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    March 25, 2017: “Story in the Public Square”

    From Richard Nixon to Donald Trump, leaders on both sides of the political aisle have described the state of American healthcare in terms intended to scare and mobilize voters. Guest Bob Hackey argues that those cries of crisis have warped the healthcare debate.

    IMG_5792Hackey is a political science professor at Providence College, as well as the director of the Health Policy & Management Department. He is the author of Cries of Crisis: Rethinking the Health Care Debate (Nevada, 2012) and The New Politics of State Health Policy (Georgetown, 1997), and the co-editor of Rethinking Health Care Policy: The New Politics of State Regulation (Kansas, 2001).

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

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    Statement by Executive Director Jim Ludes on President Trump’s proposal to eliminate funding for the NEA and the NEH

    March 16, 2017

    Pell Center Executive Director Dr. Jim Ludes released the following statement:

    More than 50 years ago, Senator Claiborne Pell was instrumental in passing bipartisan legislation to create the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities.  The legislation succeeded because Republicans and Democrats believed that it was essential for all Americans to study and celebrate our history, our values, and our accomplishments as a society.  Federal support for the arts and humanities allows every American to benefit, not just the wealthy and the elite, and it makes our society stronger.  The budget proposed by President Trump today casts aside not just the legacy of a great Senator, but the work of artists and scholars who help us understand what it means to be American and what it means to be human.

    Dr. Jim Ludes, Executive Director

     

     

     

  • March 18, 2017: “Story in the Public Square”

    University professors and intellectuals are often dismissed as elites, divorced from real life and disconnected from the problems of real people. Guest Michael Kennedy sees their role differently and argues, in fact, that intellectuals and universities are agents of global change.

    Michael D. Kennedy is the professor of sociology and international studies at Brown University. Throughout his career, Kennedy has addressed East European social movements, national identifications, and systemic change. For the last 15 years, he also has worked in the sociology of public knowledge, global transformations, universities and social movements.  His latest book, Globalizing Knowledge: Intellectuals, Universities, and Publics in Transformationwas recently published by Stanford University Press.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • G. Wayne Miller, Jim Ludes and Michael Corkery sitting on set at Story in the Public Square.

    March 11, 2017: “Story in the Public Square”

    For every new regulation his administration issues, President Trump has said two regulations have to be eliminated – but what about the ordinary Americans many of these regulations were designed to protect? Are we heading back to the days of predatory lenders?  Hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller sit down with Michael Corkery, a New York Times financial journalist, to try to make sense of the financial stories affecting Americans everywhere.

    Corkery writes about finance and its impact on consumers, businesses, and the environment. In 2015, he was part of a team of reporters that revealed how big banks and corporations have forced Americans to give up their day in court and instead submit their disputes to private arbitration. He has also investigated how auto lenders profit from poor people needing cars and how coal companies and their Wall Street backers use bankruptcy to shed environmental obligations.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

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    March 4, 2017: “Story in the Public Square”

    Everyone who has ever gone to school has something to say about teachers, about schools, and about education in general. But is popular opinion—fueled, often, by myth and anecdote—as valid as the considered judgments of educators and researchers?  Educational leader Dr. Irvin Scott joins hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller to help make sense of the education debate.

    Dr. Irvin Scott is an educator who began his career with 15 years in the classroom as an English teacher and choral director. Dr. Scott progressed his career as a public school administrator, including several years as the Chief Academic Officer of the public schools in Boston, MA.  In 2011, Dr. Scott became the IMG_5631deputy director for K-12 education at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, where he led the investment of $300 million in initiatives focused on transforming how teachers are recruited, developed, and rewarded.  Dr. Scott is now a Senior Lecturer at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Eric-Bennett

    February 25, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    This week, hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller are joined by a remarkably talented scholar and novelist whose work, whether for academic or popular audiences, traces the role of both narrative and truth in public life.

