• IMG_3765

    May 15, 2016: “Story in the Public Square”

    NEWPORT, R.I. – Brian Goldner, chairman, president and CEO of giant toy- and game-maker Hasbro, Inc., will be the guest this weekend on “White House Chronicle: Story in the Public Square.”

    Goldner runs the $4.45-billion company that markets and sells Monopoly, Nerf, Transformers, Star Wars, Disney, Marvel and other house brands and licensed products. But more than that, Hasbro projects influence inside millions of homes across the planet – and it is this unusual role, among other issues, that “Story in the Public Square” hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller explore with Goldner in this weekend’s episode.

    “Hasbro is the oldest major toy and game company in the world and the second-largest in terms of revenue, but more than that, its products – unlike, say, soft drinks or shoes – can play a significant role in the psycho-social development of children,” said Miller. “And that is one of the major issues we asked Goldner to discuss: how he and his Rhode Island-based firm manage what can only be called a sacred public trust. His response proved enlightening.”IMG_3780 cropped

    Goldner also talks about the use of narrative storytelling in the toy, TV and film industries; the challenges of running a global toy company; and the research with parents, children, internal staff and outside experts that goes into development of hundreds of products for all age groups, from baby to grown-up.

    Previous guests on “White House Chronicle: Story in the Public Square” include New York Times staff writer and best-selling author Dan Barry, whose latest book, “The Boys in the Bunkhouse,” will be published on May 17; Tricia Rose, Professor of Africana Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University and author of “Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America” and “The Hip Hop Wars”; and August Cole, co-author of “Ghost Fleet,” a former journalist with the Wall Street Journal, and most recently a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council.

    “White House Chronicle” airs nationwide on some 200 PBS and public, educational and governmental (PEG) access stations; and worldwide on Voice of America Television and Radio. An audio version of the program airs four times weekends on SiriusXM Radio’s popular POTUS (Politics of the United States), Channel 124: Saturdays at 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 1 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ET.

    In Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts, the program airs Sundays at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS, Digital 36.1, and other carriers; and 7 p.m. Sunday on PBS Learn, Digital 36.2, and other carriers.
    Story in the Public Square is a partnership of The Pell Center at Salve Regina University and the Providence Journal. Ludes is executive director of The Pell Center and Journal Staff Writer Miller directs the Story in the Public Square program.

    Locally, the broadcast will be aired on Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS (WSBE).

     

  • Head shot of Dr. Martha McCann Rose wearing a pink jacket and smiling at the camera.

    Podcast: Martha Rose

    Dr. Martha Rose, Salve Regina professor and faculty fellow at the Pell Center, joins Dr. Jim Ludes to discuss issues in education, from high-stakes testing to services for students with Autism.

     

     

     

  • Photograph of the 2016-2017 Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows at the Pell Center.

    Nuala Pell Leadership Program Selects Fellows for 2016-2017

    Newport, R.I. – Fourteen rising sophomores at Salve Regina University have been selected for an innovative leadership development program run by the Pell Center. Named in honor of the wife of U.S. Senator Claiborne Pell, the Nuala Pell Leadership Program builds student leaders for the twenty-first century.

    “In the first two years of the program, our student fellows have impressed us with their commitment, their desire to grow as leaders, and their potential to change the world,” said Chelsea Buffington, program director. “We expect great things from this year’s group, too.”

    The 2016-2017 cohort of Nuala Pell Leadership Program fellows include:

    • Toyosi Akanji, Chemistry, Cranston, RI
    • Cassidy Chapman, Global Business, Douglas, MA
    • Alexandra Correia, Administration of Justice, Fall River, MA
    • Jacquelyn Cutts, Religious & Theological Studies and Philosophy, Anaheim, CA
    • Daniel Donnelly, Chemistry, Portsmouth, RI
    • Michaela Lacerra, Nursing, Marlborough, MA
    • Evie O’Callaghan, Business Administration, Lancaster, United Kingdom
    • Sydnee Odei-Ntiri, Cultural & Historic Preservation and History, New Haven, CT
    • Tristen Perez, Administration of Justice, Framingham, MA
    • Grayce Rogers, History, Osterville, MA
    • Brian Schmidt, Nursing, Mansfield, MA
    • Andrew Siaba, Financial Management, Natick, MA
    • Kate Vitagliano, Psychology, Guilford, CT
    • Kendall Wilcox, Administration of Justice, Pomfret, CT

