• Daphne Matziaraki on “Story in the Public Square” June 24, 2017

    Each year, the Pell Center at Salve Regina University presents the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square to a storyteller whose work makes a vital contribution to the public dialogue. This year, we honor Daphne Matziaraki, a documentary filmmaker who reminds us of our shared humanity.

    Born and raised in Greece, Daphne Matziaraki holds a bachelor’s degree in politics and sociology from the University of Bristol, United Kingdom; a master’s in international relations from the University of Bristol; and a masters in journalism (documentary filmmaking) from the University of California, Berkeley. Matziaraki has worked as a radio, television and multi-media journalist in America and Greece. She lives now in the San Francisco Bay area.

    Matziaraki directed, produced, photographed and edited “4.1 Miles,” first published by The New York Times. The documentary was nominated for an Academy Award and won a Peabody Award, among other honors. “4.1 Miles” depicts a Hellenic Coast Guard captain and crew from the island of Lesbos who, against odds, undertake many missions to attempt to save thousands of children, women and men who are attempting to cross the Aegean Sea to Greece as the European migrant crisis unfolds. Shot in the tradition of cinéma vérité, its cinematography and graphic presentation of life-and-death drama distinguish the film.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Daphne Matziaraki Accepts the 2017 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

    Newport, R.I. – Standing in front of a sold-out audience on June 5, 2017, documentary filmmaker Daphne Matziaraki accepted the 2017 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square. The prize, awarded annually since 2013, honors a storyteller whose work has significantly influenced the public dialogue.

    Matziaraki, whose short documentary “4.1 Miles” was nominated for an Academy Award, returned to her native Greece to capture footage of the refugee crisis on a Coast Guard boat off the island of Lesbos.

    Screened in Newport, Rhode Island, the 21 minute and 20 second film played in front of an audience that largely had never been exposed to such a grave human crisis. Matziaraki drew parallels between coastal Lesbos, Greece, at the epicenter of her film and the flood of refugees escaping conflict by inflatable rafts and boats, and the seaside community of Newport, Rhode Island. “The only knowledge [the citizens of Lesbos] had of the situation was through the news, and suddenly the news came to their doorstep in such a violent way,” said Matziaraki.

    Lacking adequate supplies and proper training, the citizens nevertheless dropped everything to assist the refugees when they hit the shore – and Matziaraki was there to Daphne Matziaraki, a Greek documentary filmmaker, at the podium at Salve Regina University.document it. “This big shipwreck happens and everyone from the village comes out to help, and religion doesn’t matter, and political beliefs don’t matter, because life and death is the same for all people, for all mothers, for all children.”

    Matziaraki explained to a misty-eyed audience that the film is not intended to be a call to action, and refused to endorse any particular relief organization: “I think it’s up to every one of us to research and see where and how we would like to help.” She repeatedly recognized the sacrifices that men and women, like Coast Guard captain Kyriakos Papadopoulos and his crew, make to save desperate refugees without adequate support, equipment or training.

    In presenting the Pell Center prize for her meaningful contribution to public dialogue, Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes praised Matziaraki for the power of her work. “We feel empathy for the children and adults who are literally fleeing for their lives, at extreme risk of death,” he said. “We feel these people’s fears – and the hope that drives them. We admire the captain and his crew, who themselves face risk in saving strangers—and who challenge us to look within and ask what are we personally doing for the refugees in our world?”

    G. Wayne Miller, director of the Story in the Public Square initiative and a journalist with The Providence Journal, celebrated the film. “It connects on the deepest level, on a very deep emotional level, which is really where change can begin,” he said. “You have to feel this, you have to experience this in your heart, and I think we did.”

    Matziaraki previously reported from humanitarian emergencies in Africa and Europe, and now lives in the San Francisco bay area. On June 24, 2017, she will be a featured guest on “Story in the Public Square,” the Pell Center’s public affairs radio and television show. “Story in the Public Square” airs weekly on SiriusXM P.O.T.U.S. (channel 124) as well as Rhode Island PBS.

    Founded in 2012, Story in the Public Square is an initiative to celebrate, study and tell stories that matter. A partnership of the Pell Center and The Providence Journal, the program sponsors public seminars and discussions, annually names a local and national story of the year, and is guided by a culturally and creatively diverse Story Board.

  • Llewellyn King

    Llewellyn King Joins Pell Center as Senior Adjunct Fellow

    Newport, R.I – The Pell Center at Salve Regina University has named Llewellyn King, an accomplished journalist, columnist, and host as well as executive producer of “White House Chronicle,” as its newest Adjunct Senior Fellow.

