• Llewellyn King on Story in the Public Square

    Technology vs. Democracy with Llewellyn King

    Air Dates: March 12-17, 2019

    Democracy relies on facts, accurately reported and commonly understood—and journalists play an essential role in building that shared body of knowledge. Llewellyn King argues that technological change is placing great strain on our democratic societies.

    Llewellyn King is the creator, executive producer and host of “White House Chronicle,” a weekly news and public affairs program, airing nationwide on more than 200 PBS and public, educational and government (PEG) access television stations and the commercial AMGTV Network, and worldwide on Voice of America Television. Now in its 20th year on the air, “White House Chronicle” episodes can also be viewed on the program’s website or on Vimeo.

    King’s remarkable career in journalism began in Southern Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe, where he was hired (at age 16) as a foreign correspondent for Time magazine. He also reported from Africa for London’s Daily Express, News Chronicle, and United Press.

    In addition to broadcasting, King writes a weekly column for the InsideSources Syndicate. Previously, his column was distributed by the Hearst-New York Times Syndicate and Knight-Ridder Newspapers. Over the years, King’s insightful reporting and analysis of the energy industry led to frequent guest spots on TV news shows, including NBC’s “Meet the Press” and PBS’s “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer,” and on CNN.

    Story in the Public Square broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Jeff Jackson on Story in the Public Square

    Destroy All Monsters with Jeff Jackson

    Air Dates: March 5 – 10, 2019

    Stories are sometimes told with a particular message for their audiences.  Other times, they are just stories. And in some cases, you can’t tell the difference. Enter the playwright, songwriter and novelist Jeff Jackson, who explores the intersection of fame and violence in a remarkable new novel.

    Jackson is a novelist, playwright, visual artist, and songwriter. His second novel Destroy All Monsters: The Last Rock Novel, was published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in Fall 2018. On publication, it was critically acclaimed by many outlets, including The Washington Post, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Review of Books and Publisher’s Weekly. It is described by the publisher as:

    “An epidemic of violence is sweeping the country: musicians are being murdered onstage in the middle of their sets by members of their audience. Are these random copycat killings, or is something more sinister at work? Has music itself become corrupted in a culture where everything is available, everybody is a “creative,” and attention spans have dwindled to nothing?”

    Jackson lives now in Charlotte, North Carolina, where he has been an adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina, teaching film. In his most recent artistic endeavor, since completing “Destroy All Monsters” Jackson has become a singer and songwriter for the band Julian Calendar, which performs live and has released an album, “Parallel Collage,” available on Spotify and Bandcamp.

    Story in the Public Square broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Alice Robb on Story in the Public Square

    Why We Dream with Alice Robb

    Air Dates: February 26 – March 3, 2019

    Poets, rock stars, authors—and even we mere mortals—all share a nightly sojourn—a temporary stay–in the land of dreams. Alice Robb argues they are not just flights of fancy, but critical to health and happiness in our waking hours too.

    Robb is a science writer whose work has been published in The New Republic where she was a staff writer, The New York Times, The BBC, The Atlantic, among others. She graduated from Oxford with a BA in Archaeology and Anthropology. Her book, Why We Dream, published in November of 2018, is described by Houghton Mifflin:

    “Robb draws on fresh and forgotten research, as well as her experience and that of other dream experts, to show why dreams are vital to our emotional and physical health. She explains how we can remember our dreams better—and why we should. She traces the intricate links between dreaming and creativity, and even offers advice on how we can relish the intense adventure of lucid dreaming for ourselves.”

    Story in the Public Square broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Mike Stanton on Story in the Public Square

    The life of Rocky Marciano with Mike Stanton

    Air Dates: February 19-24, 2019

    There are not a lot of examples of perfection in life—except in the world of sports. On rare and exciting nights, a baseball pitcher can throw a perfect game or a basketball player can have a perfect night shooting. But a perfect career—that’s the rarest of accomplishments. Mike Stanton recounts the life of Rocky Marciano, who finished his heavyweight championship career with a perfect 49 and 0 record.

    Mike Stanton is an associate professor of journalism at the University of Connecticut and the author of the best-selling 2003 book, The Prince of Providence: The True Story of Buddy Cianci, America’s Most Notorious Mayor, Some Wiseguys, and the Feds; and the recent critically acclaimed, Unbeaten: Rocky Marciano’s Fight for Perfection in a Crooked World.

