• Pell Center Senior Fellow Francesca Spidalieri looks away from the camera at a cybersecurity conference in Rome, Italy.

    Senior Fellow Engages with International Cybersecurity Community

    Newport, R.I. — Pell Center Senior Fellow Francesca Spidalieri spent the month of June traveling throughout Europe and the Middle East to speak at three different international conferences on cybersecurity and to engage with world-renowned experts and policy-makers shaping the future of Internet governance and security.  Spidalieri shares her account of the trip:

    Capitalizing on the research carried out in the past year on cyber leadership development and countries’ cyber preparedness and resilience, I eagerly participated in multiple international engagements on cybersecurity-related topics and shared insights and lessons learned from the field.

    IMG_0604I first visited Oxford, UK for a two-day workshop with representatives of major international organizations, including the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA), the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organizations (CTO), the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies (PIPS), and others. These organizations are working in tandem to develop a National Cybersecurity Strategy (NCS) Reference Guide meant to help countries around the world elaborate, implement, or further enhance their respective national cybersecurity strategies. This document will be a key resource for countries to gain a clear understanding of what the purpose and content of a national cybersecurity strategy should be, and will outline relevant models—such as the Cyber Readiness Index 2.0 (CRI) I have been working on—available to governments to enhance cybersecurity and protect critical information infrastructures essential to their national security and economic well-being.

    After the United Kingdom, I traveled to Rome, Italy to participate in the first-ever Conference on “Cyber Strategy and National Security,” co-sponsored by Moire Consulting and the Pell Center. The invitation-only event was attended by government representatives, diplomats, selected journalists, subject-matter experts, and a delegation of midshipmen and instructors from the US Naval Academy. This was one of the first times in which the Italian government publicly discussed some of its most ambitious efforts—including the creation of an Italian Cyber Command—to defend Italy’s critical infrastructures and sensitive information from cyber threats emanating from state and non-state actors. On this occasion, I had the privilege of representing both my native country—Italy—and my adopted country—the United States—and to help building bridges between the two.  In addition, I had the opportunity to discuss one of my most recent Pell Center studies on the role that US service academies play in developing a pipeline of qualified cyber strategic military leaders, and share findings and lessons learned with Italian representatives.

    IMG_1117I then headed to Tel Aviv, Israel to take part in the 6th Annual International Cybersecurity Conference, also known as Cyber Week, organized by the Tel Aviv University’s Blavatnik Interdisciplinary Cyber Research Center, the Israeli National Cyber Bureau, and Israel’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The annual event brings together cybersecurity professionals from Israel and around the world to meet with policymakers, entrepreneurs, investors, and academics to discuss cyber threats facing the international community and the latest advances in cyber technology. This year, the program focused on the impact of cyber threats on commerce, technology, economy, academia, defense, and diplomacy, and included lectures, a start-up competition, workshops, and roundtables.  On the first day of the conference, I delivered a presentation on the “Global Cyber Readiness Index,” a methodology specifically designed to evaluate countries’ maturity and commitment to securing their national cyber infrastructures and services upon which their digital future and growth depend. The panel discussion that followed provided an opportunity for policymakers, subject-matter experts, and diplomats in the audience to weigh in and engage in a lively discussion on the economic erosion caused by cyber insecurity.

    In short—what an incredible journey through half of the world! Even though all of these engagements show how far the international community has gone in combating cybercrime and other malicious cyber activities and in establishing international norms of conduct in cyberspace, they also continued to confirm that much still remains to be done in the years ahead.

    I look forward to continuing to participate in these important discussions and use my research at the Pell Center to raise awareness about systemic problems and actionable solutions in this field. – Francesca Spidalieri, Senior Fellow for Cyber Leadership

     

     

     

  • Pell Center Prize winner Javier Manzano speaks from the podium during an event for the acceptance of his award.

    Witness: Photographer and Filmmaker Javier Manzano Receives 2016 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

    Newport, R.I. – One day in Aleppo, Syria, in 2012, Javier Manzano was in a car driving along a road.  He found himself in one of the world’s most dangerous places because he is a photojournalist and there was a story to tell.

    As they drove, he saw the road in front of him erupt as a Syrian Air Force bomb detonated.  His car screeched to a halt and as the driver tried to reverse course, a second explosion detonated 40-50 meters to his rear- igniting the car behind him and killing everyone inside it.

