• Sunshine Menezes on set at "Story in the Public Square" with hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller

    Sunshine Menezes on “Story in the Public Square” September 23, 2017

    Science tells us that Hurricanes Harvey and Irma were stronger because of climate change. That view is politically controversial, even if it is based on sound science. Guest Sunshine Menezes helps scientists communicate more effectively.

    Sunshine Menezes, Ph.D. has served as executive director of the Metcalf Institute at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography (URI GSO) and associate director for communication in the URI GSO Office of Marine Programs since 2006.

    Prior to focusing her communication efforts on improving news coverage of the environment, she developed national and state-level environmental policy, first as a Dean John Knauss National Sea Grant Marine Policy Fellow with Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr. and later as part of a multidisciplinary team at the URI Coastal Resources Center and Rhode Island Sea Grant.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Allan A. Ryan on “Story in the Public Square” September 16, 2017

    The laws of war are intended to protect the innocent as well as combatants. Guest Allan A. Ryan argues they are also intended to provide justice after conflicts end.

    Ryan, a native of Cambridge, Massachusetts, graduated from Dartmouth College and the University of Minnesota Law School magna cum laude, where he was President of the Minnesota Law Review. He served as a captain in the United States Marine Corps and as a law clerk for Justice Byron R. White on the Supreme Court of the United States.

    Ryan practiced law with the firm of Williams & Connolly in Washington and then spent three years as Assistant to the Solicitor General of the United States, representing the United States in cases before the Supreme Court. He is also an adjunct professor of law at Boston College Law School, where he teaches the law of war, and at Harvard University Extension, where he teaches courses on constitutional law.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Jason Healey on “Story in the Public Square’” September 9, 2017

    Information technology has changed nearly everything about modern living: the way we communicate, earn a living, and even how we date.  Guest Jason Healey examines the implications of cybersecurity on war and statecraft.

    Jason Healey is a Senior Research Scholar at Columbia University’s School for International and Public Affairs specializing in cyber conflict, competition and cooperation. Prior to this, he was the founding director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative of the Atlantic Council where he remains a Senior Fellow.  He is the editor of the first history of conflict in cyberspace, A Fierce Domain: Cyber Conflict, 1986 to 2012 and co-authored the book Cyber Security Policy Guidebook by Wiley.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Photograph of a full crowd intently listening to panelists at the Laudato Si event in Bazarksy Lecture Hall.

    Fall 2017 Lecture Series Announced

    The Pell Center at Salve Regina University has announced a variety of events for the Fall 2017 semester, with topics ranging from U.S. foreign policy to women in science and technology, and many in between. Tickets to Pell Center events are free and open to the public. Please RSVP in advance for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page, and call 401-341-2927 or email pellcenter@salve.edu with any questions or concerns.

    Please note, most events this fall will take place at the Bazarsky Lecture Hall in the O’Hare Academic Center. The exception is our “Conversation with Former President Xanana Gusmão of Timor-Leste” on September 18, 2017, which will be held at 11:00 a.m. in the Young Building.

     

    Great Power Rivalry and U.S. Foreign Policy in the Trump Era

    September 13, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Panelists:

    Dr. Thomas Wright, director of the Center for the United States and Europe and a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy at the Brookings Institution

    Dr. James Goldgeier, Professor of International Relations and served as Dean of the School of International Service at American University

    On September 13th, the Pell Center will host Dr. Thomas Wright and Professor James Goldgeier for a conversation on U.S. foreign policy and great power rivalry in the Trump Era. Thomas Wright is the director of the Center on the United States and Europe and a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy at the Brookings Institution. He is also the author of All Measures Short of War: The Contest for the 21st Century and the Future of American Power, published by Yale University Press earlier this year. All Measures Short of War has been described as a “bracing antidote to simplistic thinking about complex policies,” (Publisher’s Weekly) and as an “immensely useful and lucid analysis of the current global balance of power.” (The Financial Times). Dr. Wright will provide an overview of some of the main themes of his book—the revival of great power competition, and the growing challenges to the international liberal order—before giving his assessment of how the Trump Administration has chosen to navigate this difficult geopolitical environment. Professor James Goldgeier, professor of international relations at American University and visiting senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, will serve as discussant. Dr. Iskander Rehman, senior fellow for international relations at the Pell Center, will moderate the discussion.

