• Omer Bartov on Story in the Public Square

    Omer Bartov on Story in the Public Square

    Rebroadcast dates: April 7-9, 2018
    Original Air Dates: January 26-27, 2018

    “What would I have done?”  It’s a central question in the student of history’s imagination when confronted by the horrors of the holocaust. Our guest this week, Omer Bartov, delves deep into the experience of one town in Ukraine changed forever by genocide.

    Omer Bartov is the John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History and Professor of German Studies at Brown University. Born in Israel and educated at Tel Aviv University and St. Antony’s College, Oxford, Bartov’s early research concerned the Nazi indoctrination of the Wehrmacht and the crimes it committed in World War II, analyzed in his books, The Eastern Front, 1941-1945, and Hitler’s Army. He then turned to the links between total war and genocide, discussed in his books Murder in Our Midst, Mirrors of Destruction, and Germany’s War and the Holocaust.

    Bartov’s interest in representation also led to his study, The “Jew” in Cinema, which examines the recycling of anti-Semitic stereotypes in film. His last monograph, Erased, investigates interethnic relations in the borderlands of Eastern Europe. As a framework for this research, he led a multi-year collaborative project at the Watson Institute, culminating in the co-edited volume, Shatterzone of Empires. Bartov’s new book, Anatomy of a Genocide: The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz, published by Simon and Schuster on January 23, 2018.

    “We tend to think of the holocaust as different from anything we have ever experienced. But really it was this neighborhood type of violence, communal violence, within the towns themselves” – Omer Bartov

    In, Anatomy of a Genocide, Omer Bartov explains that ethnic cleansing doesn’t occur as is so often portrayed in popular history, with the quick ascent of a vitriolic political leader and the unleashing of military might. It begins in seeming peace, slowly and often unnoticed, the culmination of pent-up slights and grudges and indignities. The perpetrators aren’t just sociopathic soldiers. They are neighbors and friends and family. They are human beings, proud and angry and scared. They are also middle-aged men who come from elsewhere, often with their wives and children and parents, and settle into a life of bourgeois comfort peppered with bouts of mass murder: an island of normality floating on an ocean of blood.

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 8:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • South Asia Iskander Rehman

    New Horizons, New Risks

    In his contribution to a new edited volume produced by The Stimson Center, Senior Fellow Iskander Rehman explores various potential crisis scenarios in South Asia. His chapter titled, New Horizons, New Risks: A Scenario-based Approach to Thinking about the Future of Crisis Stability in South Asiacan be downloaded here.

    A “tinderbox,” “flashpoint,” or “nuclear nightmare,” no region — barring, perhaps, the Korean Peninsula — has garnered quite as many grim headlines as South Asia.1 In 2000, President Bill Clinton famously described the Indian subcontinent as “the most dangerous place in the world today.”2 Over a decade later, New York Times reporter David Sanger recounted the Obama administration’s frequent anxiety over the security of Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal.3 More recently, President Donald Trump described Pakistan as being a “very, very vital problem…because they have nuclear weapons and they have to get a hold of the situation.”4 Many of these concerns are tied to the “stability-instability paradox,” or “ugly stability” that has characterized Indo-Pakistani strategic interactions in the 21st century.5 To borrow a metaphor from the British strategist Sir James Cable, the nuclearization of the subcontinent may have forestalled the risks of large-scale conventional war, but it has also “provided a kind of greenhouse in which lesser conflicts…can flourish,” and in which spurts of subconventional violence continue to present severe escalatory risks.6 This judgement has been borne out over the past two decades as a number of nonstate cross-border incidents precipitated nuclear-tinged crises on the subcontinent.

    Rather than a more common method of examining past crises on the subcontinent, this essay models and probes two potential future types of South Asian crises. The opening section of each scenario offers some of the motives and methods for crisis modeling by teasing out a plausible trigger event, establishing background conditions and trends, reviewing moves and countermoves within the scenario, and considering the crisis aftermath. The essay concludes by distilling some implications and lessons drawn from the crisis modeling.

    Download the PDF.

    See the full volume from The Stimson Center: Investigating Crises: South Asia’s Lessons, Evolving Dynamics, and Trajectories

  • Sulome Anderson on Story in the Public Square

    Sulome Anderson on “Story in the Public Square”

    Air dates: January 20-21, 2018

    Even in the age of social media, we rely on journalists to find and tell the stories of people stuck in extreme circumstances. Joining us this week is one of the best of a new generation of journalists, Sulome Anderson.

