• The Expanding News Desert with Penny Abernathy

    Air Dates: February 17-23, 2020

    It wasn’t so long ago that small and mid-sized American communities were served by multiple news outlets.  Penny Abernathy warns of the expansion of “news deserts,” or areas without dedicated local coverage because of shifting technology and consumer behavior. 

    Penelope (Penny) Abernathy is the Knight Chair in Journalism and Digital Media Economics at the University of North Carolina and former executive at The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. A journalism professional with more than 30 years of experience as a reporter, editor and senior media business executive, she specializes in preserving quality journalism by helping news organizations succeed economically in the digital environment.  Her research focuses on the implications of the digital revolution for news organizations, the information needs of communities and the emergence of news deserts in the United States.  She authored “The Expanding News Deserts,” a major 2018 report that documents the decline and loss of local news organizations in the U.S., and was the lead co-author of “The Strategic Digital Media Entrepreneur” which explores in-depth the emerging business models of successful media enterprises.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Abernathy describes what she calls “ghost newspapers,” or newspapers that have drastically reduced their staff and content as a byproduct of shifts in consumer behavior.  She attributes the loss of reporting on education, the environment, and investigative pieces to this shift.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Telling the Stories of War with Mark Jacobson

    Air Dates: February 10-16, 2020

    War stories—whether the stuff of memoir or fictional portrayals of people at war—are mainstays of literature across human history, and today, that extends to film.  Mark Jacobson is both a historian and a veteran who seizes on the power of modern storytelling in film to educate the next generation about the realities of war.

    Dr. Jacobson is the John J. McCloy ’16 Professor of American Institutions and International Diplomacy at Amherst College and is a non-resident Senior Fellow at Salve Regina University’s Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy. He has over twenty years of experience in the federal government, international organizations, and academia working on some of the most complex and politically sensitive national security issues facing the United States.  Since November 2017, Jacobson has served as a senior policy advisor at Kasowitz Benson Torrres LLC where, as a part of the Government Affairs and Strategic Counsel group, he helps to advise on and resolve complex and politically sensitive issues for clients, as well as representing clients before the U.S. government.  Jacobson was previously appointed as the Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Defense and Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Navy and served in Kabul, Afghanistan as the Deputy NATO Representative and Director of International Affairs at the International Security Assistance Force.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Jacobson describes what he wants his students to take away from his courses that cover the stories of modern warfare.  He says, “I want them to understand what the cost of war is,” saying one of the best ways to decrease the amount of future wars is to understand their true cost.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • What it Means to Be an American with Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen

    Air Dates: February 3-9, 2020

    History, as a subject of study, is more than a linear progression of events—it’s ideas, currents of thought, institutions of learning, social movements, moral awakenings and more.  In a brief, new book, Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen traces the history of ideas that shaped the United States from its beginnings. 

    Ratner-Rosenhagen is the Merle Curti Associate Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison).  She specializes in U.S. intellectual and cultural history and focuses on the history of philosophy, political and social theory, religion, literature and print culture, the visual arts, and the transatlantic flow of intellectual and cultural movements.  She is the author of American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas and has received numerous awards for her writing, including the Morris D. Forkosch Prize for the best first book in intellectual history.  Along with her academic scholarship and teaching, Ratner-Rosenhagen is the founder of the Intellectual History Group at UW-Madison, an informal, interdisciplinary working group for faculty and graduate students interested in the varieties of intellectual history and history of ideas.

    On this episode, Ratner-Rosenhagen says one of the central questions of American intellectual history is, “what does it mean to be an American?”  This question prompts us to look at the past through the ideas and people who made them or who were moved by them.  We can then ask, what were their answers to the question, what kinds of conditions lead them there, and how are those answers translated into public policies or the built environment?

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Bridging the Gap with Linda Tropp

    Air Dates: January 27-February 2, 2020

    Many people today can mock appeals for understanding between partisans with the phrase, “can’t we all just get along?” For Dr. Linda Tropp however, understanding the dynamics of inter-group conflict and facilitating positive dialogue has become her life’s work. 