    The Nuala Pell Leadership Program includes monthly meetings where students engage in topics ranging from leadership theory and leadership ethics to managing change and vision mapping. Students meet with invited leaders to learn specific attributes of successful leaders. In 2016, Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows will travel to the nation’s capital where they will participate in group meetings with a wide variety of leaders and engage in team-building exercises. Each student will also shadow a local leader and participate in a service project, which they will design and implement over the course of the 2016-2017 academic year.

    “Every year we meet a new group of students and we wonder, ‘how will they do?’” said Jim Ludes, Pell Center executive director.  “Then, they surprise us.  They dazzle us with innovation, with heart, with compassion, and with an instinctive sense of what it means to show and live Mercy.  Last year, students were so moved by the people running the Advocacy Project in Washington, DC, that they organized an exhibit of quilts back in Newport to tell the stories of marginalized communities all over the world.  This is the kind of impact Mrs. Pell knew our students could have.  We’re humbled to continue her legacy.”

  • World Cybersecurity

    Picks of the Week: What the Panama Paper Breach Means for Your Organization Cybersecurity

    Cybersecurity Lessons Learned From ‘Panama Papers’ Breach | Forbes

    What the Panama Paper Hack Means for Worldwide Cybersecurity | Massive Media

    The Panama Papers Wake Up Call | Security Week

    In the wake of the revelations from the so-called “Panama Papers,” the world of the rich and powerful has been reeling. A single cyber attack against Mossack Fonseca—a Panamanian law firm that was virtually unknown to the public—has sent a tsunami around the world, already toppling one world leader with more turbulence likely to come.

    The attacker absconded with such a vast trove of confidential, attorney-client information—including over 4.8 million emails, 2.2 million PDFs, and 2.6 terabytes of information—that journalists and other investigators have been reviewing it for more than a year. The resulting leak was the largest data security breach in history, and has made previous revelations by WikiLeaks and Edward Snowden look small and limited by comparison.

    The leaked information allegedly details the ways some of the world’s most powerful figures, including presidents, kings, prime ministers, their relatives, and close associates in more than 40 countries from Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Americas, have used offshore companies to hide income and avoid paying taxes. Some of the information dated back almost 40 years to a period before the Internet even existed.

    The identity of the attacker(s), however, remains a mystery. Perhaps it was a company insider with access to the relevant passwords and files? Or maybe a skilled attacker, well-versed in the intricacies of cyber espionage?

    Experts believe that neither profile is accurate, because the Mossack Fonseca cyber attack was actually quite simple. So simple, in fact, that even a script kiddie with limited hacking knowledge could have done it. The leak stemmed from known vulnerabilities in older versions of popular open source web server software Drupal and WordPress that had not been updated and that can easily be exploited. In fact, outdated versions of software that organizations haven’t properly patched is the most common cybersecurity vulnerability today. In addition, Mossack Fonseca’s web server was not behind a firewall and wasn’t separated from their mail servers, and they did not encrypt their emails, which is particularly egregious given the sensitivity of their clients’ information. In other words, Mossack Fonseca failed to take even the most rudimentary steps to protect their confidential client data. And, even if it had put their web server behind a firewall and separated it from their mail servers, hackers would have still been able to exploit their unpatched vulnerabilities to access data on internal systems—it would simply have taken them a bit longer.

    In addition, some of the security mistakes Mossack Fonseca made were violations of common cyber hygiene.

    So, what can your organization learn from this latest hack and do to prevent a similar breach?