    Anderson is a journalist and author based between Beirut, Lebanon, and New York City. An alumna of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, Anderson regularly reports feature stories for publications including Newsweek, The Atlantic, Esquire, New York, Harpers, Foreign Policy, VICE, Village Voice and Vox.com.

    Her book The Hostage’s Daughter, a memoir and investigation of her father Terry Anderson’s seven-year captivity by terrorists in Lebanon, was published with HarperCollins’ Dey Street on October 4, 2016. The Hostage’s Daughter won a Nonfiction Book Award as well as two International Book Awards and has been optioned for film.

    Anderson is currently at work on her next book, about radicalism in America, including extremism found in certain cults, gangs, religious sects and other groups.

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 8:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Margalit Fox

    Margalit Fox on “Story in the Public Square”

    Rebroadcast dates: February 24-25, 2018
    Original air dates: January 13-14, 2018

    Death, the old saying goes, is part of life. That wisdom seems especially appropriate if, like this week’s guest, Margalit Fox, you are a staff writer on the Obituaries desk at The New York Times.

    Ms. Fox has been a staff writer on the Obituaries desk of The New York Times since 2004. She was previously a staff editor at the Book Review. Ms. Fox has written the Page One send-offs of some of the best-known cultural figures of our era, including Charles Manson; the pioneering feminist Betty Friedan; the writer Maya Angelou; the poets Seamus Heaney and Adrienne Rich; the children’s author Maurice Sendak; and the advice columnists Dear Abby and Ann Landers. She has also written the obituaries of many of the unsung heroes who have managed, quietly, to touch history, among them the inventors of the Frisbee, the crash-test dummy, the plastic lawn flamingo and the bar code.

    She is the author of, Talking Hands: What Sign Language Reveals About the Mind, and, The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code.  She discusses these, and her forthcoming true-crime book, Conan Doyle for the Defense, in the episode. You can read some of Ms. Fox’s obituaries at The New York Times website.

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Martha McCann Rose

    Dr. Martha McCann Rose to lead Nuala Pell Program

    Dr. Martha McCann Rose has been named director of the Nuala Pell Leadership Program at Salve Regina University. Dr. Rose is a professor in the Education Department and a faculty fellow at the University’s Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy.

    “Martha Rose is a world-class educator and colleague,” said Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes.  He continued, “Her commitment to students, her desire to see them grow as leaders, and her advocacy for all students to have opportunities for growth like the Nuala Pell Leadership Program makes her the ideal fit.  We’re lucky to work with her.”

    The program’s previous director, Chelsea Buffington, left the University recently to take on new responsibilities at Cal State University at Monterrey.

    Rose earned her Ph. D. in special education from the University of Connecticut. During her twelve years at Salve she has served as chair and co-chair for the Education Department and been very involved within the university at large. She was the Dean for the Class of 2017 and served on many committees.

    “I’m honored to be part of a program named for Mrs. Pell. Her life and work in the service of family and country will continue to inspire us all,” said Dr. Rose.

    The Nuala Pell Leadership Program provides opportunities to a select number of diverse, high-achieving sophomores at Salve Regina, exposing them to both the theory and practice of leadership. Named in honor of the late Nuala Pell, wife of Sen. Claiborne Pell and an avid supporter of public service, the program aims to build leadership skills that can be used in the classroom and beyond.

    Students in the program have the opportunity to learn from accomplished leaders from many industries. They will also work in teams to design and implement a service project, shadow a community leader and receive mentoring from upperclassmen from preceding cohorts of the program.

    Students interested in the Nuala Pell Leadership Program may apply during the spring semester of their freshman year at Salve Regina.

  • Oona Hathaway & Scott Shapiro

    Oona Hathaway & Scott Shapiro on “Story in the Public Square”

    Air dates: January 6-7, 2017

    The history of the period between the first and second World Wars reads like a tragedy, progressing from the horror of war, to an idealistic hope for lasting peace, before descending into cataclysm. This week’s guests seize on one of the most idealistic moments in that history; the diplomacy to outlaw war. Oona Hathaway and Scott Shapiro argue that its importance far exceeds the respect given to it by most historians.

    Oona A. Hathaway is the Gerard C. and Bernice Latrobe Smith Professor of International Law and Counselor to the Dean at the Yale Law School. She is also Professor of International Law and Area Studies at the Yale University MacMillan Center, on the faculty at the Jackson Institute for International Affairs, and Professor of the Yale University Department of Political Science. She has published more than twenty-five law review articles.

