• Examining the Broad Reaches Systemic Racism with Tricia Rose

    Air Dates: September 21-27, 2020

    Americans took to the streets after the murder of George Floyd, rejecting racism in all its forms. Tricia Rose explains that structural racism has a long history in the United States—and so do the efforts to combat it.

    Rose is Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University. She also holds the Chancellor’s Professorship of Africana Studies and serves as the Associate Dean of the Faculty for Special Initiatives. A graduate of Yale and Brown University, Rose authored “Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America,” “Longing to Tell: Black Women Talk about Sexuality and Intimacy,” and “The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk About When We Talk About Hip Hop and Why It Matters.” She sits on the Boards of the Nathan Cummings Foundation, Color of Change, and Black Girls Rock, Inc.. Focusing on issues related to race in America, mass media, structural inequality, popular culture, gender and sexuality and art and social justice, Rose engages widely in scholarly and popular audience settings. She co-hosts the weekly “The Tight Rope” podcast with Dr. Cornel West, covering a range of topics from pop culture and art and music, to the contours of systemic racism, philosophy, the power of Socratic self-examination.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Rose distinguishes between different categories of racism. When referring to systemic, structural racism specifically, she says the vast network of institutions involved creates “a systemic set of forces that produce chronic and adverse outcomes for people of color.” She adds that its systemic nature means “it is not easily resolved by simply fixing one area or fixing a few areas at once in a short-term period of time.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • 2020 Fall Event Series Announced

    The Pell Center is pleased to announce its 2020 fall event series.  Tickets to these events are free and will be available about two weeks prior to the event date.  Please RSVP for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page and call 401-341-2927 or email [email protected] with questions.  Scroll to the bottom of this page to sign up for our email list and be notified when tickets become available.  All events will take place virtually on the Pell Center’s Facebook page at 7:00 p.m. EST/EDT.

     

    The Constitution and Foreign Affairs

    Dr. Anthony C. Arend, Georgetown University

    September 17, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

    In partnership with the Pell Honors Program.

     

    How Did We Get Here? A Conversation with Presidential Historian Robert Dallek

    Dr. Robert Dallek, University of California, Los Angeles

    October 1, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

    This event is made possible by the generous support of the John E. McGinty Fund in History.

     

    COVID-19 and the Fight for Social Justice

    Dr. Faith Mitchell, Intermittent Institute Fellow, Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy and the Health Policy Center

    October 14, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

     

    2020 Election Security: Threats, Strategies, & Solutions

    Panelists:

    Dr. David Mussington, Director of the Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise

    Derek Tisler, Fellow and Counsel, Brennan Center for Justice’s Democracy Program

    Francesca Spidalieri, Senior Fellow, Pell Center

    October 24, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

     

    What’s Next? Discussion of the Election Results

    Panelists:

    Evelyn Farkas, President, Farkas Global Strategies

    David Shuster, Emmy award winning broadcast journalist

    November 10, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

     

    China Rising: The Future of U.S. China Relations

    Panelists:

    Ambassador Nicholas Platt, served as ambassador to Pakistan, Philippines, Zambia and high-level diplomat in Canada, China, Hong Kong and Japan. He is the former president of The Asia Society.

    Dr. Gary Jefferson, Carl Marks Professor of International Trade and Finance, Brandeis University and renowned specialist on the China economy.

    Dr. Lewis Rutherfurd is a pioneer venture capital investor in China and other emerging markets in Asia. He also serves as a consultant to the Pell Center.

    December 8, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

  • Tackling Social Inequality in American Education with Eve Ewing

    Air dates: September 14-20, 2020

    The artist’s role in society is to challenge us, to shine a mirror on our strengths and to expose our weaknesses.  Through a remarkable body of work—poetry, visual arts, rigorous scholarship on race and society, as well as ground breaking work in comic books, Eve Ewing does just that.

    Ewing is an Assistant Professor in the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration.  She is a qualitative sociologist of education whose work is centered around two primary issues.  First, how racism and other large-scale structures of social inequality impact the everyday lives and experiences of young people, and second, the ways public school systems serve to interrupt or perpetuate these social problems, and the role educators, policymakers, families, community members, and young people themselves play in understanding, acknowledging, and disrupting them.  Ewing’s scholarship, community work, and classroom teaching are aimed at expanding the ways that urban school stakeholders, other researchers, and the broader public can be equipped to understand, respond to, and ultimately dismantle white supremacy, and to make school systems institutions of liberation, rather than oppression.  Ewing is the author of “Electric Arches,” which received awards from the Poetry Society of America and the American Library Association and and was named one of the year’s best books by NPR and the Chicago Tribune. She is also author of “Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side,” “1919” and the co-author of “No Blue Memories: The Life of Gwendolyn Brooks.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Ewing recognizes American schools’ failure to teach children about certain aspects of American history and the reinforcement of ideas that uphold white supremacy that result.  She adds however, that “schools are one of the most exciting spaces where there’s an insurgency of education [that extends beyond] formal schooling spaces [through] peer-led and community-led education.”  She says, “there are lots of really incredible teachers, librarians, administrators and community leaders all over the country that are trying to make schools a space of radical possibility right now.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • “Quick Hits” News with David Shuster