    A long-time investigative reporter for The Providence Journal before leaving to join the UConn faculty, Stanton was a leading member of The Journal team that won the 1994 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting, exposing widespread corruption at the Rhode Island Supreme Court. In 1997, he received the Master Reporter Award, for career achievement, from the New England Society of Newspaper Editors. He has also won prizes from Investigative Reporters and Editors, the American Society of Newspaper Editors, and the Associated Press. He is a graduate of Syracuse University and Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.

    Story in the Public Square broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Jason Rafferty on Story in the Public Square

    Health in the LGBTQ Community with Jason Rafferty

    Air Dates: February 12-17, 2019

    Recently, the Trump administration proposed defining gender as an individual’s assigned sex at birth. But the medical community—including Dr. Jason Rafferty—tells us gender is not so simply expressed.

    Rafferty graduated from Harvard Medical School and obtained post-graduate training through the Triple Board Residency at Brown University. He has additional Masters’ degrees from Harvard University in public health concentrating on Maternal and Child Health, and education focused on adolescent development and psychology.

    Currently, he works in an integrated medical home at Thundermist Health Centers, in the Gender & Sexuality Clinic at Hasbro Children’s Hospital, and the Co-occurring Disorders Program at Emma Pendleton Bradley Hospital. He is involved with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), frequently reviewing policy and publications related to LGBTQ health. He is a member of the Society of Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM) where he sits on the Sexual and Reproductive Health Subcommittee. He is a board member for both Physicians for Reproductive Health and the Partnership for Male Youth. Dr. Rafferty is a 2017 Laughlin Fellow of the American College of Psychiatrists which recognizes graduating trainees deemed likely to make a significant contribution to the field of psychiatry.

    Story in the Public Square broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Karen King on Story in the Public Square

    Untold Stories of Christianity with Karen King

    Air Dates: February 5-10, 2019

    Even for the devout, questions about the earliest history of Christianity can seem lost behind a shroud of history and official church teachings. Karen King traces the power of stories told and untold in the growth of the early church.

    Karen L. King is the Hollis Professor of Divinity at Harvard Divinity School. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Montana and a doctorate from Brown. King was appointed to the Divinity School in 1997 and from 2003 to 2009 served as the Winn Professor of Ecclesiastical History. In October 2009, she became the first woman appointed as the Hollis Professor of Divinity, the oldest endowed chair in the United States (1721).

    Trained in comparative religions and historical studies, she pursues teaching and research specialties in the history of Christianity. Her particular theoretical interests are in discourses of normativity (orthodoxy and heresy), gender studies, and religion and violence.

    Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Rosella Cappella Zielinski on Story in the Public Square

    The Costs of War with Dr. Rosella Cappella Zielinski

    Air Dates: January 5-6, 2018

    The costs of war are measured lives and treasure.  As of the day we produced this episode, 6,979 Americans have lost their lives in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Dr. Rosella Cappella Zielinski warns that the financial costs of these wars have profound meaning for the United States, our politics, and our economy.

    Rosella Cappella Zielinski is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Boston University.  Her research interests include how states economically mobilize for national security requirements and how domestic political and economic considerations influence foreign policy and the persecution of conflict.

    Zielinski is the author of the 2016 book “How States Pay for War,” from Cornell University Press, winner of the 2017 Robert Jervis and Paul Schroeder Best Book Award (International History and Politics Section, American Political Science Association). The book as described by Cornell University Press:

    “Armies fight battles, states fight wars. To focus solely on armies is to neglect the broader story of victory and defeat. Military power stems from an economic base, and without wealth, soldiers cannot be paid, weapons cannot be procured, and food cannot be bought. War finance is among the most consequential decisions any state makes: how a state finances a war affects not only its success on the battlefield but also its economic stability and its leadership tenure. In How States Pay for Wars, Rosella Cappella Zielinski clarifies several critical dynamics lying at the nexus of financial and military policy.”

    In a recent article for Foreign Affairs, “How U.S. Wars Abroad Increase Inequality at Home,” Zielinski argues that changes in how the U.S. finances foreign wars (along with globalization, technology changes, and other factors) has contributed to “staggering” economic inequality in America.

    Zielinski has also contributed to the Costs of War Project at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs with her June 2018 paper: “How Do War Financing Strategies Lead to Inequality? A Brief History from the War of 1812 through the Post-9/11 Wars.”

    Story in the Public Square broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Rethinking Cyber Training

    Rethinking Cyber Training for the Non-Cyber Warrior: Conference Summary and Conclusions

    NEWPORT R.I. – Today the Pell Center released the summary and conclusions from the “Victory Over and Across Domains: Cyber Training for the Non-Cyber Warrior” conference held on September 6-7, 2018 at Salve Regina University. The conference convened an interdisciplinary group of experts from the United States, Australia, France, and Canada to discuss how best to train the non-cyber warfighter to fight in— and through—an increasingly contested and complex battlespace saturated by adversary cyber operations.

