• Tim Gray on the set of "Story in the Public Square"

    Tim Gray on “Story in the Public Square” August 26, 2017

    One of the biggest Hollywood block-busters this summer is about the earliest days of World War II. Guest Tim Gray is an acclaimed chronicler of the Americans who defeated the Axis Powers and saved civilization.

    Gray is a national award-winning documentary film director, producer and writer based in Rhode Island. Tim has produced and directed 17 documentary films to date on the personal stories of the World War II generation. All of Grays’s films air nationally on American Public Television and also globally in such countries as China, Australia, France and England.

    In 2012, Gray’s World War II Foundation also dedicated the Richard D. Winters Leadership Monument in Normandy, France, a project honoring American leadership on D-Day and approved by the late Major Richard D. Winters of WWII’s Band of Brothers.

    To see all of Gray’s WWII documentary films, click here.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • John Marttila on the set of "Story in the Public Square" with Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller.

    John Marttila on “Story in the Public Square” August 19, 2017

    Storytelling is at the heart of political campaigns. Guest John Marttila has studied those stories as part of a four-decade career in American politics.

    For more than forty years, Marttila has been a leading political strategist and advisor for political candidates, elected officials and ballot campaigns. In 1972, he co-founded his first company, which oversaw the strategy and produced advertising for Vice President Joe Biden’s upset senatorial victory.

    Marttila was a senior advisor to John Kerry’s 2004 presidential campaign and Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick’s 2006 campaign. In 1996, Marttila’s company became more active internationally, conducting research and advising political campaigns in Russia, Israel, Hungary and Greece.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Pell Center Receives Grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York to Host Franco-U.S. Defense Dialogue

    Newport, RI – The Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy at Salve Regina University has received a $200,000 grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York to support the Rochambeau Dialogue over a period of two years.

    Named after one of the most celebrated French commanders of the Revolutionary War, the Rochambeau Dialogue will be an important programmatic effort designed to strengthen defense cooperation between the United States and its oldest ally—France. This will take the form of an annual Franco-U.S. defense dialogue, held in Newport, Rhode Island on the campus of Salve Regina University over the course of two days. Led by Pell Center Senior Fellow Iskander Rehman, and in partnership with a leading French think-tank, the Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique (FRS), the dialogue will serve as a forum for discussion with the participation of current and former French and American government officials.

    Rehman said that “at a time of transatlantic turmoil, initiatives such as these take on a whole new importance. It is our hope that the Rochambeau Dialogue will strengthen the fraternal bond between both republics, and raise awareness among French and American audiences of the enduring value of the alliance.”

    Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes praised the initiative and thanked Carnegie Corporation of New York for their support. “With the threats to liberal democracies on the rise,” Ludes said, “we’re eager to get to work to foster this important dialogue, and we are very grateful to the Corporation for the grant to make this effort possible.”

    Bruno Tertrais, the Deputy Director of the Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique (FRS) added that, “FRS is thrilled to be a partner in this much-needed venture. At a time when the U.S. and France are more than ever key Western defense and security partners, this new strategic dialogue will help promote mutual knowledge and understanding as well as facilitate cooperation.”

    “We hope the Rochambeau Dialogue will have a positive impact for years to come,” said Vartan Gregorian, President of Carnegie Corporation of New York. “It is our privilege to provide a grant for this thoughtful, timely, and worthwhile endeavor.”

  • Casey Michel on set at "Story in the Public Square"

    Casey Michel on “Story in the Public Square” August 5, 2017

    The national security community has warned us that Russia’s meddling in the 2016 presidential election is only a preview of what Russia might do in the 2018 and 2020 elections. Casey Michel argues that Russian intervention in American public life is even more serious, now, than even that dire prediction.

    Michel has worked as a journalist in both the U.S. and the former Soviet Union. He graduated with a Master’s degree from the Harriman Institute at Columbia University and a bachelor’s from Rice University.

    Michel is the author of “How the American Right Learned to Love Moscow in the Era of Trump,” a study published for “People for the American Way” that examines the relations between Russia and the American far-right. He is currently authoring the Crossroads Asia vertical and writing magazine pieces for The Diplomat. Michel’s pieces have appeared in numerous publications, including Foreign Policy, The Atlantic, POLITICO Magazine, and more.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Eve L. Ewing sits on set at "Story in the Public Square,"

    Eve L. Ewing on “Story in the Public Square” July 29, 2017

    Race in American life is still a very powerful force. Eve L. Ewing explores its potency in her scholarship and bears often personal witness to it in her art and in her poetry.

