• Eric Bennett on set of Story in the Public Square

    February 25, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    This week, hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller are joined by a remarkably talented scholar and novelist whose work, whether for academic or popular audiences, traces the role of both narrative and truth in public life.

    Eric Bennett is the author of Workshops of Empire: Stegner, Engle, and American Creative Writing during the Cold War, and the novel A Big Enough Lie.  His fiction has appeared in A Public Space and Lumina, and his nonfiction in the New York Times, The New Yorker, The Chronicle of Higher Education, VQR, and Modern Fiction Studies.  He received an MFA in fiction writing from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a Ph.D. in English from Harvard University.  He is an associate professor at Providence College in Rhode Island.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows pose on steps of the capitol building

    Salve Regina University’s Class of 2020 Invited to Apply for Leadership Program

    Students from Salve Regina’s Class of 2020 are invited to apply for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Named in honor of the late Nuala Pell, the wife of Senator Claiborne Pell and an avid supporter of service, the Nuala Pell Leadership Development Program aims to build students’ leadership skills for the classroom, on campus, and beyond.

    Twelve students from the Class of 2020 who demonstrate a commitment to developing their leadership skills will be selected to participate in the program.

    Students in the program will attend monthly seminars, participate in an off-campus leadership trip, and engage with accomplished leaders throughout their sophomore year at Salve. Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows have met with a variety of leaders including Rhode Island’s delegation to the US Congress, the Rhode Island Secretary of State, a Navy admiral, a vice president of National Grid, a state superior court judge, Salve’s President, and the Ambassador to the US from Liechtenstein.

    As part of the program, students work in groups to propose, design, and execute their own service projects. They also shadow an individual leader and present on that leadership experience.

    Applicants must have at least a 3.5 GPA as of September 2017 and must be able to attend all meetings of the group. All majors are encouraged to apply.

    To apply, students must complete the following requirements:

    • A Statement of Interest (400-500 words) must be submitted (via email to Chelsea.Buffington@salve.edu) by March 9th, and should indicate why you are interested in the program, interest or experience with leadership, and how you anticipate using leadership skills in the future.
    • Each applicant must identify and ask a Salve Regina faculty or staff member to submit a nomination by March 9th. Nominations may be sent to Chelsea.Buffington@salve.edu.

    Selected applicants will be asked to participate in an interview.

    Students will be notified of their provisional acceptance the week of April 14th. Selected students will be expected to attend a reception for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program on the evening of Tuesday, April 25, 2017.

  • Katherine Brown on set of Story in the Public Square

    February 18, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    With the transfer of power in Washington, the stories the United States tells the world are changing, too.  Hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller are joined this week by Katherine Brown, a public diplomacy professional who has served the United States from the corridors of Foggy Bottom to Kabul, Afghanistan.

    Dr. Brown is a 2016-2017 International Affairs Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). From 2013-2016, she served as the Executive Director of the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy at the U.S. Department of State, an office authorized by Congress to appraise and strengthen U.S. engagement activities with foreign citizens. During that time, she revitalized the Commission into an effective watchdog and advocacy platform for federal public diplomacy policy.

    Jim-Ludes,-Katherine-Brown,-G.-Wayne-MillerDr. Brown received her Ph.D. in Communications from Columbia University in 2013 and is currently an adjunct faculty member at Georgetown University’s Security Studies Program.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

     

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Marc Smerling on set of Story in the Public Square

    February 11, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    Politicians and voters may hate crime, but American audiences can’t get enough of shows like CSI or Law and Order.  This week on “Story in the Public Square,” hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller are joined by Marc Smerling, an Emmy-winning filmmaker who has intimately chronicled some of America’s most notorious criminals.

    Smerling is an award-winning writer, screen producer and cinematographer – and most recently, writer, producer and co-host with filmmaker Zac Stuart-Pontier of the new podcast series, “Crimetown.”

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes moderates the lecture about Pope Francis' encyclical letter as panelists Craig Condella, Deb Curtis, Jayme Hennessy, Susan Meschwitz and Chad Raymond look out upon a crowd of Salve students and Newport community members

    Spring 2017 Lecture Series Announced

    Today the Pell Center announced our Spring 2017 event series. Tickets to Pell Center events are free. Please RSVP in advance for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page, and call 401-341-2927 or email pellcenter@salve.edu with any questions or concerns.

    Please note, most events this spring will take place at the Bazarsky Lecture Hall in the O’Hare Academic Center. The exception is our March 28, 2017 event, “Rockin’ the Free World,” which will take place at the DiStefano Lecture Hall in the Antone Academic Center.