     

    Conversation with Former President Xanana Gusmão of Timor-Leste

    September 18, 2017, 11:00 a.m.

    Young Building, Pell Center

    Senator Claiborne Pell invested unprecedented time and energy into ending the military occupation of tiny Timor Leste, helping pave the way for the birth of Asia’s youngest democracy. Pell galvanized Rhode Island’s Portuguese-speaking communities to join him in pressing for change, even holding a Foreign Relations Committee hearing under the dome of the State House in Providence. All the while, the freedom-fighter Xanana Gusmao of Timor Leste was imprisoned in Indonesia, communicating secretly with the resistance and inspiring his fellow Timorese as “Timor Leste’s Nelson Mandela.” Senator Pell would have been proud to see the Timor Leste of today: a peaceful free, thriving democracy.

    In the last two decades, the United States has engaged around the world in trying to seed and support democracies that embrace the international system, the rule of law, and the peaceful resolution of international disputes — nowhere more successfully than in Timor Leste. The results of other American and international efforts have been decidedly mixed—some proving tremendously costly failures, while others have succeeded with little acclaim.

    Today, Timor Leste itself is at a crossroads. The clock is winding down on a novel test of dispute resolution, a first-time effort under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) to settle a maritime boundary dispute not through arbitration, but through mediation. The principals in this dispute are the young democracy of Timor-Leste and its much larger neighbor, Australia.
    Join former Timorese President Xanana Gusmão for remarks and a candid conversation about the challenges of one of the world’s youngest democracies.

     

    Warrior Women: Science and Tech Edition

    Empowering Young Women in National Security

    October 5, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Panelists:

    Dr. Andrea Limbago, Chief Social Scientist, Endgame

    Dr. Elizabeth Prescott, Director Curriculum for Science, Technology, and International Affairs, Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service

    Moderator: Jennifer McArdle, assistant professor in the Department of Administration of Justice and a Fellow in Defense Studies at the American Foreign Policy Council

    Throughout history, cycles of technological innovation have fundamentally altered society, with profound implications for national security. From the rise of artificial intelligence and autonomy, to bioengineering, and the use of cyber and information weapons, new science and technologies change the national security landscape and raise interesting policy dilemmas that the defense and national security community must grapple with.

    This second panel discussion in the Warrior Women series seeks to empower young people—particularly women—to pursue careers in national security. This panel discussion focuses specifically on science and technology careers in national security and is meant to appeal to people with traditional science and technology backgrounds, as well as those with classic liberal arts degrees. The two panelists—one a biologist by training and the other a political scientist—will discuss career opportunities in tech and national security available to young people, hurdles women experience in the field, and strategies for career success. The panel will close with a discussion of some cutting-edge tech and national security issues. A question-and-answer session will follow.

     

    The Hacked World Order and Geopolitics of Cyberspace

    October 17, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Speaker: Adam Segal, Ph.D., Ira A. Lipman Chair in Emerging Technologies Director, Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program Council on Foreign Relations

    For more than 300 years, nation-states dominated international conflict and shaped world order. They used all the instruments they had to make the rules that best served their interests.

    Two decades ago, digital technologies started to shake up that long-standing system. In 2012, the US government acknowledged that it had used these technologies to disrupt the Iranian nuclear program, and Russia and China conducted massive cyber-espionage operations. Cyberspace became a primary battlefield.

    To make matters worse, cyber attackers often hide behind proxies. Many of the latest technologies are now in the hands of big companies who have interests that differ from those in government.  Almost all our critical infrastructure is vulnerable to attack. How can we understand how states, large and small, attack, surveil, influence, steal from and trade with each other in the digital age?

