Good with Mark Blyth

    Air Dates: September 15-17, 2018

    One of the most persistent ideas in the politics of the West, whether we’re talking about Europe or the United States, is that government debt is best attacked through reducing government spending. Mark Blyth, warns though, that “austerity,” as such plans are known, is a historically dangerous idea.

    Blyth received his PhD in political science from Columbia University in 1999 and taught at the Johns Hopkins University from 1997 until 2009. Since then, he has been Professor of International Political Economy in the Department of Political Science at Brown University and a Faculty Fellow at Brown’s Watson Institute for International Studies.

    His research interests lie in the field of international political economy. More specifically, his research trespasses several fields and aims to be as interdisciplinary as possible, drawing from political science, economics, sociology, complexity theory, and evolutionary theory. Blyth’s work falls into several related areas: the politics of ideas, how institutions change, political parties, and the politics of finance.

    The politics of ideas focuses upon how agents deal with complexity and uncertainty in the design of institutions and the expression of their interests. Institutional change focuses upon evolutionary dynamics in complex systems, especially financial systems. He is interested in how, again, agents act within such systems given the non-linear dynamics that they generate. His work on political parties has focused upon how political parties self-insure against uncertainty via cartel structures. Finally, his work on finance focuses upon the politics of regulatory change, the role of macro-prudential regulation, the distributional costs of financial crises, and the power of financial ideas in politics.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Gary Glassman on Story in the Public Square

    A New Look at Native America with Gary Glassman

    Air Dates: September 8-10, 2018

    One of America’s persistent myths is that the first European migrants to the so-called “new world,” found a largely uninhabited continent. In a new documentary, Gary Glassman brings alive the thriving cities, social networks, art, and science of Native America.

    Gary Glassman is a producer and director whose documentaries aired on NOVA/PBS, The History Channel, the BBC, National Geographic and The Discovery Channel, among other places. His Rhode island-based company, Providence Picture, has produced a wide range of films including Building Wonders of the World, Petra – Lost City of Stone, Colosseum – Roman Death Trap, Forensics on Trial, Building the Great Cathedrals, Riddles of the Sphinx, The Trial of Jesus, and The Bible’s Buried Secrets. Their films have won and been honored with nominations for television’s most prestigious awards — six Emmys, two Writers Guild Awards, the AAA Science Journalism Prize, International Archaeological Film Festival, the CINE Golden Eagle Special Jury Award, and many more.

    Glassman’s next production, NATIVE AMERICA, a four-part series, premieres Tuesday, October 23, 2018 and continues October 30 and November 13. Weaving history and science with living Indigenous traditions, the series brings to life a land of massive cities connected by social networks spanning two continents, with unique and sophisticated systems of science, art and writing. Made with the active participation of Native American communities and filmed in some of the most spectacular locations in the hemisphere, NATIVE AMERICA illuminates the splendor of a past whose story has for too long remained untold.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Julie Marron on Story in the Public Square

    Julie Marron Brings us Social Justice Documentaries with a Twist

    Air Dates: September 1-3, 2018

    “Four games in Fall” lingers in the sports’-fan’s ear like a claxon in the night.  It was the punishment Tom Brady served for his role in “deflate-gate.” Julie Marron argues, however, that Brady, despite his iconic status, was not treated fairly or justly—and the reasons why matter to all of us.

    Marron is the writer and director of Lemon Martini Productions. Prior to her filmmaking career, Marron spent several years working as a strategy and management consultant to Fortune 500 corporations. Her current film, FOUR GAMES IN FALL, has won awards in film festivals across the country and is currently in limited theatrical release. Her first feature length documentary, HAPPYGRAM, was released in 2015 and screened at film festivals across the country. The film received several awards including First Prize for the Providence Film Festival at the Rhode Island International Film Festival.

    ​Julie also volunteers with several non-profit organizations and is a contributing author to Equity and Full Participation for Individuals with Severe Disabilities: A Vision for the Future.  She received a degree in Mathematics and Philosophy from St. Johns College in Santa Fe and an MBA from the University of Chicago. She currently lives in Rhode Island with her family.