    “White House Chronicle,” now in its 20th year, blends King’s sharp wit and keen insights about politics and policy into a weekly look at public affairs. It was groundbreaking television when it first aired, and continues to illuminate the public dialogue.  “White House Chronicle” can be seen nationwide on 200 PBS and public, educational, and government (PEG) cable access television stations, and the commercial AMGTV Network. The program also airs worldwide on the Voice of America and can be heard each weekend on SiriusXM’s P.O.T.U.S. Channel 124.

    As a veteran journalist, and columnist—whose weekly column is distributed by the InsideSources syndicate—King has built a reputation for real expertise on his native continent of Africa, the energy industry, international politics, and, of course, American politics. His articles have appeared in Time, the BBC, The Washington Post, and more. A collection of King’s op-ed columns and commentaries titled, “Washington and the World – 2001-2005,” was published in 2006.

    King was the founder of “The Energy Daily,” the flagship newsletter of his award-winning King Publishing Group.  The group’s other publications included “Defense Week,” “New Technology Week,” “Navy News & Undersea Technology,” and “White House Weekly.”  King Publishing Group was sold in 2006.

    “Llewellyn King’s accomplishments as a journalist speak for themselves,” said Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes. “Very rare is the journalist who has been invited to lecture to America’s best energy scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, but that’s who Llewellyn King is. We look forward to tapping that expertise for programs and opportunities at the Pell Center.”

    Ludes also expressed gratitude for King’s support in the development of “Story in the Public Square,” the public affairs program produced by the Pell Center. “I met Llewellyn a couple of years ago when he invited me to appear on ‘White House Chronicle,’” said Ludes. “We became fast friends, and Llewellyn and his wife Linda Gasparello mentored our efforts to create a ‘Story in the Public Square’ show for broadcast at a critical moment in our development. They gave us advice and encouragement, and they gave us air time on their own show. We learned so much from them, and we’re grateful.”

  • Thomas Patterson

    June 17, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    The media’s role in modern American politics is that of investigator, arbitrator, and even king maker. Guest Thomas Patterson argues that, contrary to popular belief, media bias is not about left and right, but about positive and negative.

    Patterson is Bradlee Professor of Government and the Press at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is the author of Informing the News: The Need for Knowledge-Based Journalism, The Vanishing Voter, Out of Order, and The Unseeing Eye, among many others.

    Patterson’s articles have appeared in Political Communication, Journal of Communication, and other academic journals, as well as in the popular press.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • June 10, 2017 “Story in the Public Square”

    Music and art, like storytelling, are distinctively human creations. Guest Joseph “Butch” Rovan works in both media to tell stories, challenge assumptions, and explore our humanity.

    Joseph Butch Rovan is the faculty director of the Brown Arts Initiative (BAI), a new program at Brown University that supports forward-thinking and cutting-edge artists – including those whose work responds to contemporary issues and creates awareness of them.

    In addition to directing the BAI, Rovan is a composer, media artist and performer on the faculty of the Department of Music at Brown University. He also co-directs the MEME (Multimedia & Electronic Music Experiments) program in Computer Music. Before joining academia, he was a member of a Southern California rock band.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • June 3, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    In the aftermath of the Second World War, political leaders built a global system of free trade because they believed it was crucial to world peace.  Like so much of the post-war order, that belief is under assault in the 21st century. Guest Karen Tramontano argues that free trade agreements can serve their original purpose even while helping workers.

    Karen Tramontano is currently the CEO and co-founder of Blue Star Strategies, LLC, which provides corporate, institutional and public sector clients with results-oriented strategies. Ms. Tramontano is also the Founder and President of the Global Fairness Initiative (GFI), a non-profit organization working to promote a more equitable, sustainable approach to globalization to ensure its benefits reach all people, including the working poor.

    Ms. Tramontano is the author of “Tearing Up Trade Agreements Won’t Help Workers: A More Responsible Approach Just May,” a Pell Center study published last year in which she lays out an ambitious approach to trade. Building on the “good” in recent trade pacts, Tramontano describes an approach with three critical elements: a more robust social safety net for American workers who lose their jobs due to trade; labor rights protections for American workers and for workers in trading partners to level the playing field; and integration of the benefits of trade into the discussion of foreign assistance.

    Ms. Tramontano previously served in the White House as deputy chief of staff to President William Jefferson Clinton. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Fair Labor Association and is a lecturer in the Executive Master of European and International Business Law program at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. She earned a Juris Doctor degree from Catholic University Law School and a B.A. from Boston College.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • John Aloysius Farrell on set

    “Story in the Public Square” May 27, 2017

    With allegations of a cover-up and obstruction of justice circulating in Washington, Americans in 2017 are looking to the presidency of Richard Nixon for precedent and understanding. Our guest, John Farrell, literally wrote the book on Nixon’s life after his own career covering politics in Washington, DC.

