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“Story in the Public Square”

December 2, 2017: Tara Copp

Whether it’s a film like “Saving Private Ryan,” or a memoir like “A Helmet for My Pillow,” the temptation to romanticize war—and the Second World War, in particular—is part of American life. Tara Copp made sense of her own experience in the Iraq war, by understanding her grandfather’s service more than 70 years ago.

Each week, the Pell Center produces episodes of “Story in the Public Square,” a public affairs television series. The show features interviews with today’s best print, screen, music and other storytellers about their creative processes and how their stories impact public understanding and policy.

Hosted by Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller, “Story in the Public Square”  aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal.

“Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

Recent Episodes

November 25, 2017: Rear Admiral Jeffrey Harley

Among its many missions, the U.S. military also operates a system of schools that provide professional military education—or PME—to rising leaders in each service. Therefore, Rear Admiral Jeffrey A. Harley has charted a new path for the U.S. Naval War College at a time of historic global challenges.

November 18, 2017: Christopher Brown

Speculative fiction, from the most fantastic science fiction to the bleakest dystopias, shines a light on current issues and the reality we know in the here and now. Writer and lawyer, Christopher Brown uses narrative as a laboratory about governance, political violence, and even what it means to be American. His debut novel, Tropic of Kansas, depicts a fractured United States in the aftermath of another Civil War.