     

    Avoiding a Sea of Fire: Dealing with a Nuclear-Armed North Korea

    November 7, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Speakers:

    Dr. Vipin Narang, Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Dr. Terence Roehrig is Professor of National Security Affairs, and the Director of the Asia-Pacific Studies Group at the U.S. Naval War College

    Dr. Iskander Rehman, Senior Fellow for International Relations at the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy at Salve Regina University

    In the summer of 2017, the Democratic People’s Republic of North Korea (DPRK) carried out a series of long-range missile tests. The weapon systems tested appeared to be intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), with the potential to range the continental United States. While North Korea has been a nuclear power for over a decade, this latest evolution is something of a turning point and raises a number of difficult questions. How should the United States, its Northeast Asian allies, and the international community writ large, deal with the growing threat posed by a nuclear-armed North Korea? Beyond levying additional economic sanctions, are there any non-kinetic means of persuading or compelling the regime in Pyongyang to arrest its nuclear developments? In early August, U.S. National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster claimed that the U.S. was prepared to wage “preventive war” against North Korea. What might such a grim possibility entail? How might combat operations unfold on the Korean peninsula and what is the state of North Korea’s conventional capabilities? Last but not least, what role might nuclear weapons in the DPRK’s evolving security strategy? How will the maturation of its nuclear deterrent affect its regional behavior?

    On November 7th, in an effort to help provide answers to some of these challenging questions, the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy will convene a panel of distinguished experts.

     

    A Comparative Analysis of Left, Right, and Failed Ethnic Nationalism

    November 29, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Speaker: Dr. Cedric de Leon, Associate Professor of Sociology, Tufts University

    The rise of Donald Trump is just one case of a wider phenomenon. To understand contemporary American politics we must place it in comparative context. This presentation will put Trump’s economic nationalism alongside the rise of the BJP in India, the MAS in Bolivia, and the Reform Party in Canada.

  • David K. Jones on the set of "Story in the Public Square."

    David K. Jones on “Story in the Public Square” September 2, 2017

    The politics of the healthcare debate seem to have ground to a halt in Washington—at least for now. But guest David Jones reminds us that the healthcare needs of the public still face substantial challenges.

    Jones is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Law, Policy and Management at Boston University’s School of Public Health. He is Editor-in-Chief of www.PublicHealthPost.org, an online forum for public health policy launched in November 2016. David earned a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in Health Services, Organizations, and Policy. He holds a Master of Arts (MA) in Political Science from the University of Michigan, a Master of Science in Public Health (MSPH) from the University of North Carolina, and a Bachelor of Arts (BA) from McGill University.

    His research examines the politics of health reform and the social determinants of health. Exchange Politics: Opposing Obamacare in Battleground States, his forthcoming book from Oxford University Press, focuses on how states made decisions around what type of health insurance exchange to establish as part of the Affordable Care Act’s implementation. Jones is working on a new book using Photovoice to examine the social determinants of health in the Mississippi Delta, re-tracing Robert Kennedy’s steps in the region.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Tim Gray on the set of "Story in the Public Square"

    Tim Gray on “Story in the Public Square” August 26, 2017

    One of the biggest Hollywood block-busters this summer is about the earliest days of World War II. Guest Tim Gray is an acclaimed chronicler of the Americans who defeated the Axis Powers and saved civilization.

    Gray is a national award-winning documentary film director, producer and writer based in Rhode Island. Tim has produced and directed 20 documentary films to date on the personal stories of the World War II generation. All of Grays’s films air nationally on American Public Television and also globally in such countries as China, Australia, France and England.

    In 2012, Gray’s World War II Foundation also dedicated the Richard D. Winters Leadership Monument in Normandy, France, a project honoring American leadership on D-Day and approved by the late Major Richard D. Winters of WWII’s Band of Brothers.

    To see all of Gray’s WWII documentary films, click here.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • John Marttila on the set of "Story in the Public Square" with Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller.

    John Marttila on “Story in the Public Square” August 19, 2017

    Storytelling is at the heart of political campaigns. Guest John Marttila has studied those stories as part of a four-decade career in American politics.