    Participants hailed from academia, the military services, the cyber and defense industries, government, and the defense policy community. The conference was held under Chatham House Rule to encourage frank discussions among participants. It sought to address three pressing questions:

    • How should the military train to fight through a contested battlespace?
    • What unique challenges exist when trying to integrate cyber operations with traditional kinetic operations?
    • How can the military and the defense industry best bridge the gap between today’s training technologies and future service needs?

    The intimate interdisciplinary forum provided by Salve Regina University’s Pell Center provided a unique opportunity to address some of the more challenging questions tied to military training, future war, and readiness. Jennifer McArdle, Assistant Professor at Salve Regina University and the conference organizer, stated, “The conference topic could not have been timelier. US competitors and potential adversaries will use cyber operations against US and allied military platforms and systems. All warfighters, not just our cyber mission forces, must be trained to fight in that environment.”

    The conference was generously supported by CAE, a leading defense training company. “Cyber events around the world are increasing in their frequency and intensity,” said Gene Colabatistto, CAE’s Group President, Defense & Security.  “Training our military forces to recognize and counter these events must become a key part of the military’s training syllabus. We anticipate that synthetic environments will play a key role in this training, which is why CAE is continually investing in internal research and development, including new products, so our virtual environments are more immersive and realistic.”

    “The Pell Center exists to bring together people from a multitude of perspectives, including academia, industry, and the military, to solve big challenges,” said Jim Ludes, Vice President for Public Research and Initiatives at Salve Regina University. “For the men and women of the U.S. and allied militaries, that includes thinking critically about how technologies best meet the needs of the warfighter. We were delighted to support this kind of deliberation.”

    Read the full conference summary: “Rethinking Cyber Training for the Non-Cyber Warrior”

     

  • Elizabeth Kolbert 2019 Pell Center Prize Winner

    Elizabeth Kolbert Named 2019 Recipient of the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

    NEWPORT, R.I. – Elizabeth Kolbert, best-selling author and staff writer for The New Yorker, has been named the 2019 recipient of the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square. Awarded annually since 2013, the prize honors a storyteller whose work has significantly influenced the public dialogue.

    Kolbert’s most recent book, “The Sixth Extinction,” a masterpiece of environmental writing, received the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction in 2015 and was selected by The New York Times as one of the 10 best books of the year. Kolbert is also the author of “Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change,” and she edited “The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2009.”

    “It’s a real honor to be receiving the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square,” Kolbert said. “The characters I’ve been writing about in recent years are often the sort that can’t speak for themselves – birds, corals, rhinos, bats. I hope the tales of these creatures – most endangered, some already extinct – have helped people understand that human stories are not the only ones worth attending to.”

    Kolbert will receive the Pell Center Prize during a ceremony, free and open to the public, March 4 at the Pell Center at Salve Regina University. The next day, Kolbert will tape an episode of the Story in the Public Square for public television and SiriusXM Satellite Radio that will be broadcast in the spring.

    “The challenge posed by climate change, by human actions that cause it, and by our collective inaction to tackle it will be the defining, tragic story of the century.  Elizabeth Kolbert is telling the stories we need to hear, now, to understand the consequences we will face in this century,” said Jim Ludes, executive director of the Pell Center.  “It is our hope that in recognizing her, we will help spur further public discussion and action on the threat posed by the changes humanity is forcing on the planet’s environment.”

    “There is no more pressing issue for the country and world than the environment and the devastating impact of burning fossils fuels on species from amphibians to humans,” said G. Wayne Miller, Providence Journal staff writer and Story in the Public Square director. “Elizabeth Kolbert brings us this story like no other, and does it by both sounding alarm and offering hope in her reporting and beautiful prose.”

    Kolbert is the seventh recipient of the Pell Prize. Two-time Pulitzer winner Dana Priest received the inaugural prize in 2013; Emmy-winning screenwriter and actor Danny Strong was the 2014 winner; Lisa Genova, the best-selling author of “Still Alice” and three other novels, was honored in 2015; Pulitzer-winning photographer Javier Manzano won in 2016; filmmaker Daphne Matziaraki, whose documentary “4.1 Miles” was nominated for an Oscar, was honored in 2017; and last year, Pulitzer-winner and New York Time staff writer Dan Barry won.