    Scott Shapiro is the Charles F. Southmayd Professor of Law and Professor of Philosophy at Yale Law School. He joined the Yale Law faculty in July 2008 as a professor of law and philosophy. He previously taught law and philosophy at the University of Michigan and before that, was a professor of law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.

    He and Hathaway are coauthors of The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World, a history of international law as it has evolved from the 17th century through the present.

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 8:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • story public square

    Year in Review on “Story in the Public Square”

    Air dates: December 30-31, 2017

    In the last year, Story in the Public Square brought you scholars, journalists, novelists, movie makers and more. Some of the stories they shared made us laugh. Others caused us worry and even anger. All of them helped us understand public life in the United States today.

    Over 48 episodes in the previous 12 months, we’ve had the opportunity to talk about big issues facing the United States with remarkable storytellers and scholars. Every one of them has helped shine a light on important issues. This week, we’re going to take a look back at some of the best moments of 2017.

    One of the featured stories will be the 2017 Pell Center Prize winner, Daphne Matziaraki and her incredible documentary “22 Minutes,” about the refugee crisis on the waters between Turkey and Greece. Tune in for all of Jim & Wayne’s top picks of 2017.

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 8:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Donald Trump speaking

    The End of Moderate Conservatism: Foreign and Domestic Ramifications

    As a tumultuous year comes to a close, Senior Fellow Iskander Rehman takes a deep look at some of the more profound transformations underway under the Trump administration—whether  in the realm of politics or foreign affairs.

     

    Rise of the Reactionaries: The American Far Right and U.S. Foreign Policy

    Many of Trump’s core foreign policy beliefs are less unique than they seem at first, stemming from a longstanding reactionary tradition in American politics. The future of this foreign policy is closely tied to an intense ideological battle currently being waged within the Republican Party.

    Download is available at The Washington Quarterly 

     

    The Corruption of American ConservatismCorruption of American Conservatism

    In this Pell Center publication, Dr. Rehman chronicles the corruption of American conservatism in the Trump era. Many of America’s leading postwar conservative intellectuals, he argues, would have trouble recognizing the current ideological trajectory of the GOP.

    Download the full report: Corruption of American Conservatism.

     

     

  • Evelyn Farkas

    Evelyn Farkas on “Story in the Public Square”

    Air dates: December 16-17, 2017

    Since 2013, the Pell Center at Salve Regina University has announced a “Story of the Year,” the narrative that had the biggest impact on American public life in the preceding 12 months. This week we’re joined by, Evelyn Farkas, whose work in and out of government gives her special insight into this year’s top story.

    Dr. Evelyn N. Farkas is a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, and a national security analyst for NBC/MSNBC. She served from 2012 to 2015 as deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia/Ukraine/Eurasia, responsible for policy toward Russia, the Black Sea, Balkans, and Caucasus regions and conventional arms control. From 2010 to 2012 she served as senior adviser to the supreme allied commander Europe and special adviser to the secretary of defense for the NATO Summit. Prior to that, she was a senior fellow at the American Security Project, and executive director of the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism.

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 8:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Dr. Raymond Raymond

    Dr. Raymond J. Raymond joins Pell Center as Adjunct Fellow

    The Pell Center at Salve Regina University announced the addition of Raymond J. Raymond as an adjunct fellow. A frequent lecturer at Salve Regina University in recent years, Dr. Raymond is an expert on UK, US and European national security and foreign relations issues whose insights are much sought-after at conferences in the United States and around the globe.

    “We are delighted to have Dr. Raymond affiliated with the Pell Center,” said Executive Director Jim Ludes.  “His lectures at the University have been well received and compelling.  We look forward to helping to share the fruits of his research with a larger community.”

    Dr. Raymond earned his doctorate at University of Kansas in Modern History. He completed his post-doctoral fellowship in history at Yale University. As a former British Diplomat, Dr. Raymond served Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II until 2005, after which he worked for the Chief of Staff of the US Army to develop the academic program at the US Military Academy. The themes of his work have centered on courage; the importance of alliances; and the central role of diplomacy in preventing, managing, and resolving conflicts past and present. Dr. Raymond is a professor of government & history at the State University of New York Ulster and an adjunct professor at the US Military Academy, West Point.

    Dr. Raymond is currently working on a collective biography of five recent recipients of the Ninninger Medal for exceptional selfless courage, which is West Point’s equivalent of the Medal of Honor

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