    Fearing that the planes would soon return to strafe the road with cannonGirl with Bread fire, Manzano and his fellow travelers scampered to safety, ducking into a former welding shop where women and children huddled, clutching loaves of bread they had just stood in line to receive.  The picture he snapped in that moment tells a story—a young Syrian girl, the look of anguished worry clear in her eyes, the bread she had been waiting for held close.

    This is the face of the Syrian civil war and we know it in the west because people like Javier Manzano are willing to risk their lives to tell the stories of those who can’t.

    * * *

    On June 21, Manzano was honored with the 2016 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square. The prize honors a storyteller whose work has significantly influenced the public dialogue. Previous winners are Pulitzer Prize winning-journalist Dana Priest (2013), Emmy-winning screenwriter Danny Strong (2014), and best-selling author Lisa Genova (2015).

    Sitting in Newport, RI, the afternoon before receiving the Pell Center prize, Manzano described candidly the emotions his work provokes in himself.  “I’m pretty angry,” he says.  “You see these things, you report on these things, you show the world, but somewhere over the Atlantic the story gets lost and policies don’t change.”

    Javier Manzano’s personal story began in Mexico where he was born to an American mother and Mexican father.  After college and graduate school, he began work as a photographer for the Rocky Mountain News before that paper ceased publication.  When it folded, Manzano drove to the Mexican border and began working as a freelance photographer documenting the drug and gang violence along the Rio Grande border between the United States and Mexico.  Sleeping in his own car, showering at a local Y, and developing local relationships, Manzano honed his craft and documented the bloody violence of a local police force engaged in conflict with a ruthless drug gang.

    Since then, Manzano has worked in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya and Nigeria, among other countries, where he has captured the carnage of war and the best and worst of humanity.

    A picture taken on October 18, 2012 shows two Syrian rebels taking sniper positions at the heavily contested neighborhood of Karmal Jabl in central Aleppo. After two years largely on the sidelines, the international community is finally showing signs of taking action on Syria's escalating conflict but analysts say it may be a case of too little too late.   AFP PHOTO/JAVIER MANZANO

    Manzano won the Pulitzer Prize in 2013 for this image, taken in 2012 and distributed by Agence-France Presse, of Syrian rebels in their fighting position.

    During his time in Syria, Manzano captured a haunting image of two Syrian rebels in their fighting position in an abandoned building.  Shrapnel holes in the metal screen on the front of the building yielded fingers of light piercing the darkness.  Manzano captured the image on his camera and sold it as a freelancer to Agence France Presse for $150.  Months later, the image he captured earned Manzano rightful recognition with the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography.  Manzano was the first freelance photographer to be recognized with the award in 17 years.

    * * *

    At the reception that follows the presentation of the Pell Center Prize, Manzano is given the rock-star treatment.  Audience members clamber for the opportunity to ask him a question.  He responds patiently to every question—though most ask the same question over and over.  “Is it dangerous?”  “Are you a target?”  “Why do you accept so much risk?”

    In his remarks, Manzano had stressed the difficulties that freelance journalists face when they travel to cover conflict stories. “It’s a commitment that you have because there’s no other way to keep going.” There are days, he admits, when he doesn’t want to go back out, doesn’t want to don the Kevlar body armor that is as vital to his work as are his cameras.  “It’s what journalism is about, it’s about telling stories,” he says, “that is your job… Sometimes it is not pleasant. Sometimes you don’t want to go out there, you don’t want to go to visit a front line.”

    He cautions against freelance journalists simply buying a plane ticket and following a story; instead, Manzano advises his younger colleagues to properly prepare themselves with medical supplies, body protection, and training.  A number of charities now support preparing journalists and photographers for service in combat zones—something that could have saved lives earlier in the War on Terror.

    While freelance journalists face a myriad of challenges, it can be an advantage to have the flexibility to stay in a certain place for longer periods of time than staff journalists. Manzano prefers to make residence in close proximity to where his stories are based. Projects have taken him to Afghanistan, Syria, Mexico, and Turkey for years at a time.

    “It gives you a greater understanding of what the situation really is, so you can translate that to your audience… in imperfect terms, because I am not Syrian, I am not Iraqi, I am a white man with some khaki pants and multiple pockets, telling you what the story is,” said Manzano.

    * * *

    In presenting the fourth Pell Center Prize to Manzano, Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes heralded the photographer’s role in shining a light in the dark corners.