    • Patch, patch, patch—ensure that admins have applied all security patches to all software, not just the software that faces the Internet. Your patching regimen should be prompt and thorough – but never count on all software to be properly patched.
    • Train your employees on password protection (and don’t store passwords in a file called passwords!)—require regular changing of passwords (at least quarterly). If you don’t already have a policy in place governing the creation, use, and sharing of passwords for your organization, establish one. Encourage employees to create complex passwords, never to share them, and to implement additional layers of security, such as dual-factor authentication, adding fingerprint locks on computers, single use codes, etc.
    • Train your employees on recognizing phishing emails—fraudulent emails are still a major attack vector. Cyber criminals obtain organization-wide data from just one employee falling for a false email request. Include in your policy what work can be done on personal devices (such as smartphones and tablets), and what work must be done on workplace computers protected by a strong firewall and good virus software.
    • Do not give everybody access to everything—put your eggs in multiple baskets, classify your documents, and segment your networks. Too many organizations have grown their networks with maximum convenience in mind, effectively giving access to everything to everyone. Unfortunately, that means access to outsiders as well if there is even a small chink in your cyber-defenses.
    • Do not store data beyond what you need—if your organization collects some Personally Identifiable Information (PII), such as social security numbers and credit card information, do not store more than you actually need and are willing to protect.
    • Do not use email for sensitive communications—the biggest lesson already learned from the Sony Corporation hack should have been to avoid writing anything that could potentially incriminate or embarrass you or your business. A casual insult, side comment, inappropriate joke or any similar communication, taken in the context of the intended audience, may not offend; however, written data should be considered permanent and available to a broad audience.
    • Do not ignore warning signs and risks—if something seems wrong, don’t ignore it. Take a screenshot, write down the error message, call support, run an antivirus scan. Sometimes it turns out to be nothing, or even a new feature you didn’t know about. Other times it means you are under attack.
    • Do not go another day without an incident response plan—there are only two types of organizations: those that have been breached, and those who don’t know that they have been breached. Any responsible organization should be prepared to respond, mitigate, and remediate a cyber attacks, and this should start by having a clearly-defined and well-exercised incident response plan.

    – Francesca Spidalieri, Senior Fellow

  • Tricia Rose on SIPS 2

    April 17, 2016: “Story in the Public Square”

     

    The third episode of “Story in the Public Square” will be featured on this weekend’s edition of White House Chronicle. Locally, the broadcast will be aired on Sunday, April 17, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS (WSBE).

    hip hop warsThis week, “Story in the Public Square” welcomes guest Tricia Rose, Professor of Africana Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University. She is the author of “Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America” as well as “The Hip Hop Wars,” both of which sparked public narrative when they were released and continue to do so today.

    “White House Chronicle” airs nationwide on some 200 PBS and public, educational and governmental (PEG) access stations; and worldwide on Voice of America Television and Radio. An audio version of the program airs four times weekends on SiriusXM Radio’s popular POTUS (Politics of the United States), Channel 124: Saturdays at 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 1 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ET.

  • Dan Barry on SIPS

    March 27, 2016: “Story in the Public Square”

     

    New York Times staff writer and best-selling author Dan Barry, who shared a Pulitzer Prize early in his career at The Providence Journal and has twice been a Pulitzer finalist while at The Times, will be the guest Sunday on “Story in the Public Square,” a monthly feature of the national PBS show “White House Chronicle“. This is the second episode of “Story in the Public Square,” which launched on March 6, 2016. Locally, the broadcast will be aired on Sunday, March 27, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS (WSBE).

    Boys in the Bunkhouse hardcover coverBarry will be talking about his work and soon-to-be-released next book, “The Boys in the Bunkhouse: Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland,” which is receiving pre-publication critical acclaim. Set to be released May 17, 2016 by HarperCollins, Barry’s latest book tells the story of dozens of men with intellectual disabilities who spent decades working at an Iowa turkey-processing plant, living in an old schoolhouse, and enduring exploitation and abuse – before finding justice and achieving freedom.

    “White House Chronicle” airs nationwide on some 200 PBS and public, educational and governmental (PEG) access stations; and worldwide on Voice of America Television and Radio. An audio version of the program airs four times weekends on SiriusXM Radio’s popular POTUS (Politics of the United States), Channel 124: Saturdays at 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 1 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ET.