    Tropp is a professor of social psychology at the University of Massachusetts and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. Her research focuses on expectations and outcomes of intergroup contact, interpretations of intergroup relationships, and responses to prejudice and disadvantage. She has been a visiting scholar at the National Center for Peace and Conflict Studies in New Zealand, the Kurt Lewin Institute in the Netherlands, the Marburg Center for Conflict Studies in Germany, Pontificia Universidad Católica in Chile, the University of California, Berkeley, and the International Graduate College on Conflict and Cooperation, where she taught seminars and workshops on prejudice reduction and intervention.  Tropp has worked with national organizations to present social science evidence in U.S. Supreme Court cases on racial integration, on state and national initiatives to improve interracial relations in schools, and with non-governmental and international organizations to evaluate applied programs designed to reduce racial and ethnic conflict. She received the 2012 Distinguished Academic Outreach Award from the University of Massachusetts Amherst for excellence in the application of scientific knowledge to advance the public good.  She has co-authored and edited several books, including “When Groups Meet: The Dynamics of Intergroup Contact.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Tropp describes her research on how group membership affects how we see and experience our relations with other people.  She says that our perceptions of the world around us are a function of our lived experience, and if we’re accustomed to one way of life, we are prone to think our way is the right way, or the only way.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Spring 2020 Event Series Announced

    The Pell Center has announced its event series for Spring 2020. Tickets to these events are free and will become available approximately two weeks prior to the event date. Please RSVP for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page and call 401-341-2927 or email [email protected] with any questions. Scroll to the bottom of this page to join our email list and stay informed about when tickets become available.

    Please note, all events will take place at the Bazarsky Lecture Hall in the O’Hare Academic Center with the exception of our April 2 event, Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore, which will take place at Ochre Court.


    Film Screening & Discussion: “Midway” followed by Q&A with Dr. William Leeman, Department of History, Salve Regina University

    January 28, 2020, 6:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall, O’Hare Academic Building, Salve Regina University


    The Information Trade: How Tech Companies Act Like Countries & What It Means for Our Democracy

    Dr. Alexis Wichowski, Columbia University

    February 18, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall, O’Hare Academic Building, Salve Regina University


    Multicultural Education Week

    A Conversation with Dr. Cornel West moderated by Dr. Kelli J. Armstrong, President, Salve Regina University Presented by the Offices of Student Engagement & Multicultural Programs and Retention

    February 25, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall, O’Hare Academic Building, Salve Regina University


    Why They Marched: Celebrating the Centennial of Women’s Suffrage in Partnership with the League of Women Voters of Newport County

    Dr. Susan Ware, Historian and Leading Feminist Biographer

    March 3, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall, O’Hare Academic Building, Salve Regina University


    China Rising: The Future of U.S. China Relations

    Panelists:

    Ms. Dorinda Elliott, China Institute.

    Dr. Gary Jefferson, Carl Marks Professor of International Trade and Finance, Brandeis University and renowned specialist on the China economy.

    Ambassador Nicholas Platt, served as ambassador to Pakistan, Philippines, Zambia and high-level diplomat in Canada, China, Hong Kong and Japan. He is the former president of The Asia Society.

    Dr. Lewis Rutherfurd is a pioneer venture capital investor in China and other emerging markets in Asia. He also serves as a consultant to the Pell Center.

    March 10, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall, O’Hare Academic Building


    Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore

    Elizabeth Rush, author – finalists for the Pulitzer-Prize

    April 2, 2020, 6:30 p.m.

    Ochre Court, Salve Regina University

    This event is in partnership with RI Center for the Book. Seating will be limited.


    Fourth Annual John E. McGinty Lecture in History

    Elements of Presidential Leadership

    Dr. Robert Dallek, Professor of History Emeritus, University of California-Los Angeles

    April 23, 2020, 6:30 p.m.

    Location: Bazarsky Lecture Hall, O’Hare Academic Building

    Film Screening & Discussion: “The Newport Bridge: A Rhode Island Icon” followed by Q&A with producers Jamie McGuire and Michelle Abbott

    April 28, 2020, 6:30 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall, O’Hare Academic Building, Salve Regina University

  • The Death of Expertise with Tom Nichols

    Air Dates: January 20-26, 2020

    In a meeting on Capitol Hill 15 years ago, a respected foreign policy analyst said that most national security assessments out of Washington ignored the elephant in the room: the United States and the impact of our domestic politics on the state of the world.  While Tom Nichols wasn’t in the room that day, he brings a rigorous analytical mind steeped in national security to his analysis of the world around us. 

