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“Story in the Public Square”

March 31, 2018: Bernard LaFayette

Imagine the courage of a young black man in the Jim Crow South to sit at a “Whites Only” lunch counter; to need a military escort for a bus ride; to be assaulted by the Ku Klux Klan, and, through it all, remain committed to non-violence. Dr. Bernard LaFayette has done just that, he joins us this week on Story in the Public Square.

Each week, the Pell Center produces episodes of “Story in the Public Square,” a public affairs television series and podcast. The show features interviews with today’s best print, screen, music and other storytellers about their creative processes and how their stories impact public understanding and policy.

Hosted by Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller, “Story in the Public Square”  aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter. You can listen to the official podcast and download episodes for free on our Story in the Public Square show page as well as on iTunes, Spotify and Google Play. Subscribe on your favorite platform to get updates on all the latest episodes!

Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal.

“Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 8:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 1:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

Recent Episodes

March 24, 2018: Martin Puchner

This show—Story in the Public Square—is built on one central insight: that stories have the power to change the world.  Martin Puchner is a scholar of the impact stories have had on minds around the world, and on human history itself.

March 17, 2018: Jacquelyn Schneider

The intermingling of traditional and emerging security challenges demands fresh thinking from a new generation of scholars and practitioners—guest Jacquelyn Schneider tells us that some of those new thinkers and new soldiers will not look like their predecessors.