    “This evening, we put our own humble stamp of endorsement on Javier Manzano,” Ludes said.  “In the most dangerous locations, often amidst death and destruction, he bears witness for all of us.  In the unblinking eye of his camera, he has captured courage and fear, desperation and hope, valor, death, horror, and even love.  He is an accomplished storyteller, in the truest sense of the word, who deepens our humanity by sharing stories that we might wish we didn’t have to know.  But, stories that, as citizens of this planet, we must know.  And because of Javier Manzano and his work, we do.”

    Manzano acknowledged the gravity of his work.

    “There is a message that someone still wants to tell you from inside Syria. Do not forget about us,” he told the audience.  “[T]he vast majority of the casualties of war are civilians that couldn’t get out in time or they’re just stuck, they have no choice, and you question ‘Why am I doing this if I don’t see any change across the pond, across the Atlantic?’”  He continued, “It makes our job very hard to justify until someone you’re photographing pulls you back and tells you ‘Photograph my son, and photograph my pain, photograph me.”

    Senator Claiborne Pell believed it was important that we speak for those who cannot, or dare not, speak.  The same spirit animates the work of Javier Manzano. He finished, “I wish we could give [their loved ones] back to them, but the most we can offer is that their voice is going to be heard somewhere.”

    A partnership between the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and The Providence Journal, Story in the Public Square is an initiative to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • The Pell Center's Executive Director Jim Ludes and the Providence Journal's G. Wayne Miller sit down with photojournalist Javier Manzano on the set of Story in the Public Square.

    July 10, 2016: “White House Chronicle: Story in the Public Square”

    Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and documentary filmmaker Javier Manzano, who recently received the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square, will be featured this week on “White House Chronicle: Story in the Public Square.”

    Manzano captures the stories of people all over the world, from American workers who built nuclear weapons for the Cold War to fighters in the Syrian civil war. He won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography for his photo, distributed through Agence France-Presse, of Syrian rebel soldiers guarding their position as light streams through bullet holes in a wall.

    Javier Manzano on set at "White House Chronicle" at RI PBS. “Javier Manzano is a storyteller with real insight into some of the world’s most pressing problems.  Our conversation with him reflects what he witnessed for all of us in Syria and other war zones.  It’s a compelling episode.” said G. Wayne Miller, director of Story in the Public Square.

    “White House Chronicle” airs nationwide on some 200 PBS and public, educational and governmental (PEG) access stations; and worldwide on Voice of America Television and Radio. An audio version of the program airs four times weekends on SiriusXM Radio’s popular POTUS (Politics of the United States), Channel 124: Saturdays at 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 1 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ET.

    In Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts, the program airs Sundays at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS, Digital 36.1, and other carriers; and 7 p.m. Sunday on PBS Learn, Digital 36.2, and other carriers.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership of The Pell Center at Salve Regina University and the Providence Journal. Ludes is executive director of The Pell Center and Journal Staff Writer Miller directs the Story in the Public Square program.

    Locally, the broadcast will be aired on Sunday, July 10, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS (WSBE).

    Read more about the 2016 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square.

    See Javier’s work here.

  • Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes speaks with Scott Bates during a podcast.

    Podcast: Scott Bates

     

    The Pell Center’s newest adjunct fellow, Scott Bates, joins Jim Ludes for a wide-ranging conversation about politics, international relations, and so much more.

     

     

  • Profile image of Scott Bates in front of an American flag.

    Pell Center Expands International Focus with Addition of Foreign Policy Expert Scott Bates

    Newport, R.I. – The Pell Center at Salve Regina University announced the addition of Scott Bates, an experienced student and practitioner of U.S. foreign policy, as an adjunct fellow. Bates, of Stonington, Connecticut, brings to the Pell Center a diverse background in international relations, politics, and on-the-ground experience in America’s war zones.  He also serves as Executive Director of the Connecticut Institute for the 21st Century (CT21).

    “Scott Bates is a leader whose courage and intellect have made him singularly effective,” said Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes. “There once was a time,” Ludes continued, “when a commitment to democratic values abroad meant a commitment to progress at home.  Scott Bates—in his professional undertakings and his personal commitments—is the embodiment of that ideal. We’re thrilled to have him join the Pell Center.”