    Air Dates: September 7-13, 2020

    Journalists often have a front row seat as history unfolds. Over the last 30 years, David Shuster has witnessed a scandal in Arkansas that reverberated in Washington, the attacks of 911, America’s Wars and every presidential campaign in between.

    Shuster is an Emmy award winning broadcast journalist who is best known for his work at NBC News and MSNBC where he hosted his own news shows and served as the primary backup host for “Countdown with Keith Olbermann” and “Hardball with Chris Matthews.”  Shuster anchored the channel’s prime time coverage of breaking news stories including politics, natural disasters, and the death of Michael Jackson.  As a field correspondent, his assignments included the Iraq war, the selection of a Pope, and Hurricane Katrina.  Shuster was an evening news anchor for Al Jazeera America, where he guided the network’s political coverage.  He most recently served as Anchor and Managing Editor for i24News, where he co-anchored prime time shows with Tal Heinrich.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square” Shuster describes his latest project, “Quick Hits,” a collaborative reporting project that goes “through 12 to 14 top stories across the United States and around the world every day.”  He adds, that he and his fellow reporters, “use the formula that has worked in TV and that is live conversational kind of fast exchanges.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Crafting Stories of Empathy with Paul Tremblay

    Air Dates: August 24-30, 2020

    Empathy is a recurring theme on “Story in the Public Square,” because it is central to the crafting of compelling stories—whether set in fiction or non-fiction.  Paul Tremblay uses empathy to draw readers in to the strange and often terrifying worlds that he imagines. 

    Tremblay is one of the best writers of horror and psychological thrillers today.  He is the author of “The Cabin at the End of the World,” “Disappearance at Devil’s Rock,” “A Head Full of Ghosts,” the crime novels “The Little Sleep and No Sleep ‘Till Wonderland,” and the short story collection, “Growing Things and Other Stories.”  His latest book is “Survivor Song,” set in a pandemic plagued worldHe has won the Bram Stoker, British Fantasy, and Massachusetts Book awards and currently serves a member of the board of directors of the Shirley Jackson Awards.  His essays and short fiction have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Entertainment Weekly online, and numerous years’ best anthologies.  

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Re-envisioning American Heroes with Candace Fleming

    Air Dates: August 17-23, 2020

    If you grew up in a household that prized reading, you probably recall a book from childhood that shaped your view of the world.  Candace Fleming writes those books with an unflinching honesty about the subjects she presents. 

    Candace Fleming is an educator, and speaker and author, who writes both fiction and non-fiction.  She has written more than twenty books for children and young adults, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize honored “Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of the Russian Empire,” Boston Globe/Horn Book Award-winning biography, “The Lincolns,” the bestselling picture book, “Muncha! Muncha! Muncha!,” and the beloved “Boxes for Katje.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Fleming describes the importance of including full stories about notable historical figures in American history in her books.  She says our idea of “American heroes” changes from generation to generation and she hopes to let her young readers decide what a hero is based on their full stories. 

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • From Theodore Roosevelt to Donald Trump: Exploring the Modern Presidency With Robert Dallek

    Air Dates: August 10-16, 2020

    The history of the American presidency is full of accomplishments and compromises, successes and failures.  Robert Dallek argues that the giants from both parties in the last 120 years draw a sharp contrast with the characteristics of the Trump presidency. 

    Robert Dallek is the author of several bestselling presidential histories, including “Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power; An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917–1963,” and the classic two-volume biography of Lyndon Johnson, “Lone Star Rising” and “Flawed Giant.”  His latest book is “How Did We Get Here? From Theodore Roosevelt to Donald Trump.”  Dallek has taught at Columbia, Oxford, UCLA, Boston University, and Dartmouth, and has won the Bancroft Prize, among numerous other awards for scholarship and teaching.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Dallek describes Donald Trump’s presidential election as “a departure from what we traditionally saw in American politics,” referring to Donald Trump’s lack of prior experience with public service.  He said it prompted his exploration of past presidencies and the evolution of public sentiment that facilitated Donald Trump’s rise to the presidency. 

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • The Reign of Beauty Pageants in America With Hillary Levey Friedman

    Air Dates: August 3-9, 2020

    Whether you love them or hate them, beauty pageants continue to play a significant role in American popular culture.  Hillary Levey Friedman argues that their evolution is wrapped up in the history of feminism in the United States. 

