• White Identity Politics with Ashley Jardina

    Air Dates: August 5-11, 2019

    Identity politics are typically associated with marginalized groups—communities that have been defined as “other” by the dominant group in a political culture. Ashley Jardina argues that there is an emerging white-identity politics in American society today. 

    Jardina is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Duke University.  Her book White Identity Politics explores the nature of racial attitudes, the development of group identities, and the way in which these factors influence political preferences and behavior.  She is primarily interested in how Americans respond to increasing diversity, and her current project explores the conditions under which white racial identification and white consciousness among white Americans is a salient and significant predictor of policies, candidates, and attitudes toward racial and ethnic groups.

    In her interview on “Story in the Public Square,” Jardina describes her population of interest as the portion of the American white population whose sense of white ethnic identity is important to them. She says that this segment of whites “are interested in preserving a system of racial inequality because they benefit from it.”  When co-host G. Wayne Miller asked about the source of the ideas behind strong white identity, Jardina explains that for these whites, demographics, among other factors, can trigger fear, saying, “when white people read census projections, they are more likely to…support politicians who they think will protect their group…” and even “become more politically conservative” as a result. 

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • The Power of Story with Danny Strong

    Air Dates: July 29-August 4, 2019

    “Story in the Public Square” began as an annual, academic conference at Salve Regina University.  When we honored Danny Strong with the 2014 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square, his acceptance speech was so moving, so incisive, and so eloquent about the power of story that a public television executive in the audience asked if she could broadcast it.  She did, and the rest is history.

    Danny Strong is one of today’s most prolific TV and big-screen talents with almost 50 acting credits, 11 screenwriting credits, eight producer credits and three directing credits. For screenwriting, he is best known for “Recount,” “Game Change,” Lee Daniels’ “The Butler,” and “Mockingjay,” the two-part “Hunger Games” finale.  Strong is also known for the 2019 TV series “Proven Innocent” and the 2017 film “Rebel in the Rye,” both of which he directed.  His most notable acting roles include appearances as characters on “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” “Gilmore Girls,” “Mad Men,” “Justified,” and “Billions.” He is co-creator and executive producer of the smash-hit “Empire.”

    Strong’s “Game Change,” the 2012 HBO production about the 2008 presidential election, won a Golden Globe, a primetime Emmy, a Writers Guild of America Award, and a Producers Guild of America Award.  Additionally, his 2008 HBO film “Recount,” about the 2000 presidential election, won an Emmy.  Strong has also won an NAACP Image Award for “Empire” and was nominated for a Critics Choice Award and a Golden Globe for the show.

    Strong uses film to tell stories with social impact, as he finds this kind of art to be “the most powerful,” making his work in film “more dynamic [and] thought provoking.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.


  • Nuala Pell Leadership Program Selects Fellows for 2019-2020

    Ten rising juniors and seniors at Salve Regina University have been selected as fellows for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program for 2019-2020.  This innovative leadership development program is run by the Pell Center and is named in honor of the wife of U.S. Senator Claiborne Pell.  The program facilitates leadership development for the twenty-first century through monthly meetings where students will explore leadership theory, ethics, evolution of public issues and what it takes to be a leader in the public sector.  Each student will also shadow a local leader involved in various segments of the public sector and reflect on their experience.  Additionally, the new cohort will travel to Washington D.C. in the spring of 2020 to meet with Congressional leaders, policy makers, and others.

    “It is such a privilege to work with these wonderful students,” said Martha McCann Rose, program director. “I am confident they will continue change the world through public service in their future endeavors.”

    “Mrs. Pell had an unshakeable faith in the students of Salve Regina University to make the world a far better place,” said Jim Ludes, Pell Center executive director.  “When I see the students in this year’s cohort, I find a reason to be optimistic about the future.”

    The 2019-2020 cohort of Nuala Pell Leadership Program fellows include:

    • Ashley Coyago-Crespo, Administration of Justice, Brewster, NY
    • Biance Ferrucci, Psychology, Westbrook, CT
    • Chase Mulvaney, Political Science & Philosophy, Coventry, RI
    • Hannah Grey, Psychology, Plymouth, MA
    • Michael Rosati, Elementary & Special Education, Shelton, CT
    • Brian Durocher, Early Childhood Education, Southington, CT
    • Michaela Dolan, Elementary & Special Education, Greenville, RI
    • Marisa Cipitelli, Administration of Justice, West Bridgewater, MA
    • Caidan Zhouma, English Communications & Business Administration, Portsmouth, RI
    • Kathleen Christ, Religious and Theological Studies, Port Jefferson, NY
  • The Power of Poetry with Maggie Smith

    Air Dates: July 22-28, 2019

    Poems provide readers with frames of reference, a lens through which to see the world. Maggie Smith shares the inspiration, personal experience, and context behind her award-winning poems, including her most-recent collection, Good Bones, which was published to critical acclaim. 

    Smith is the author of three books of poetry: Good Bones (Tupelo Press, 2017); The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison (2015); and Lamp of the Body (Red Hen Press, 2005). Her poems are widely published and anthologized, appearing in many publications, including: Best American Poetry, the New York Times, Tin House, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Virginia Quarterly Review. In 2016 her poem “Good Bones” went viral internationally and has been translated into nearly a dozen languages. Public Radio International called it “the official poem of 2016.”

    Praise for Good Bones: “As if lost in the soft, bewitching world of fairy tale, Maggie Smith conceives and brings forth this metaphysical baedeker, a guidebook for mother and child to lead each other into a hopeful present. Smith’s poems affirm the virtues of humanity: compassion, empathy, and the ability to comfort one another when darkness falls. ‘There is a light,’ she tells us, ‘and the light is good.’” —D.A. Powell

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Editorial Cartoons with Adam Zyglis

    Air Dates: July 15-21, 2019

    Editorial cartoonists occupy the space between writing and drawing—capturing truth and big ideas with seemingly simple illustration and an economy of words.  Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist Adam Zyglis uses evocative images to connect with readers while conveying layers of meaning in a few words.

    Zyglis has produced cartoons for The Buffalo News since 2004. His cartoons are internationally syndicated and have appeared in many publications around the world, including The Washington Post, USA Today, The New York Times and Los Angeles Times.  In 2013, he won the Clifford K. and James T. Berryman Award, given by the National Press Foundation. In 2007, 2011 and 2015 he won a National Headliner Award, sponsored by the Atlantic City Press Club. Additionally, in 2015 Zyglis was awarded the Grambs Aronson Cartooning with a Conscience award and the Pulitzer Prize.

    Zyglis described his liberal arts education, with a major in mathematics and computer science as “training, in a way, for cartooning,” He describes a good cartoon as one where “everything in [it] has a purpose” and layers of meaning, delivering messages using symbols and visual metaphors.

    Some of his award-winning work can be found at this link

    Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.