    In Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts, the program airs Sundays at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS, Digital 36.1, and other carriers; and 7 p.m. on PBS Learn, Digital 36.2, and other carriers.

    For more information on White House Chronicle and to find your station, visit whchronicle.com.

  • Pulitzer Prize winning image taken by Javier Manzano of Syrian rebel soldiers guarding their position as light streams through bullet holes in a wall.

    Javier Manzano to receive 2016 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

     

    NEWPORT, R.I. – Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and documentary filmmaker Javier Manzano, whose career has taken him to Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya and Nigeria, among many other places, has been named the 2016 winner of the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square. The prize honors a storyteller whose work has significantly influenced the public dialogue.

    Javier ManzanoAs the fourth winner of the prize, conferred by the Story in the Public Square program at Salve Regina University’s Pell Center, Manzano joins journalist and two-time Pulitzer winner Dana Priest, who received the inaugural award in 2013; Emmy-winning screenwriter and actor Danny Strong, the 2014 winner; and last year’s honoree, Lisa Genova, the best-selling author of Still Alice and three other novels.

    “I am deeply honored to be receiving the 2016 Pell Center Prize for my work as a journalist,” Manzano said. “Be it a local or international investigative story, a feature or in my case documentary films and photography, we all strive to bring to the public human stories that spark or further important conversations or remind us that certain truths need not be forgotten.

    “We often believe that events such as conflict or man-made human disasters happen to ‘others in faraway places’ and do not have an impact on our far-removed lives across the world. They do. Policy can be changed. Man-made disasters can be averted. Individuals living in democratic countries have a say in the foreign policy of their own nations. I am thrilled that Story in the Public Square recognizes this type of storytelling.”

    “Javier’s astonishing images tell some of the most important stories of our time in a way that no other media can,” said G. Wayne Miller, Story in the Public Square director, Pell Center visiting fellow and Providence Journal staff writer. “His courage in capturing them is extraordinary. We are thrilled to be bringing Javier to Rhode Island to accept the Pell Center Prize.”

    “It is impossible not be deeply moved by the human dramas captured by Javier’s work,” said Pell Center executive director Jim Ludes. “He alternately enlightens, amazes, disturbs – and always prompts deeper thought and discussion about resolving some of the planet’s most pressing problems.”

    Manzano’s work can be viewed on his web site: www.javiermanzano.com.

    A native of Mexico, Manzano, 40, holds a bachelor’s degree in International Business from Loras College in Iowa and a bachelor’s in photojournalism and documentary film production from California’s Brooks Institute of Photography. After internships at several American newspapers, Manzano was hired by the Rocky Mountain News in Denver. When it folded, in 2009, Manzano began his independent career. He is currently based in the Middle East.

    Manzano won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography for his photo, distributed through Agence France-Presse, of Syrian rebel soldiers guarding their position as light streams through bullet holes in a wall. Among his 12 other awards are two World Press Photo Awards, in 2010 and 2013, and the 2013 Bayeux-Calvados Award for war correspondents.

    Manzano will speak, present some of his work, and receive the Pell Center Prize in a ceremony at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 21, at the Pell Center on the campus of Salve Regina University in Newport, R.I. Details about the event will be released in the coming weeks.

    While in Rhode Island, Manzano will be interviewed for an episode of “Story in the Public Square,” a new monthly feature of the national PBS show “White House Chronicle.” The show is taped at the Providence studios of Rhode Island PBS.

    Founded in 2012, Story in the Public Square is an initiative to celebrate, study and tell stories that matter. A partnership of the Pell Center and The Providence Journal, the program sponsors public seminars and discussions, annually names a local and national story of the year, and is guided by a culturally and creatively diverse Story Board.

    Image courtesy of Agence France-Presse.

  • SIPS taping August Cole Image

    March 6, 2016: “Story in the Public Square”

     

    “Story in the Public Square” will debut on this week’s edition of White House Chronicle. Locally, the broadcast will be aired on Sunday, March 6, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS (WSBE).

