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  • Tracing the Origins of the “Fiscal Cliff”

    Shortly after the re-election of President Barack Obama, there was an immediate and pressing concern to address the termination of tax cuts by January 1, 2013. The expiration of several tax cuts worth billions of dollars—the Bush tax cuts, the payroll-tax holiday, the alternative minimum tax, and tax credits—would result in raised expenses across the board, from the middle class to the affluent “one-percent.” The phrase used to define this … Read More

  • Ancient Behaviors in Modern Day: Honor Killings Still Dominate Patriarchal Societies

    Fifteen year old, Anusha became one of 943 reported honor killings that happen in Pakistan each year. Her family killed her by pouring acid all over her body which had already been wounded from a beating. The reason for such treatment was because she sullied her family’s name by looking at a boy passing by on a motorcycle. Honor killings are frequent occurrences in Pakistan, as well as the Middle … Read More

  • “Poverty and Development” Visualizes a Fairer Economy by Transitioning the Informal Sector

    On Thursday, November 8, 2012, the Pell Center hosted a lecture given by Karen Tramontano, the founder and President of the Global Fairness Initiative (GFI) at DiStefano Lecture Hall. The lecture, Poverty & Development: The Role of the Informal Economy in Changing People’s Lives discussed how developing countries’ economies benefit from integrating the “informal sector” of businesses with the formal sector. The informal sector, as defined by GFI, refers to … Read More

  • Presidential Election 2012: Obama Re-elected (Op-Ed)

    Last night and early this morning, it was clear America had spoken. President Barack Obama was re-elected for a second term in office, despite the delayed rescindence of Governor Mitt Romney and the very disappointed Karl Rove as seen on Fox News. The president won the Northeast, the West Coast, and most of the swing states–Ohio, Florida, Virginia, Colorado, Nevada, Iowa, New Mexico, and New Hampshire. President Obama was earned votes … Read More

  • Visualizing the Electoral College

    The American election day routine, go to work, get in line to vote, cast your ballot, and then spend the night waiting for the winner to be announced. Most Americans however, do not know what happens when they vote. These two brief videos explain where your vote goes, the American Electoral College, and the problems that it causes.

  • The Last Stand: A Final Look at the Polls Before Election Day 2012 (Op-Ed)

    A summary of this morning’s polls on The New York Times, The Washington Post and Real Clear Politics: an edge for President Barack Obama in the Electoral College, a veritable deadlock between Governor Mitt Romney (47.4%) and President Obama (47.8%) in the popular vote, and an uncertain turnout for the swing states. In one final attempt to sway voters hours before Election Day, both candidates are currently wrapping up their … Read More

  • EPA Grant Encourages Students to Develop Green Technology

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently accepting applications for Phase I of the “P3” Grant Competition, which provides funding to teams of college students who design sustainable technologies. The People, Prosperity and the Planet (“P3”) Grant has two phases: Phase I awards $15,000 to winning teams to develop their idea. Then, in order to reach Phase II, they must complete their design and share it at The … Read More

  • Author James Carroll on Rhode Island’s and America’s Moral Charter

    On Thursday October 18, 2012, Boston Globe columnist and author James Carroll spoke at the kick-off a multi-day planning session organized by the Pell Center, the Newport Historical Society, the John Carter Brown Library, the George Washington Institute for Religious Freedom, Brown University, and Bryant University. Carroll, author of Jerusalem, Jerusalem offered a blend of historical context and contemporary political reflection, weaving the legacy of Roger Williams and Rhode Island’s … Read More

  • The FEMA Debate: Hurricane Sandy Raises Questions about FEMA’s Role

    Since Hurricane Sandy’s departure from the East Coast of the United States, 6.6 million people in 15 states and the District of Columbia are still without electricity—1.9 million New Yorkers alone are without power. All of the sights and sounds of The Big Apple—the subways, the trains, the city’s skyline—are either submerged underwater or shut off. In light of the hurricane’s aftermath, there have been discussions about how the federal … Read More

  • Malala Yousafzai Opens Our Eyes to What Really Matters

    Everyday, brave men and woman are tirelessly promoting democracy and basic human rights. In a country such as Pakistan, this heroic task comes with great risk. On Tuesday (10/9/12) Malala Yousafzai, a 14-year-old girl from Swat Pakistan, was attacked by the Taliban for her support of girls’ education. This inconceivable act of extremism served as a wake up for conservative clerics, secular politicians, military leaders, media figures, and the general … Read More

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