     

    The 1916 Easter Rising and the Origins of Modern Irregular Warfare

    February 15, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Dr. Timothy D. Hoyt, John Nicholas Brown Chair of Counterterrorism, U.S. Naval War College

    On April 24, 1916 (Easter Monday), Irish rebels seized key locations in downtown Dublin and declared an independent Irish Republic.  The “Easter Rising” ended in ignominious defeat, but also marked a new stage in Ireland’s struggle for national independence.  Lessons learned from the Rising contributed directly to the success of Irish rebels in the Anglo-Irish War of 1919-1921.  They also served as a model for future anti-colonial and independence struggles around the globe later in the 20th century.

    RSVP here.

     

    Racial Equity: What is the Call to Action for Higher Education?

    Thursday, March 2, 2017, 7:30 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Bethany Johnson-Javois, CEO of the St. Louis Integrated Health Network

    Bethany Johnson-Javois, Former Ferguson Commission Managing Director and CEO of the St. Louis Integrated Health Network will engage with attendees to re-connect with their leadership purpose and reflect on lessons learned from her work to address community-level trauma and toxic stress spurred by the events in Ferguson, MO on August 9, 2014. Ms. Johnson-Javois will outline a series of calls to action for higher education that offer a path to what generational change will require, using the lens of racial equity.

    This event is in partnership with Salve Regina University’s Office of Multicultural Programs and Retention. Bethany Johnson-Javois’ visit is supported by a grant from the Davis Educational Foundation, established by Stanton and Elizabeth Davis after Mr. Davis’s retirement as chairman of Shaw’s Supermarkets, Inc.

    RSVP here.  

     

    The Future of U.S. Asia Policy Under a Trump Administration

    Thursday, March 21, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Panelists:

    • Isaac Stone Fish, Senior Fellow, Asia Society
    • Dr. Tanvi Madan, Director of the India Project, Brookings Institution
    • Jeff Smith, Director of Asian Security Programs, American Foreign Policy Council

    Moderator: Dr. Iskander Rehman, Senior Fellow, Pell Center

    A panel of distinguished experts will discuss the future of the U.S. Asia Policy under a Trump Administration. In the course of the moderated discussion, the panelists will discuss issues such as the threats posed to freedom of navigation in the Asian maritime commons, the future of the US-India relationship, and perceptions of the new U.S. administration and of its Asia policy from different Asian capitals, including Beijing. The presentations will be followed by a short Q and A with the audience.

    RSVP here.

     

    Rockin’ the Free World

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    DiStefano Lecture Hall

    Dr. Sean Kay, Professor in the Department of Politics and Government, Ohio Wesleyan

    In Rockin’ the Free World, international relations expert Sean Kay takes readers inside “Bob Dylan’s America” and shows how this vision linked the rock and roll revolution to American values of freedom, equality, human rights, and peace while tracing how those values have spread globally. Rockin’ the Free World then shows how artists have engaged in advancing change via opportunity and education; domestic and international issue advocacy; and within the recording and broader communications industry. The book is built around primary interviews with prominent American and international performing artists ranging from Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees and Grammy winners to regional and local musicians. The interviews include leading industry people, management, journalists, heads of non-profits, and activists. The book concludes with a look at how musical artists have defined the American experience and what that has meant for the world.

    RSVP here.

     

    Unconditional Surrender: The Failure of Peace Negotiations in the American Civil War

    John E. McGinty Lecture in History

    April 20, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    James M. McPherson, George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton University and Pulitzer Prize-winning author

    Most wars in American history have been ended by peace negotiations that led to a treaty between the contending parties: the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, the Spanish-American War, World War I, even in some respects the Vietnam War.  The two major exceptions are the Civil War and World War II, which ended in unconditional surrender and the utter destruction of the losing side’s government and political structure.  The lecture will discuss the various efforts for a negotiated peace during the Civil War and will analyze why they failed–indeed, why they really had no chance to succeed.

    RSVP here.

     

    Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War – Film Screening & Discussion

    Monday, April 24, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    “Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War,” a film directed by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky, tells the story of Waitstill and Martha Sharp, a Unitarian Minister and his wife from Wellesley, Massachusetts who spent nearly two years on life-threatening missions in Europe. The couple left their children behind in the care of their parish to help save political dissidents and Jewish refugees fleeing the Nazi occupation across Europe.

    This lecture is in partnership with Touro Synagogue.

    RSVP here.

     

     

  • Professor Jonathan Alexandratos on set of Story in the Public Square

    February 4, 2017 – “Story in the Public Square”

    How we play and how we teach our children to play are tremendously important narratives in public life. Jonathan Alexandratos argues that “toys are texts,” and we should read them with the same analytical eye we bring to books, movies, songs, and other media.

