Navigation

“Story in the Public Square”

May 19, 2018: Heather Ann Thompson

What’s the difference between a riot and an uprising? Your answer might have something to do with your perspective on the violence. Heather Ann Thompson looks at events at Attica State Prison in 1971 and draws a direct connection to the challenges America faces in its criminal justice system today.

Each week, the Pell Center produces episodes of “Story in the Public Square,” a public affairs television series and podcast. The show features interviews with today’s best print, screen, music and other storytellers about their creative processes and how their stories impact public understanding and policy.

Hosted by Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller, “Story in the Public Square”  aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter. You can listen to the official podcast and download episodes for free on our Story in the Public Square show page as well as on iTunes, Spotify and Google Play. Subscribe on your favorite platform to get updates on all the latest episodes!

Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal.

“Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 8:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

Recent Episodes

May 5, 2018: Dan Barry

Every year, the Pell Center at Salve Regina University honors one individual who makes the world better with their storytelling, who shines a light into the dark places of the human experience, and who helps us all better understand the world around us and our place in it.  In 2018, we are honoring Dan Barry of the New York Times, and we talk to him this week, on Story in the Public Square.

April 26, 2018: Kennith Miller

One of the most important stories in human history is the creation story of the Hebrew bible. Its impact can still be felt today in debates over the proper role of creation and evolution in American classrooms. Kenneth Miller is a respected scientist whose published work seeks common ground between God and science.