    Kolbert is also a two-time National Magazine Award winner, and has received a Heinz Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a National Academies communications award. Kolbert is a visiting fellow at the Center for Environmental Studies at Williams College and lives in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

    In a summary posted on Pulitzer.org, publisher Henry Holt described Kolbert’s latest book: “Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs.

    “This time around, the cataclysm is us. In ‘The Sixth Extinction,’ two-time winner of the National Magazine Award and New Yorker writer Elizabeth Kolbert draws on the work of scores of researchers in half a dozen disciplines, accompanying many of them into the field: geologists who study deep ocean cores, botanists who follow the tree line as it climbs up the Andes, marine biologists who dive off the Great Barrier Reef. She introduces us to a dozen species, some already gone, others facing extinction, including the Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino.

    “Through these stories, Kolbert provides a moving account of the disappearances occurring all around us and traces the evolution of extinction as concept, from its first articulation by Georges Cuvier in revolutionary Paris up through the present day. The sixth extinction is likely to be mankind’s most lasting legacy; as Kolbert observes, it compels us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.”

    The March 4 ceremony will begin at 7 p.m. Space is limited and registration is required at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pell-center-prize-for-story-in-the-public-square-tickets-55280102274.

    Founded in February 2012, Story in the Public Square is an initiative to celebrate, study and tell stories that matter. A partnership of the Pell Center and The Providence Journal, a GateHouse Media property, the program sponsors public seminars, discussions and other events; annually names a national story of the year; and produces the eponymous Telly-winning, nationally broadcast weekly program on public television and SiriusXM satellite radio, now in its third year. Find broadcast stations and times in your area at http://bit.ly/2R8px8Z.

    Visit Story in the Public Square at pellcenter.org, follow on Twitter via @pubstory, and like on Facebook at www.facebook.com/StoryInThePublicSquare/.

  • Image from a Fall 2016 Lecture on Pope Francis' encyclical.

    Spring 2019 Event Series Announced

    Today the Pell Center announced the Spring 2019 event series. Tickets to Pell Center events are free and will be available about two weeks prior to the event date. Please RSVP in advance for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page, and call 401-341-2927 email [email protected] with any questions or concerns. Scroll to the bottom of this page to sign up for our email list and stay informed about when tickets become available.

    Please note, most events this spring will take place at the Bazarsky Lecture Hall in the O’Hare Academic Center. The exception is our March 4 event, Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square, and March 25 event, Pell 100, which will take place at the Pell Center.

     

    A Climate A(wake)ening: Responding to the 2018 IPCC Report

    February 6, 2019, 7:00 p.m., Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Panelists:

    Dr. Jameson Chace, Salve Regina University

    Dr. Craig Condella, Salve Regina University

    Dave McLaughlin, Clean Ocean Access

    Richard Tegtmeier, Biology Major, Class of 2019, Salve Regina University

    Eva Touhey, Clean Ocean Access

    Jessica Walsh, Newport Health Equity Zone

     

    Theodore Roosevelt and the Start of the American Century

    February 20, 2019, 7:00 p.m., Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Panelists: Dr. Michael Budd, Dr. William Leeman, Dr. Timothy Neary, Dr. John Quinn, Salve Regina University, Department of History

    Moderator: Jennifer McArdle, Salve Regina University

     

    Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

    March 4, 2019, 7:00 p.m., Pell Center

    Speaker: Elizabeth Kolbert, Pulitzer prize-winning author and journalist

     

    Senator Pell Centennial

    March 25, 2019, 10:00 a.m., Pell Center

    Panelists:

    Sister Therese Antone, Chancellor, Salve Regina University (former President)

    David Evans, former Staff Director, Senate Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities

    Ambassador Peter Galbraith, former Professional Staff Member, Senate Comm. on Foreign Relations

    Thomas Hughes, former Chief of Staff to Sen. Claiborne Pell

    Wayne Miller, Pell Biographer

    John Mulligan, former DC Bureau Chief Providence Journal

    Karen Tramontano, former Legislative Asst. (Labor & Human Resources) to Senator Pell

     

    Current Health Concerns in the LGBTQ+ Community

    April 9, 2019, 7:00 p.m., Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Panelists:

    Dr. Timothy Cavanaugh, Thundermist Community Health Center

    Freeman T. Freeman, MSW/CSW/LCSW

    Melissa H. Manley, Clark University

     

    John E. McGinty Lecture in History  

    The Rise and Fall of Mikhail Gorbachev—and Their Lessons for the Putin Era

    April 25, 2019, 6:30 p.m., Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Speaker: Dr. William Taubman, Bertrand Snell Professor of Political Science Emeritus at Amherst College

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