    Dr. Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. She is a Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Chicago; in 2018, she will begin as Assistant Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago.

    Ewing has two books forthcoming, including Electric Arches – an imaginative exploration of black girlhood and womanhood through poetry, visual art, and narrative prose set to publish on September 5, 2017. The second, When the Bell Stops Ringing: Race, History and Discourse amid Chicago’s School Closures, is expected from University of Chicago Press in fall 2018 and explores the relationship between the closing of public schools and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago’s Bronzeville community. She is also a fellow at the Center for Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago and a Civic Media Fellow at the Annenberg Innovation Lab at the University of Southern California.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Michael Klare, Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller talk on "Story in the Public Square"

    Michael Klare on “Story in the Public Square” July 22, 2017

    In grade school, we learned about the 19th century competition between European great powers for control of Africa’s natural resources. Guest Michael Klare warns about a 21st century scramble for what’s left.

    Klare is the Five College Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (a joint appointment at Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst), and director of the Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts.

    Klare is the author of fourteen books, including: Resource Wars (2001); Blood and Oil (2004); Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet (2008); and The Race for What’s Left (2012). He is also the defense correspondent for The Nation and has written for Current History, Foreign Affairs, Le Monde Diplomatique, the Los Angeles Times, Newsweek, the New York Times, Scientific American, and Technology Review.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Daniel Drezner joins Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller on set of "Story in the Public Square"

    Daniel Drezner on “Story in the Public Square” July 15, 2017

    Policy debates in Washington have long been dominated by think-tanks and academics who populate the marketplace of ideas. Daniel Drezner argues that new players are entering the field, such as global consultancies and billionaire-funded pet projects.

    Drezner is professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, and a contributor at The Washington Post.

    Drezner recently published his latest book, The Ideas Industry: How Pessimists, Partisans, and Plutocrats are Transforming the Marketplace of Ideas. His previous books include All Politics is Global: Explaining International Regulatory Regimes (Princeton University Press, 2007), which explores how and when regulatory standards are coordinated across borders in an era of globalization, U.S. Trade Strategy (Council on Foreign Relations, 2006), and The Sanctions Paradox (Cambridge University Press, 1999).

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Jim Ludes, G. Wayne Miller speak with Christopher Vials on SIPS

    Christopher Vials on “Story in the Public Square” July 8, 2017

    In the 1930s and early 1940s, prominent Americans publically endorsed a policy of “America First,” even if that meant turning a blind eye to the violence done in Europe by fascist political parties in Italy and, especially Germany.  Christopher Vials argues that American fascism has roots that go back to the end of World War I—and is enjoying new dynamism today.

    Vials is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut-Storrs, where he is also the Director of American Studies. His broader research interests include class and racial formation, popular culture, ethnic studies, and working class cultural studies.

    Vial’s monograph, Haunted by Hitler: Liberals, the Left, and the Fight against Fascism in the United States, looks at the ways in which antifascism, a political discourse with origins in the international left of the 1930s, remained in US popular culture after the Second World War.

    His first book, entitled Realism for the Masses: Aesthetics, Popular Front Pluralism, and US Culture: 1935-1947, examined how the 1930s and 1940s left popularized realism in the US, and in so doing, re-shaped the contours of American pluralism.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Jeff Sparr and Matt Kaplan join Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller on set of "Story in the Public Square"

    July 1, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    About one in five Americans live with a diagnosable mental disorder. This week’s guests, Jeff Sparr and Matt Kaplan, are creators of a program that uses storytelling and expressive arts to create peace of mind.

    Based in Rhode Island and with an international reach, the non-profit organization PeaceLove Studios promotes mental wellness and fights stigma against mental illness with the use of expressive arts. PeaceLove offers services through its centers and with outreach programs that bring the message of mental wellness and acceptance through art to schools, workplaces and other venues.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Image of the Herbert and Claiborne Pell medal for United States History on a black background.

    61 Students Awarded 2017 Pell Medal for Excellence in U.S. History

    Newport, R.I.— 61 Rhode Island students earned the Herbert and Claiborne Pell Medal for U.S. History this year. The medal, originally presented by Senator Claiborne Pell and his wife, Mrs. Nuala Pell, recognizes college and high school students in the state who have excelled in U.S. History.