    Nichols is a U.S. Naval War College University Professor, and an adjunct professor at both the U.S. Air Force School of Strategic Force Studies and the Harvard Extension School.  He specializes in Russian affairs, nuclear strategy, NATO issues, and is a nationally-known commentator on U.S. politics and national security.  Nichols was a staff member in the United States Senate, a fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and the Harvard Kennedy School, and previously taught at Dartmouth, La Salle University, and Georgetown.  He is also a five-time undefeated ‘Jeopardy!’ champion, and was noted in the ‘Jeopardy!’ Hall of Fame after his 1994 appearances as one of the all-time best players of the game.  Nichols is the author of The Death of Expertise: The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why it Matters.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Nichols describes the rise of anti-expertise sentiments which he credits with today’s unparalleled access to information.  He says that while technology has helped facilitate global peace through greater connectedness, it has also “flooded us with cheap, easy information that actually confirms us in our biases [and] makes us lazy in seeking better information.”  Nichols says the internet is structured to reward instantaneous opinions, which he adds, “indulges a certain amount of narcissism.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • How to be a Happier Parent with KJ Dell’Antonia

    Air Dates: January 13-19, 2020

    There are some people who believe that they are prepared to critique teachers’ performances because they went to elementary school themselves.  The confidence of what seemed to work for us as individuals fuels a lot of stress for teachers.  The same can be said about parenting.  Nothing saps the confidence of the uninitiated quite like the reality of actually becoming a parent.  KJ Dell’ Antonia however, tells parents to cut themselves some slack. 

    Dell’Antonia is a former New York Times reporter, editor and lead blogger of The Times’ “The Motherlode Blog,” and current Times contributor.  She is the author of the critically acclaimed book, “How to be a Happier Parent: Raising a Family, Having a Life, and Loving (Almost) Every Minute” and the forthcoming novel “The Chicken Sisters.”  Before The Times, she was a Slate XX Factor blogger and a contributor to Slate, where she covered parenting and a broad range of subjects, from legal issues to pop culture. Dell’Antonia is a graduate of Kansas State University, where she earned a bachelor of science degree in business and physical anthropology, and the University of Chicago Law School.  She lives in New Hampshire with her husband and four children.

    This week on “Story in the public Square,” Dell’Antonia says “the secret to being a happier parent is not to always put your kids first.”  “Kids who believe that they come first are actually pretty stressed out kids” because they believe their parents’ happiness depends on them.  She also encourages parents to embrace their adult lives even after having kids, promoting balance within the family.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • “Story in the Public Square” Will Broadcast on SiriusXM P.O.T.U.S. for the Fourth Consecutive Year

    Newport, R.I.—The Pell Center at Salve Regina University will broadcast new, weekly episodes of “Story in the Public Square” for its fourth year on satellite radio provider SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States) channel 124 beginning January 11, 2020.

    Jim Ludes, Executive Director of the Pell Center at Salve Regina University, and G. Wayne Miller, senior staff writer at The Providence Journal, host “Story in the Public Square,” which features spirited conversations with scholars, diplomats, artists, and storytellers of all kinds, to help audiences better understand the stories that shape public life in the United States.

    “Since ‘Story in the Public Square’ launched in 2017, we’ve been blessed to find a home on SiriusXM P.O.T.U.S.,” said Ludes. “This will be our first presidential-election-year on the channel and we are excited to examine the narratives that will be central to the 2020 campaign.”

    “The heart of ‘Story in the Public Square,’ remains our guests,” said Miller. “Whether we’re talking with a mental health professional, an editorial cartoonist, a scholar, or a photographer, we are always amazed at the profound insights and artistry of our guests and grateful for the opportunity to host them.”

    “Story in the Public Square” airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s P.O.T.U.S. channel 124.  Episodes are also broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States.  In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.  A full listing of the national television distribution, is available at this link.  

    Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.  SiriusXM P.O.T.U.S. channel 124 features non-partisan political talk radio. SiriusXM is the world’s largest radio company with more than 34 million subscribers, offering commercial-free music; premier sports talk and live events; comedy; news; exclusive talk and entertainment, and a wide-range of Latin music, sports, and talk programming.

    First published in 1829, The Providence Journal, now owned by Gannett, is the oldest continuously published daily newspaper in the United States.

    For more information about “Story in the Public Square,” please visit http://pellcenter.org/story-in-the-public-square/.