    Hilary Levey Friedman is a sociologist and expert on beauty pageants, childhood and parenting, competitive afterschool activities, and popular culture.  She is Visiting Assistant Professor of Education at Brown University.  Her new book, “Here She Is: The Complicated Reign of the Beauty Pageant in America, uses beauty pageants to trace the arc of American feminism from the 1840s to the present.  Her first book, “Playing to Win: Raising Children in a Competitive Culture,” followed families with elementary school-age children involved in chess, dance, and soccer covering the history of the activities, what they mean to parents and children, and implications for inequality and gender in the educational system.  Levey Friedman is the President of the Rhode Island chapter of the National Organization for Women (RI NOW).  She also serves on the Public Policy Committee of the United Way of Rhode Island and is a volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA).  She holds degrees from Harvard University, Princeton University, and the University of Cambridge. 

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Leavy Friedman explores the American beauty pageant’s historic ties to feminism, linking the sashes worn in pageants to the banners that read “votes for women” worn by suffragettes in parades and at public events.  She says, “the sash was co-opted by beauty pageants to show this new phase of women in the public sphere.”  Leavy Friedman goes on to note the “muddled” messaging about women in society surrounding the pageants today.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Pell Center to Debut Virtual Cybersecurity Training at IRS Nationwide Tax Forum

    Newport, RI—For the third-consecutive year, the Pell Center will provide cybersecurity awareness training for tax preparation professionals at the annual IRS Nationwide Tax Forum–this year, in an advanced virtual session on the most pressing cyber threats to both individual tax preparers as well as small to medium-sized businesses (SMBs) in the tax industry. The Pell Center’s presentations are made possible by a generous grant by the American Coalition for Taxpayer Rights (ACTR).  Pell Center Senior Fellow Francesca Spidalieri and Linn Freedman, Chair of the Data Privacy & Cybersecurity Team and Partner at Robinson&Cole, developed the material to help sensitize tax preparation professionals to the most common cyber threats and vulnerabilities in the tax industry and provide strategies and tools to prevent data theft and lessen the likelihood that their businesses will be impacted by other cybercrimes. 

    The coronavirus prompted the Pell Center to quickly adapt its trainings to be held virtually beginning July 28, 2020.  As Senior Fellow Francesca Spidalieri said “the Internet has become the channel for effective human interaction and the primary way we work, connect, and conduct business. Attackers are taking advantage of our increased reliance on digital tools and broader exposure to cyber risks to ramp up schemes to defraud businesses, credulous consumers, and governments at all levels. As cyber criminals continue to evolve their tactics and target individual tax preparation professionals and other SMBs in the tax industry—often considered the “low hanging fruit”—the training we offer is more important than ever to protect taxpayers and strengthen the integrity of the U.S. tax system as a whole.”

    Linn Freedman added that, “tax professionals are prime targets for identity thieves and their clients’ information, including bank and investment accounts, social security numbers, health insurance records, can be a virtual goldmine in the wrong hands. That’s why securing it against a data breach is critical to protect their clients and their business.”

    Past Pell Center cybersecurity seminars hosted at Salve Regina University for tax preparers and CPAs and the ACTR-funded trainings at the annual IRS Tax Forums have been integral contributors to the dramatic reduction in fraudulent tax returns.  Recent data published by the IRS shows that successful public-private partnerships between government tax agencies and private-sector partners have resulted in a reduction of “the number of taxpayers filing affidavits to report [identity theft by] 80%,” and a decline in “the number of confirmed false-identity returns by 68%.”

    The Pell Center’s virtual trainings for tax preparers, both the basic session and the new advanced session are available on the IRS Cybersecurity for Tax Professionals page

  • Appreciating the Obituary with Mo Rocca

    Air Dates: July 27-August 2, 2020

    There are some really great dead people.  Mo Rocca helps us remember them in part through his own appreciation of the obituary. 

    Humorist, journalist and actor Mo Rocca is best known for his off-beat news reports and satirical commentary.  He is a correspondent for CBS Sunday Morning, Rocca and the host of CBS’s series The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation.  The show features stories about some of the world’s greatest inventions—past and present—and the effort it took to create them, educating and inspiring audiences with stories of creativity, hard work, and passion.  Rocca created and hosted the Cooking Channel’s show, My Grandmother’s Ravioli, in which he learned to cook from grandparents across America.  He is also a frequent panelist on NPR’s hit weekly quiz show Wait, Wait…Don’t Tell Me!

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Rocca describes his book, “Mobituaries,” as his “appreciation for someone or something, that didn’t get the send-off it deserved the first time around or any send-off at all.”  He adds, “any good obit writer will tell you that a good obituary is really about someone’s life, not their death.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.