    The Pell Center’s Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller welcome August Cole as the first guest of this special edition of White House Chronicle. Cole is the co-author of Ghost Fleet, a novel of the next world war, a former journalist with the Wall Street Journal, and most recently a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, working to mine narrative fiction for insights about the future of war. He is also Writer-in-Residence at Avascent, an independent strategy and management-consulting firm focused on the defense and aerospace sectors.

    “White House Chronicle” airs nationwide on some 200 PBS and public, educational and governmental (PEG) access stations; and worldwide on Voice of America Television and Radio. An audio version of the program airs four times weekends on SiriusXM Radio’s popular POTUS (Politics of the United States), Channel 124: Saturdays at 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 1 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ET.

    In Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts, the program airs Sundays at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS, Digital 36.1, and other carriers; and 7 p.m. on PBS Learn, Digital 36.2, and other carriers.

    For more information on White House Chronicle and to find your station, visit whchronicle.com.

     

     

  • Jonathan Morganstein Electricity Box

    Podcast: Jonathan Morgenstein

    Adjunct Fellow Jonathan Morgenstein spoke to Executive Director Jim Ludes via Skype to discuss his work bringing solar power to the Middle East. The goal of Empowerment Solar is to foster energy independence and economic prosperity for individuals and business owners. For more information, visit www.empowermentsolar.com.

     

     

    Jonathan Morganstein Solar Panels

  • SIPS Press Release Image 2

    “Story in the Public Square” debuts March 6, 2016 on White House Chronicle

     

    NEWPORT, R.I.—The Pell Center at Salve Regina University will partner with “White House Chronicle,” a national PBS show with global reach, to produce episodes of “Story in the Public Square.”

    Hosted by Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller, visiting fellow and director of the Story in the Public Square initiative, the new episodes will feature interviews with today’s best print, screen, music and other storytellers about their creative process and how their stories impact public understanding and policy.

    “Last year, after shooting two pilots of a stand-alone series with best-selling author Lisa Genova and Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times writer Dan Barry, we decided a partnership with a high-profile existing show would be the best road to travel,” said  Miller, a staff writer at The Providence Journal. “Subsequent conversations with Llewellyn King and Linda Gasparello, co-hosts of ‘White House Chronicle,’ led to this great opportunity.”

    “White House Chronicle” will present a special-edition episode each month featuring Story in the Public Square.

    “We created Story in the Public Square four years ago to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter,” said Ludes. “We are thrilled to be working with Llewellyn and Linda, two tremendous storytellers in their own right, to reach a national – and international – audience.”

    “Through our partnership with Jim Ludes of The Pell Center and G. Wayne Miller, a distinguished author, filmmaker and journalist, we open the door to two exciting minds. Embedding Story in the Public Square into ‘White House Chronicle’ will add a new dimension to the program, which Linda and I have been producing and presenting for 20 years,” said Llewellyn King, who is also the creator and executive producer of the program.

    “Episodes of Story in the Public Square on the program will show how ‘stories’ can shape our history, mold our culture, shine a light into dark corners, and provide comfort and healing. Telling stories is the very stuff of civilization,” King added.

    “White House Chronicle” airs nationwide on some 200 PBS and public, educational and governmental (PEG) access stations; and worldwide on Voice of America Television and Radio. An audio version of the program airs four times weekends on SiriusXM Radio’s popular POTUS (Politics of the United States), Channel 124: Saturdays at 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 1 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ET.

    In Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts, the program airs Sundays at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS, Digital 36.1, and other carriers; and 7 p.m. on PBS Learn, Digital 36.2, and other carriers.

    The first episode of “Story in the Public Square,” featuring guest August Cole, will air on Sunday, March 6, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. on PBS (WSBE) in Rhode Island. Cole is the co-author of Ghost Fleet: A Novel of the Next World War, and a nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council where he directs the Art of Future War project, mining narrative fiction and visual media for insight into the future of conflict.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership of the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. More at pellcenter.org/story-in-the-public-square.

     

Page 5 of 6« First...23456