    Upcoming Episodes:

    #401 January 6, 2020

    JAMIE METZL

    The genetics revolution is already reshaping healthcare—and most people see in it the potential for healthier children, healthier adults, and less disease. Jamie Metzl argues that the same technology making progress possible has the potential to saddle the world with a complex array of thorny ethical questions that will affect everything from human sexual reproduction to national security.

    #402 January 13, 2020

    KJ DELL’ANTONIA

    Nothing saps the confidence of the uninitiated quite like the reality of actually becoming a parent.  KJ Dell’Antonia tells parents to cut themselves some slack and to worry less about the many hours each day that teenagers spend on screens.

    #403 January 20, 2020

    TOM NICHOLS

    In this era of “fake news,” disinformation, and social-media distortion and falsehood, professional expertise is under fire.  U.S. Naval War College Professor Tom Nichols, author of The Death of Expertise: The Campaign against Established Knowledge and Why it Matters, explains why these assaults on truth threaten American democracy.

    #404 January 27, 2020

    LINDA TROPP

    On many issues today, Americans are bitterly divided. Many politicians are unwilling to reach across the aisle, and fact-based attempts to bridge these gaps seem to fail. Linda Tropp, award-winning author and professor of social psychology at the University of Massachusetts, argues that face-to face connections and emotion, not data and statistics, can bring disparate groups together.

  • Hacking Darwin: Genetic Engineering and the Future of Humanity with Jamie Metzl

    Air Dates: January 6-12, 2020

    The genetics revolution is already reshaping healthcare—and most people see in it the potential for healthier children, healthier adults, and less disease.  Dr. Jamie Metzl argues that the same technology making progress possible has the potential to saddle the world with a complex array of thorny ethical questions that will affect everything from human sexual reproduction to national security.

    Metzl is a technology and healthcare futurist, geopolitical expert, novelist, entrepreneur, media commentator, and Senior Fellow of the Atlantic Council.  He was appointed to the World Health Organization expert advisory committee on developing global standards for the governance and oversight of human genome editing in 2019.  He currently serves on the Advisory Council to Walmart’s Future of Retail Policy Lab and is a faculty member for Singularity University’s Exponential Medicine conference.  Metzl previously served in the U.S. National Security Council, State Department, Senate Foreign Relations Committee and as a Human Rights Officer for the United Nations in Cambodia.  He has also served as an election monitor in Afghanistan and the Philippines, advised the government of North Korea on the establishment of Special Economic Zones, and is the Honorary Ambassador to North America of the Korean Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy.  Metzl appears regularly on national and international media discussing Asian economic and political issues and his syndicated columns and other writing on Asian affairs, genetics, virtual reality, and other topics are featured regularly in publications around the world.  His most recent book is “Hacking Darwin: Genetic Engineering and the Future of Humanity.”

    On this week’s episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Metzl emphasizes the need for guidelines that will govern human ability to manipulate the genome.  He says the “challenge of this moment” is to find a way to use “our values greatest ethical traditions to guide the application of our most powerful [genetic] technologies.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Convicted and Condemned with Keesha Middlemass

    Air Dates: December 30, 2019-January 5, 2020

    With less than 5 percent of the planet’s population, the United States houses 22 percent of the world’s prisoners. The challenges of navigating that system don’t end when the convicted felon completes his or her sentence.  Keesha Middlemass shines a light on the substantial barriers felons face when they try to reenter society.  

    Dr. Middlemass is a political science professor at Howard University.  She teaches courses in public policy and American Politics and conducts research on race, institutions, public policy, and marginalized populations, focussing specifically on studying prisoner reentry, the politics of punishment, and racial justice.  Her book, “Convicted & Condemned: The Politics and Policies of Prisoner Reentry” examines the public policies that create significant challenges for men and women reentering society after being convicted of a felony.  Middlemass is a member of the Racial Democracy, Crime and Justice Network (RDCJN), a former Andrew Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow on Race, Crime, and Justice at the Vera Institute of Justice in New York City, and a former American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Middlemass describes the maze of legislative regulations that revoke, restrict, or retract public benefits for prisoners re-entering society.  She notes that the United States leads the world in incarceration rates with 1.1 million citizens in the prison system, saying, “[America] has a long history of using incarceration as a form of addressing anyone who violates social norms,” including addiction and mental illness. 

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.