    Story in the Public Square airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 5:30 a.m. ET, and Mondays at 12:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • story public square

    “Story in the Public Square” set for weekly broadcasts across America starting September 2018

    Updated: September 20, 2018

    NEWPORT, R.I. – The Telly Award-winning series Story in the Public Square will be broadcast in major markets across America beginning September 10, 2018, the show announced on Tuesday. The show has been a fixture since January 2017 on SiriusXM Satellite Radio and in southeastern New England from its flagship TV station, Rhode Island PBS.

    New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, San Francisco, Atlanta, Boston, Phoenix, Detroit, San Diego, Milwaukee, Tampa, New Orleans, Pittsburgh, Memphis, St. Louis, Portland, Oregon, and Birmingham, Alabama, are among the markets where the show will air every week. The show will be carried in 20 of the top 25 markets, 37 of the top 50 markets and 65 of the top 100 markets.

    Hosted by Jim Ludes, Executive Director of the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy at Salve Regina University, and G. Wayne Miller, Staff Writer at The Providence Journal, Story in the Public Square is a weekly 30-minute public television program that tries to make sense of the stories shaping public life in the United States and abroad.

    A partnership of the Pell Center and The Providence Journal, the program provides insights and perspectives into culture, politics and current national and international events from diverse storytellers of every variety and in any media—from acclaimed journalists, filmmakers, authors, photographers, scholars, activists, historians, musicians and more.

    “We’re excited to bring the show to a national television audience,” said Ludes.  “Storytelling has always been central to public life but it has never been more important than now, when on a daily basis we are bombarded with stories from endless sources. Our guests help us sort them out and bring us to new understandings.”

    “While we explore topics of significance to us as individuals and fellow citizens of a complex world,” Miller said, “we are also mindful that the best discussions are not only spirited but often fun. Our audiences tell us they like the lively tone we set. They also appreciate the still and moving images we incorporate into the show.”

    Thirteen guests will appear on the first national season of Story in the Public Square. They are: best-selling author and Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times staff writer Dan Barry; poet, artist and educator Eve Ewing, author of Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side; and Omer Bartov, Brown University historian and author of Anatomy of a Genocide.

    Also, longtime New York Times obituary writer Margalit Fox; civil rights legend and Martin Luther King Jr. confidante Dr. Bernard LaFayette Jr.; still photographer and Instagram pioneer Maddie McGarvey; Harvard literature scholar Martin Puchner, author of The Written World: The Power of Stories to Shape People, History, Civilization; and Tara Copp, Pentagon Bureau Chief for Military Times and author of The Warbird: Three Heroes. Two Wars. One Story.

    Also, Caroline Orr, behavioral scientist who with her handle @RVAwonk has taken Twitter by storm; Oscar-nominated Greek filmmaker Daphne Matziaraki; Julian Chambliss, a historian of urban and popular culture at Michigan State University; Edward Luce, the Washington correspondent for the Financial Times and author of The Retreat of Western Liberalism; and C.J. Chivers, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times staff writer and author of The Fighters.

    Story in the Public Square provides audiences the opportunity to hear compelling stories, and learn the story behind the stories in an accessible format where the hosts listen rather than lecture. The program offers a refreshing alternative to the standard news and public-affairs fare. The show is produced by the Pell Center and presented by Rhode Island PBS via NETA, the National Educational Telecommunications Association.

    The audio version of the series is broadcast multiple times each weekend on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States) channel. Story in the Public Square won a 2018 Telly Award for excellence in general politics/commentary for the final episode of its first year on the air on Rhode Island PBS, and the program is supported by weekly podcast versions and Miller’s regular Inside Story columns for The Providence Journal.

    Find “Story in the Public Square” on your local public television channel! 

     

    Story in the Public Square:

    On the Web: www.StoryInThePublicSquare.com

    On Twitter: @pubstory

    On Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoryInThePublicSquare/

    On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9AgsEnJGAgXqTMp2CxA-4w

     

     

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