    Bates’ career has seen him serve in a wide variety of local, state, federal, and international positions. In American government, Bates served as Secretary of State and Legislative Director for the Governor of Virginia where he was responsible for development and passage of the governor’s legislative agenda.  After 9/11, Scott served as the first Senior Policy Advisor to the U.S. House of Representatives Homeland Security Committee. He has worked with leaders and activists to support governing institutions and democratic development in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo, Bosnia, Haiti, and throughout the Middle East. Bates has been a featured speaker on defense issues and international affairs. His areas of expertise include homeland security, counterterrorism, and U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, Asia, and Eastern Europe.

    Bates has been a senior lecturer at University of Tokyo, as well as a visiting professor at the University of Indiana School of Law, Connecticut College, and the University of Pristina in Kosovo. Among his career highlights, Bates served as President of the Center for National Policy and as Senior Advisor for the Truman National Security Project.

    The Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy is a think-tank on the campus of Salve Regina University focused at the intersection of politics, policies, and ideas.

    To listen to Scott Bates’ podcast, click here.

  • Title page Transforming the Next Generation of Military Leaders into the cyber-Strategic Leaders: The Role of Cybersecurity Education in US Service Academies by Francesca Spidalieri and Jennifer McArdle

    Preparing Military Cyber-Strategic Leaders

    Newport, R.I. – The Army Cyber Institute at West Point recently published their inaugural print edition of The Cyber Defense Review (CDR) with contributions from Pell Center Senior Fellow for Cyber Leadership, Francesca Spidalieri. Spidalieri co-authored a chapter of the magazine entitled, “Transforming the Next Generation of Military leaders into Cyber-Strategic Leaders: The Role of Cybersecurity Education in US Service Academies.”

    Her study addresses the role that US service academies play in developing not only specialized cyber forces, but especially a pipeline of qualified cyber strategic military leaders. As Spidalieri noted: “Today, no modern military can enter the battlespace without some reliance on cyberspace. In the future, every military leader will have to also be a cyber strategic leader.”

    The article surveys current efforts by the US Coast Guard Academy, the US Air Force Academy, the US Military Academy, and the US Naval Academy to prepare all future officers for the challenges of operational- and strategic-level cyber threats. The survey Spidalieri carried out over the course of several months provides an overview of the level of exposure cadets and midshipman receive to cyber issues and to what extent they graduate with an adequate understanding of the cyber challenges facing their respective services. In addition, the article identifies some of the gaps in current curricula and offers preliminary recommendations to include a stronger cybersecurity component into existing programs at US service academies.

    The full article, “Transforming the Next Generation of Military Leaders into Cyber-Strategic Leaders: The role of cybersecurity education in the US service academies,” can be downloaded here.

    The Cyber Defense Review magazine can be downloaded here.

  • May 15, 2016: “Story in the Public Square”

    NEWPORT, R.I. – Brian Goldner, chairman, president and CEO of giant toy- and game-maker Hasbro, Inc., will be the guest this weekend on “White House Chronicle: Story in the Public Square.”

    Goldner runs the $4.45-billion company that markets and sells Monopoly, Nerf, Transformers, Star Wars, Disney, Marvel and other house brands and licensed products. But more than that, Hasbro projects influence inside millions of homes across the planet – and it is this unusual role, among other issues, that “Story in the Public Square” hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller explore with Goldner in this weekend’s episode.

    “Hasbro is the oldest major toy and game company in the world and the second-largest in terms of revenue, but more than that, its products – unlike, say, soft drinks or shoes – can play a significant role in the psycho-social development of children,” said Miller. “And that is one of the major issues we asked Goldner to discuss: how he and his Rhode Island-based firm manage what can only be called a sacred public trust. His response proved enlightening.”IMG_3780 cropped

    Goldner also talks about the use of narrative storytelling in the toy, TV and film industries; the challenges of running a global toy company; and the research with parents, children, internal staff and outside experts that goes into development of hundreds of products for all age groups, from baby to grown-up.

    Previous guests on “White House Chronicle: Story in the Public Square” include New York Times staff writer and best-selling author Dan Barry, whose latest book, “The Boys in the Bunkhouse,” will be published on May 17; Tricia Rose, Professor of Africana Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University and author of “Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America” and “The Hip Hop Wars”; and August Cole, co-author of “Ghost Fleet,” a former journalist with the Wall Street Journal, and most recently a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council.

    “White House Chronicle” airs nationwide on some 200 PBS and public, educational and governmental (PEG) access stations; and worldwide on Voice of America Television and Radio. An audio version of the program airs four times weekends on SiriusXM Radio’s popular POTUS (Politics of the United States), Channel 124: Saturdays at 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 1 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ET.