    Jonathan Alexandratos is a playwright and professor of English at Queensborough Community College in New York City. His edited collection of academic essays on the narrative in toys is titled “Articulating the Action Figure: Essays on the Toys and Their Messages,” and will be out in May of 2017 from McFarland.IMG_5245

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Dan Fagin on set of Story in the Public Square

    January 28, 2017: “Story in the Public Square”

    Science is simultaneously celebrated, ignored, and criticized in public life. In this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller sit down with Pulitzer-Prize winning science journalist Dan Fagin to better understand the power of science to explain the world around us, whether we like what it’s telling us, or not.

    Dan Fagin's Book Cover 2Dan Fagin is the director of the Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, in which he teaches Environmental Reporting and Current Topics in Science, Health and Environmental Journalism. He is also the founder and director of the Science Communication Workshops at NYU.

    Awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction, Dan’s latest book, Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation, was described by The New York Times as “a new classic in science reporting.”

    This week’s episode is supported by The Pulitzer Prize Committee and the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities, whose commemoration of the centennial of the Pulitzer Prize is RICH_marksexploring the changing nature of journalism and the humanities in the digital age.  Their project, “What is the 21st Century Essay?” focuses on environmental issues because of their urgency and relevance to our health, communities, and the economy.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • collaboration between the pell center and the newport county chamber of commerce

    Pell Center Partners with Newport County Chamber of Commerce

    Newport, R.I. ­­­­­­­­­­– The Pell Center at Salve Regina University’s Cyber Leadership Initiative is partnering with the Newport County Chamber of Commerce to promote cybersecurity and help small and medium-size enterprises prepare for the increasing growth, volume, and sophistication of cyber threats.

    The partnership will continue collaborative events as part of the Pell Center’s Rhode Island Corporate Cybersecurity Initiative (RICCI) and will aim to educate Newport County’s business leaders about cyber preparedness and cyber risk management.  RICCI, now it its fourth consecutive year, was designed to develop senior business leaders and decision makers who can affect change and make Rhode Island’s business community and critical industries safer, more resilient, and prepared to confront emerging threats.

    “We are excited to partner with the Pell Center on this extremely important initiative.  While all businesses need to take precautions to protect themselves from cyber threats, small businesses are particularly vulnerable.  The Pell Center’s expertise on these matters are a tremendous asset to the local economy and offering their services and workshops to our members will prove to be a tremendous resource in helping businesses to prepare and protect themselves into the future as these threats and attacks continue to become more prominent,” stated Erin Donovan-Boyle, executive director of the Newport County Chamber of Commerce.

    “Cyber risks affect all industries and all markets and can represent an existential threat – especially to smaller companies that have limited resources and have often built their entire business around one line of products or services,” said Francesca Spidalieri, Senior Fellow for Cyber Leadership at the Pell Center. “As small businesses continue to take advantage of technology innovations – from cloud services and industrial automation to social media and online advertisement – in order to promote efficiency, productivity, and economic growth, they must also be able to protect an expanding attack surface and mitigate a growing number of cyber threats.”

    “The Pell Center is part of a remarkable community, and we welcome the opportunity to connect with the local businesses in our neighborhood on an issue as timely and important as cybersecurity,” said Jim Ludes, executive director of the Pell Center. “Erin Donovan-Boyle has made great strides in helping Newport County’s businesses succeed in their ventures and we’re excited to work with her.”

    The Newport County Chamber of Commerce helps its members succeed through legislative advocacy, economic development, education, savings, networking and increased visibility.

    For more on upcoming RICCI events, please click here.

     

  • Loren Spears and Christian Hopkins on set of Story in the Public Square

    January 21, 2017: “Story in the Public Square”

    One of the big stories of the last six months has been the protest over the Dakota Access Pipeline.  This week on “Story in the Public Square,” two Native American activists talk about events on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation and the role of storytelling in native culture.

    Lorén Spears is a Narragansett educator, author, artist, oral historian and executive director of the Tomaquag Museum in Exeter, R.I., dedicated to the preservation and celebration of Narragansett and Native American history and culture.

    Christian Hopkins is a Native American activist and entrepreneur. A recent business graduate from Haskell Indian Nations University, he traveled to Cannonball, North Dakota, to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, protecting their water and supporting their voice in opposition against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Tom Nichols on set of Story in the Public Square

    January 14, 2017: “Story in the Public Square”

    *Rebroadcast April 15-16, 2017*

    The United States finds itself in the midst of an information war with an old adversary.  This week, national security analyst Tom Nichols will help us understand the contours of that conflict, the role of storytelling in it, and also the implications of what he calls “the death of expertise.”

    Nichols is a professor of National Security Affairs at the Naval War College, a former Jeopardy champion, and author of the soon to be published book The Death of Expertise.

    “Russian information operations in the U.S. election are the most visible examples of storytelling’s impact on public affairs today. Tom Nichols brings a lifetime of study and thought to a lively conversation about the challenges facing the United States and what we can do to meet them,” said Jim Ludes, executive director.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 1:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

     

Page 4 of 9« First...23456...Last »