    Eric Bennett is the author of Workshops of Empire: Stegner, Engle, and American Creative Writing during the Cold War, and the novel A Big Enough Lie.  His fiction has appeared in A Public Space and Lumina, and his nonfiction in the New York Times, The New Yorker, The Chronicle of Higher Education, VQR, and Modern Fiction Studies.  He received an MFA in fiction writing from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a Ph.D. in English from Harvard University.  He is an associate professor at Providence College in Rhode Island.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

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    Salve Regina University’s Class of 2020 Invited to Apply for Leadership Program

    Students from Salve Regina’s Class of 2020 are invited to apply for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Named in honor of the late Nuala Pell, the wife of Senator Claiborne Pell and an avid supporter of service, the Nuala Pell Leadership Development Program aims to build students’ leadership skills for the classroom, on campus, and beyond.

    Twelve students from the Class of 2020 who demonstrate a commitment to developing their leadership skills will be selected to participate in the program.

    Students in the program will attend monthly seminars, participate in an off-campus leadership trip, and engage with accomplished leaders throughout their sophomore year at Salve. Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows have met with a variety of leaders including Rhode Island’s delegation to the US Congress, the Rhode Island Secretary of State, a Navy admiral, a vice president of National Grid, a state superior court judge, Salve’s President, and the Ambassador to the US from Liechtenstein.

    As part of the program, students work in groups to propose, design, and execute their own service projects. They also shadow an individual leader and present on that leadership experience.

    Applicants must have at least a 3.5 GPA as of September 2017 and must be able to attend all meetings of the group. All majors are encouraged to apply.

    To apply, students must complete the following requirements:

    • A Statement of Interest (400-500 words) must be submitted (via email to Chelsea.Buffington@salve.edu) by March 9th, and should indicate why you are interested in the program, interest or experience with leadership, and how you anticipate using leadership skills in the future.
    • Each applicant must identify and ask a Salve Regina faculty or staff member to submit a nomination by March 9th. Nominations may be sent to Chelsea.Buffington@salve.edu.

    Selected applicants will be asked to participate in an interview.

    Students will be notified of their provisional acceptance the week of April 14th. Selected students will be expected to attend a reception for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program on the evening of Tuesday, April 25, 2017.

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    February 18, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    With the transfer of power in Washington, the stories the United States tells the world are changing, too.  Hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller are joined this week by Katherine Brown, a public diplomacy professional who has served the United States from the corridors of Foggy Bottom to Kabul, Afghanistan.

    Dr. Brown is a 2016-2017 International Affairs Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). From 2013-2016, she served as the Executive Director of the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy at the U.S. Department of State, an office authorized by Congress to appraise and strengthen U.S. engagement activities with foreign citizens. During that time, she revitalized the Commission into an effective watchdog and advocacy platform for federal public diplomacy policy.

    Jim-Ludes,-Katherine-Brown,-G.-Wayne-MillerDr. Brown received her Ph.D. in Communications from Columbia University in 2013 and is currently an adjunct faculty member at Georgetown University’s Security Studies Program.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

     

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • G. Wayne Miller, Marc Smerling, Jim Ludes 7

    February 11, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    Politicians and voters may hate crime, but American audiences can’t get enough of shows like CSI or Law and Order.  This week on “Story in the Public Square,” hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller are joined by Marc Smerling, an Emmy-winning filmmaker who has intimately chronicled some of America’s most notorious criminals.

    Smerling is an award-winning writer, screen producer and cinematographer – and most recently, writer, producer and co-host with filmmaker Zac Stuart-Pontier of the new podcast series, “Crimetown.”

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes moderates the lecture about Pope Francis' encyclical letter as panelists Craig Condella, Deb Curtis, Jayme Hennessy, Susan Meschwitz and Chad Raymond look out upon a crowd of Salve students and Newport community members

    Spring 2017 Lecture Series Announced

    Today the Pell Center announced our Spring 2017 event series. Tickets to Pell Center events are free. Please RSVP in advance for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page, and call 401-341-2927 or email pellcenter@salve.edu with any questions or concerns.

    Please note, most events this spring will take place at the Bazarsky Lecture Hall in the O’Hare Academic Center. The exception is our March 28, 2017 event, “Rockin’ the Free World,” which will take place at the DiStefano Lecture Hall in the Antone Academic Center.