    John Farrell is the author of Richard Nixon: The Life, the best-selling and widely critically acclaimed biography of the 37th president of the United States. Farrell is a contributing editor to Politico Magazine, after a prize-winning career as a newspaperman, most notably at The Denver Post and The Boston Globe, where he worked as White House correspondent and served on the vaunted Spotlight team.

    Farrell has covered Congress, the Supreme Court and every American presidential campaign from 1980 through 2012. He has served as Washington bureau chief for The Denver Post, and the MediaNews chain. Farrell graduated from the University of Virginia, and has served as a guest lecturer for classes at Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the United States Military Academy, Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and other universities and colleges.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • May 20, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    After the 2008 election of President Barack Obama, Time Magazine asked if we had entered a post-racial America. From the perspective of 2017, the question seems ridiculous. Tricia Rose argues, in fact, that structural racism is the key driver of inequality in the United States.

    Rose is currently Chancellor’s Professor of Africana Studies and the Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University. Rose also serves as Associate Dean of the Faculty for Special Initiatives. She is an internationally respected scholar of post civil rights era black U.S. culture, popular music, social issues, gender and sexuality.

    Rose graduated from Yale University where she received a B.A. in Sociology and then received her Ph.D. from Brown University in American Studies.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • May 13, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    Despite decades of consistent warning from the scientific community, the American public remains divided on the issue of climate change.  Yale University’s Anthony Leiserowitz says there are six Americas in the climate debate—and you cannot communicate with each one in the same way.

    Anthony Leiserowitz, Ph.D. is a Senior Research Scientist at the Yale University School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and Director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. Dr. Leiserowitz is the host of “Climate Connections,” a nationally syndicated radio program and podcast.

    Dr. Leiserowitz is an expert on American and international public opinion on global warming, including public perception of climate change risks, support and opposition for climate policies, and willingness to make individual behavioral change. His research investigates the psychological, cultural, political, and geographic factors that drive public environmental perception and behavior.

    Dr. Leiserowitz can be found on Twitter @ecotone2.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Senior Fellow Francesca Spidalieri Named to New Cohort of Transatlantic Digital Debates Fellows

    Francesca Spidalieri, Senior Fellow for Cyber Leadership at the Pell Center at Salve Regina University, has been selected as a fellow for the 2017 Transatlantic Digital Debates (TDD) program.

    The TDD program is a joint initiative of the Global Public Policy Institute (GPPi) in Germany and New America, a Washington, DC, based think-tank. Together, the two organizations bring a select group of young professionals together from their respective countries to work on key challenges that sit at the intersection of technology, policy, economics, and law. For the second round of the program, the TDD steering committee has selected 18 exceptional individuals who cover various angles of tech policy and represent the public sector, civil society, business, and academia. The new fellows will come together during a series of meetings in Germany and the United States to discuss different policy questions with regards to innovation and regulation in the digital economy, as well as the relationship between cybersecurity and privacy issues, including emerging cybersecurity threats and the challenges that come with increasing automation, connectivity, and the growing use of algorithms.

    The Transatlantic Digital Debates foster dialogue among future decision-makers to build more long-term transatlantic cooperation in the digital age. Through workshops and conversations with leading decision-makers and experts from various sectors, the fellows engage in open and provocative discussions on the best approaches to shaping our rapidly changing digital societies and economies. “This fantastic program brings together experts from both sides of the Atlantic to enhance transatlantic political discussions and help develop best approaches to the challenges of our increasingly connected and digitally-dependent societies,” said Spidalieri.  “I am thrilled to join this incredible network.”

    Dr. Jim Ludes, Executive Director of the Pell Center, said, “We are proud of Francesca for all that she has done to build an international reputation for her work on cybersecurity here at the Pell Center.  She’s achieved so much already, so we’re not surprised that she would receive this kind of recognition.  We know Francesca will learn a lot during her time as a TDD fellow, she’ll contribute to their deliberations, and, ultimately, she’ll bring those insights back to the important work she does at the Pell Center.”

    You can follow Francesca on Twitter @Francesca-cyber and use #TDD2017 to follow the program and stay up-to-date on the fellows’ blog posts and podcasts. For more information about the program, visit http://www.transatlanticdigitaldebates.net.  For more information on the Pell Center’s Cyber Leadership Program, visit http://pellcenter.org/cyber-leadership/.

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