    In Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts, the program airs Sundays at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS, Digital 36.1, and other carriers; and 7 p.m. Sunday on PBS Learn, Digital 36.2, and other carriers.
    Story in the Public Square is a partnership of The Pell Center at Salve Regina University and the Providence Journal. Ludes is executive director of The Pell Center and Journal Staff Writer Miller directs the Story in the Public Square program.

    Locally, the broadcast will be aired on Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS (WSBE).

     

  • Head shot of Dr. Martha McCann Rose wearing a pink jacket and smiling at the camera.

    Podcast: Martha Rose

    Dr. Martha Rose, Salve Regina professor and faculty fellow at the Pell Center, joins Dr. Jim Ludes to discuss issues in education, from high-stakes testing to services for students with Autism.

     

     

     

  • Photograph of the 2016-2017 Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows at the Pell Center.

    Nuala Pell Leadership Program Selects Fellows for 2016-2017

    Newport, R.I. – Fourteen rising sophomores at Salve Regina University have been selected for an innovative leadership development program run by the Pell Center. Named in honor of the wife of U.S. Senator Claiborne Pell, the Nuala Pell Leadership Program builds student leaders for the twenty-first century.

    “In the first two years of the program, our student fellows have impressed us with their commitment, their desire to grow as leaders, and their potential to change the world,” said Chelsea Buffington, program director. “We expect great things from this year’s group, too.”

    The 2016-2017 cohort of Nuala Pell Leadership Program fellows include:

    • Toyosi Akanji, Chemistry, Cranston, RI
    • Cassidy Chapman, Global Business, Douglas, MA
    • Alexandra Correia, Administration of Justice, Fall River, MA
    • Jacquelyn Cutts, Religious & Theological Studies and Philosophy, Anaheim, CA
    • Daniel Donnelly, Chemistry, Portsmouth, RI
    • Michaela Lacerra, Nursing, Marlborough, MA
    • Evie O’Callaghan, Business Administration, Lancaster, United Kingdom
    • Sydnee Odei-Ntiri, Cultural & Historic Preservation and History, New Haven, CT
    • Tristen Perez, Administration of Justice, Framingham, MA
    • Grayce Rogers, History, Osterville, MA
    • Brian Schmidt, Nursing, Mansfield, MA
    • Andrew Siaba, Financial Management, Natick, MA
    • Kate Vitagliano, Psychology, Guilford, CT
    • Kendall Wilcox, Administration of Justice, Pomfret, CT

    The Nuala Pell Leadership Program includes monthly meetings where students engage in topics ranging from leadership theory and leadership ethics to managing change and vision mapping. Students meet with invited leaders to learn specific attributes of successful leaders. In 2016, Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows will travel to the nation’s capital where they will participate in group meetings with a wide variety of leaders and engage in team-building exercises. Each student will also shadow a local leader and participate in a service project, which they will design and implement over the course of the 2016-2017 academic year.

    “Every year we meet a new group of students and we wonder, ‘how will they do?’” said Jim Ludes, Pell Center executive director.  “Then, they surprise us.  They dazzle us with innovation, with heart, with compassion, and with an instinctive sense of what it means to show and live Mercy.  Last year, students were so moved by the people running the Advocacy Project in Washington, DC, that they organized an exhibit of quilts back in Newport to tell the stories of marginalized communities all over the world.  This is the kind of impact Mrs. Pell knew our students could have.  We’re humbled to continue her legacy.”

  • April 17, 2016: “Story in the Public Square”

     

    The third episode of “Story in the Public Square” will be featured on this weekend’s edition of White House Chronicle. Locally, the broadcast will be aired on Sunday, April 17, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. on Rhode Island PBS (WSBE).

    hip hop warsThis week, “Story in the Public Square” welcomes guest Tricia Rose, Professor of Africana Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University. She is the author of “Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America” as well as “The Hip Hop Wars,” both of which sparked public narrative when they were released and continue to do so today.

    “White House Chronicle” airs nationwide on some 200 PBS and public, educational and governmental (PEG) access stations; and worldwide on Voice of America Television and Radio. An audio version of the program airs four times weekends on SiriusXM Radio’s popular POTUS (Politics of the United States), Channel 124: Saturdays at 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 1 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ET.

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