    For more than forty years, Marttila has been a leading political strategist and advisor for political candidates, elected officials and ballot campaigns. In 1972, he co-founded his first company, which oversaw the strategy and produced advertising for Vice President Joe Biden’s upset senatorial victory.

    Marttila was a senior advisor to John Kerry’s 2004 presidential campaign and Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick’s 2006 campaign. In 1996, Marttila’s company became more active internationally, conducting research and advising political campaigns in Russia, Israel, Hungary and Greece.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Pell Center Receives Grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York to Host Franco-U.S. Defense Dialogue

    Newport, RI – The Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy at Salve Regina University has received a $200,000 grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York to support the Rochambeau Dialogue over a period of two years.

    Named after one of the most celebrated French commanders of the Revolutionary War, the Rochambeau Dialogue will be an important programmatic effort designed to strengthen defense cooperation between the United States and its oldest ally—France. This will take the form of an annual Franco-U.S. defense dialogue, held in Newport, Rhode Island on the campus of Salve Regina University over the course of two days. Led by Pell Center Senior Fellow Iskander Rehman, and in partnership with a leading French think-tank, the Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique (FRS), the dialogue will serve as a forum for discussion with the participation of current and former French and American government officials.

    Rehman said that “at a time of transatlantic turmoil, initiatives such as these take on a whole new importance. It is our hope that the Rochambeau Dialogue will strengthen the fraternal bond between both republics, and raise awareness among French and American audiences of the enduring value of the alliance.”

    Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes praised the initiative and thanked Carnegie Corporation of New York for their support. “With the threats to liberal democracies on the rise,” Ludes said, “we’re eager to get to work to foster this important dialogue, and we are very grateful to the Corporation for the grant to make this effort possible.”

    Bruno Tertrais, the Deputy Director of the Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique (FRS) added that, “FRS is thrilled to be a partner in this much-needed venture. At a time when the U.S. and France are more than ever key Western defense and security partners, this new strategic dialogue will help promote mutual knowledge and understanding as well as facilitate cooperation.”

    “We hope the Rochambeau Dialogue will have a positive impact for years to come,” said Vartan Gregorian, President of Carnegie Corporation of New York. “It is our privilege to provide a grant for this thoughtful, timely, and worthwhile endeavor.”

  • Casey Michel on set at "Story in the Public Square"

    Casey Michel on “Story in the Public Square” August 5, 2017

    The national security community has warned us that Russia’s meddling in the 2016 presidential election is only a preview of what Russia might do in the 2018 and 2020 elections. Casey Michel argues that Russian intervention in American public life is even more serious, now, than even that dire prediction.

    Michel has worked as a journalist in both the U.S. and the former Soviet Union. He graduated with a Master’s degree from the Harriman Institute at Columbia University and a bachelor’s from Rice University.

    Michel is the author of “How the American Right Learned to Love Moscow in the Era of Trump,” a study published for “People for the American Way” that examines the relations between Russia and the American far-right. He is currently authoring the Crossroads Asia vertical and writing magazine pieces for The Diplomat. Michel’s pieces have appeared in numerous publications, including Foreign Policy, The Atlantic, POLITICO Magazine, and more.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Eve L. Ewing sits on set at "Story in the Public Square,"

    Eve L. Ewing on “Story in the Public Square” July 29, 2017

    Race in American life is still a very powerful force. Eve L. Ewing explores its potency in her scholarship and bears often personal witness to it in her art and in her poetry.

    Dr. Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. She is a Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Chicago; in 2018, she will begin as Assistant Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago.

    Ewing has two books forthcoming, including Electric Arches – an imaginative exploration of black girlhood and womanhood through poetry, visual art, and narrative prose set to publish on September 5, 2017. The second, When the Bell Stops Ringing: Race, History and Discourse amid Chicago’s School Closures, is expected from University of Chicago Press in fall 2018 and explores the relationship between the closing of public schools and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago’s Bronzeville community. She is also a fellow at the Center for Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago and a Civic Media Fellow at the Annenberg Innovation Lab at the University of Southern California.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

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