    “It’s important to recognize the spark that these students have for history, their exceptional dedication to their education and the great promise they show for the future,” said Clay Pell. “I look forward to seeing them excel in the field.”

    “Russia’s intervention in our election is a stark reminder that citizens in our republic must know their history and have a good understanding of civics,” said Jim Ludes, Pell Center Executive Director.  “If we can encourage and celebrate that in Rhode Island’s schools, then I’m confident that we are making good on the legacy Senator Pell left us and protecting the future at the same time.”

    Established by the Pell family, the Pell Medal is named for Representative Herbert C. Pell and his son, Senator Claiborne Pell. Herbert Pell served as a member of Congress and American Minister to Portugal and Hungary, while Claiborne Pell, who is responsible for the creation of the Pell Grants and the National Endowment for the Humanities, served in the Senate for 36 years and worked to strengthen American foreign policy.

    The winners of the 2017 Herbert and Claiborne Pell Medal for excellence in the study of U.S. History are:

     

    Barrington

    James Coffey, St. Andrew’s School

    Mikaela Boone, Barrington High School

    Bristol

    Ashley Tatum, Mt. Hope High School

    Danielle Bernier, Roger Williams University

    Central Falls

    Marcus Baptista, Central Falls High School

    Coventry

    Tyler Ferrara, Coventry High School

    Cranston

    Nathaniel Hardy, Cranston High School East

    Cumberland

    Connor Hayden, Cumberland High School

    East Greenwhich

    Laura Murphy, East Greenwich High School

    Alec O’del, Rocky Hill School

    East Providence

    Yu Zhang, Providence Country Day School

    Andrew Rogers, East Providence High School

    Harrisville

    Elizabeth Ethier, Burrillville High School

    Johnston

    Lindsey Frein, Johnston Senior High School

    Kingston

    Alexandra Goldsmith, University of Rhode Island

    Lincoln

    Angelo Landry, Lincoln High School

    Patrick Carnaghan, William M. Davies Jr. Career & Technical High School

    Middletown

    Theodore Thibeault, Middletown High School

    North Scituate

    Jessica Sackal, Ponaganset High School

    Narragansett

    Amanda Carberry, Narragansett High School

    Justin Ramirez, The Ocean Tides School

    Newport

    Juliana DiMeglio, Rogers High School

    North Kingstown

    Josh Neronha, North Kingstown High School

    North Providence

    Casey Silva, North Providence High School

    North Smithfield

    Jay Rumas, North Smithfield High School

    Pawtucket

    Miguelangel Tineo, Blackstone Academy Charter School

    Daniel Sossa, Charles E. Shea Senior High School

    Benjamin MacDonald, Saint Raphael Academy

    Aaron Amaral, William E. Tolman High School

    Portsmouth

    Thomas Teravainen, Portsmouth Abbey School

    Emma Rainier, Portsmouth High School

    Providence

    Leah Kazar, Brown University

    Kate Marie Rodriguez, Central High School

    Daniel Licht, Classical High School

    John Larsen, La Salle Academy

    Lily Martin, Lincoln School

    Yara Doumani, Moses Brown School

    Alex Veglia, Ocean Tides School

    Edwin Lantigua, Paul Cuffee Upper School

    Hugh Thomas Kilcommons, Providence College

    Emma Lafleur, Rhode Island College

    Isabelle Rose, Rhode Island School of Design

    Destiney Fry-Daly, School One

    Eleanor Sultana, The Wheeler School

    Riverside

    Amelia Larson, St. Mary Academy Bay View

    Scituate

    Connor Elias, Scituate High School

    Smithfield

    Dominic Ferrara, Bryant University

    Simon Rees, Smithfield High School

    South Kingstown

    Braedon Kehoe, South Kingstown High School

    Tiverton

    Tova Ibbotson, Tiverton High School

    Wakefield

    Natalie Freeman, The Prout School

    Warwick

    William Provost, Bishop Hendrickson High School

    Alicia Jones, Community College of Rhode Island

    Alexandrea Pouliot, Pilgrim High School

    Hannah Senerchia, Toll Gate High School

    West Warwick

    Elizabeth Pelletier, West Warwick High School

    Westerly

    Charles Vakassian, Westerly High School

    Wood River Junction

    Christian Sardelli, Chariho High School

    Woonsocket

    Keaton Bergeron, Beacon Charter High School for the Arts

    Meghan O’Brien, Mount St. Charles Academy

    Eden Suthowski, Woonsocket High School

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