     

    The 1916 Easter Rising and the Origins of Modern Irregular Warfare

    February 15, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Dr. Timothy D. Hoyt, John Nicholas Brown Chair of Counterterrorism, U.S. Naval War College

    On April 24, 1916 (Easter Monday), Irish rebels seized key locations in downtown Dublin and declared an independent Irish Republic.  The “Easter Rising” ended in ignominious defeat, but also marked a new stage in Ireland’s struggle for national independence.  Lessons learned from the Rising contributed directly to the success of Irish rebels in the Anglo-Irish War of 1919-1921.  They also served as a model for future anti-colonial and independence struggles around the globe later in the 20th century.

    RSVP here.

     

    Racial Equity: What is the Call to Action for Higher Education?

    Thursday, March 2, 2017, 7:30 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Bethany Johnson-Javois, CEO of the St. Louis Integrated Health Network

    Bethany Johnson-Javois, Former Ferguson Commission Managing Director and CEO of the St. Louis Integrated Health Network will engage with attendees to re-connect with their leadership purpose and reflect on lessons learned from her work to address community-level trauma and toxic stress spurred by the events in Ferguson, MO on August 9, 2014. Ms. Johnson-Javois will outline a series of calls to action for higher education that offer a path to what generational change will require, using the lens of racial equity.

    This event is in partnership with Salve Regina University’s Office of Multicultural Programs and Retention. Bethany Johnson-Javois’ visit is supported by a grant from the Davis Educational Foundation, established by Stanton and Elizabeth Davis after Mr. Davis’s retirement as chairman of Shaw’s Supermarkets, Inc.

    RSVP here.  

     

    The Future of U.S. Asia Policy Under a Trump Administration

    Thursday, March 21, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Panelists:

    • Isaac Stone Fish, Senior Fellow, Asia Society
    • Dr. Tanvi Madan, Director of the India Project, Brookings Institution
    • Jeff Smith, Director of Asian Security Programs, American Foreign Policy Council

    Moderator: Dr. Iskander Rehman, Senior Fellow, Pell Center

    A panel of distinguished experts will discuss the future of the U.S. Asia Policy under a Trump Administration. In the course of the moderated discussion, the panelists will discuss issues such as the threats posed to freedom of navigation in the Asian maritime commons, the future of the US-India relationship, and perceptions of the new U.S. administration and of its Asia policy from different Asian capitals, including Beijing. The presentations will be followed by a short Q and A with the audience.

    RSVP here.

     

    Rockin’ the Free World

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    DiStefano Lecture Hall

    Dr. Sean Kay, Professor in the Department of Politics and Government, Ohio Wesleyan

    In Rockin’ the Free World, international relations expert Sean Kay takes readers inside “Bob Dylan’s America” and shows how this vision linked the rock and roll revolution to American values of freedom, equality, human rights, and peace while tracing how those values have spread globally. Rockin’ the Free World then shows how artists have engaged in advancing change via opportunity and education; domestic and international issue advocacy; and within the recording and broader communications industry. The book is built around primary interviews with prominent American and international performing artists ranging from Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees and Grammy winners to regional and local musicians. The interviews include leading industry people, management, journalists, heads of non-profits, and activists. The book concludes with a look at how musical artists have defined the American experience and what that has meant for the world.

    RSVP here.

     

    Unconditional Surrender: The Failure of Peace Negotiations in the American Civil War

    John E. McGinty Lecture in History

    April 20, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    James M. McPherson, George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton University and Pulitzer Prize-winning author

    Most wars in American history have been ended by peace negotiations that led to a treaty between the contending parties: the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, the Spanish-American War, World War I, even in some respects the Vietnam War.  The two major exceptions are the Civil War and World War II, which ended in unconditional surrender and the utter destruction of the losing side’s government and political structure.  The lecture will discuss the various efforts for a negotiated peace during the Civil War and will analyze why they failed–indeed, why they really had no chance to succeed.

    RSVP here.

     

    Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War – Film Screening & Discussion

    Monday, April 24, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    “Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War,” a film directed by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky, tells the story of Waitstill and Martha Sharp, a Unitarian Minister and his wife from Wellesley, Massachusetts who spent nearly two years on life-threatening missions in Europe. The couple left their children behind in the care of their parish to help save political dissidents and Jewish refugees fleeing the Nazi occupation across Europe.

    This lecture is in partnership with Touro Synagogue.

    RSVP here.

     

     

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