• Charles Dorn higher education

    Charles Dorn on “Story in the Public Square,” November 4, 2017

    Higher education in the United States is a nearly-$600 billion per year industry that some observers describe as unsustainable and on the verge of a fundamental crisis. Guest, Charles Dorn argues those stories are overblown and that colleges and universities can still serve the common good.

    Charles Dorn is a Professor of Education, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Associate Affirmative Action Officer at Bowdoin College. Professor Dorn’s research into the history of education investigates the civic functions adopted by and ascribed to centers of early childhood education, public elementary and secondary schools, and colleges and universities in the United States. His most recent book, For the Common Good: A New History of Higher Education in the United States, challenges the rhetoric of America’s so-called crisis in higher education by investigating two centuries of college and university history. From the community college to the elite research university―in states from California to Maine―Dorn engages a fundamental question confronted by higher education institutions ever since the nation’s founding: Do colleges and universities contribute to the common good?

    For the Common Good demonstrates how two hundred years of political, economic, and social change prompted transformation among colleges and universities—including the establishment of entirely new kinds of institutions—and refashioned higher education in the United States over time in essential and often vibrant ways.

    Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Abigail Brooks The Ways Women Age

    Abigail Brooks on “Story in the Public Square”

    Air Dates: October 20-21, 2017

    Cosmetic surgery was a $16 billion industry in 2016. Abigail Brooks, says the explosive growth in cosmetic procedures is an outgrowth of deregulation in the healthcare industry, and it’s affecting the way we think about aging.

    Abigail Brooks is the Assistant Professor of Sociology, and the Director of the Women’s Studies Program at Providence College. A few of her many areas of expertise are sociology of gender, sociology of the body and age studies. In her book, The Ways Women Age: Using and Refusing Cosmetic Intervention, Brooks explores what it means to age in the United States.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Pell Center National Cyber Security Awareness Month Champion

    Pell Center Cybersecurity Awareness Month Champion

    On the occasion of the 14th annual National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) – an annual campaign to raise public awareness about the importance of cybersecurity – the Pell Center at Salve Regina University is announcing the Fall 2017 Cybersecurity Event Series, part of its ongoing Rhode Island Corporate Cybersecurity Initiative (RICCI).

    Recognizing the importance of fostering cybersecurity awareness and developing the next generation of cyber-strategic leaders, the Pell Center is supporting this national effort as a NCSAM Champion Organization for the third year in a row and is actively engaging in multiple discussions and initiatives across the country. In addition to various events scheduled for this semester, including lectures, seminars, panel discussions and larger conferences, the Pell National Cyber Security Awareness MonthCenter is posting cybersecurity tips, best practices, and insights on social media throughout the month, and providing businesses and our broader community with tools and resources needed to stay safe online, create a culture of cybersecurity across the entire enterprise, and increase the Nation’s overall resilience in the event of a cyber-incident.

    Cybersecurity must be a shared responsibility since no individual, business, or government entity is immune to cyber risks; none of them is solely responsible for securing their own Internet connectivity and digital assets. All of us have a role to play in securing our critical services, our businesses, and the information we create, store, and process through the devices and networks we use. Individual actions have a collective impact and, if each of us does our part by implementing stronger security practices, adopting better cyber hygiene, and treating cybersecurity as an inherent component of  organization’s policies and processes, we can collectively become a more secure, safer, and resilient digital society. If we work toward this goal – as individuals and as a Nation – together we can realize our full potential in the digital age.

    NCSAM is a coordinated effort of the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center (MSISAC), as well as companies, schools, government and nonprofit organizations around the country. While this awareness campaign has a distinct theme for each week, the overall message of the initiative is to STOP | THINK | CONNECTstop to make sure security measures are in place; think about the implications of our increasingly digital and connected lives and the consequences of our actions and behaviors online; connect and safely enjoy the benefit of the global Internet economy.

    You can join in the conversation by following the @PellCenter on Twitter and on Facebook, and using the official NCSAM hashtag #CyberAware throughout the month. You can also get additional information and resources by visiting STOP | THINK | CONNECT, Stay Safe Online, and the European Cyber Security Month website.

    For more information and to register to our upcoming events, please see the details below:

    •  Panel Discussion: “Real Estate in an Age of Persistent Cyber Threat: A Practical Approach to Managing Cyber Risks” | Tuesday, October 3 |  2:30 – 4:00 PM | Pell Center Ballroom

    During this seminar, a panel of senior leaders and expert practitioners will discuss specific cyber risks to the real estate industry, and address disclosure obligations and notification requirements as well as pre- and post-breach best practices. Panelists will also explore the current state of the cyber insurance market and available coverage to help you navigate this increasingly growing but still very young market.

    This event is specifically dedicated to members of the RI Realtors Association.

    •  Seminar: “Connecting the Boardroom to the Server Room – Current Issues and Practical Guidance”  Wednesday, October 11 | 9:00 – 11:00 AM | Pell Center Ballroom

    Organizations of all sizes and in all sectors are continuing to reinvent themselves for the digital era, creating new models, products, and services. As they embrace technology innovation and adopt new Internet-connected devices, this reinvention changes the tenets of cyber security, expanding the responsibilities of security leaders, C-suites, and boards and creating new risks to manage.

    This seminar will explore different ways to address the cyber security skills gap in various industries and approaches to improve practices and relations between boards of directors and security leaders. The seminar will be followed by a moderated conversation with senior leaders from Lifespan on how good internal relationships can enable organizations to better prevent, respond to, and recover from incidents, and help mitigate cyber-risks.

    RSVP here

    • Workshop: “National Cyber Security Awareness Month – A Practical Approach to Managing and Reducing Cyber Risks” | Monday, October 16 | 4:00 – 6:00 PM | AMICA Headquarter in Lincoln, RI

    Cyber risk is an underrated but all too real threat to organizations of every size, industry, and sector. Whatever your place of business, creating a culture of cyber security is an essential shared responsibility among leadership and all employees. Organizations must view cyber security as an enterprise-wide risk issue and devise plans for employee education, training and awareness that emphasize risk management, security, and resilience. This seminar will provide an overview of both the opportunities and threats of doing business in an era of hyper-mobility and hyper-connectivity, and address different approaches to improve the overall security posture of any organization operating in the digital age.

    The event will feature special remarks by Congressman Jim Langevin (D-RI), Chairman of the US Congressional Cybersecurity Caucus.

    RSVP here

    • Lecture: “The Hacked World Order and Geopolitics of Cyberspace” | Tuesday, October 17 | 7:00 – 8:30 PM | O’Hare Academic Building, Salve Regina University

    For more than 300 years, nation-states dominated international conflict and shaped world order. They used all the instruments they had to make the rules that best served their interests. Two decades ago, digital technologies started to shake up that long-standing system. In 2012, the US government acknowledged that it had used these technologies to disrupt the Iranian nuclear program, and Russia and China conducted massive cyber-espionage operations. Cyberspace became a primary battlefield. To make matters worse, cyber attackers often hide behind proxies. Many of the latest technologies are now in the hands of big companies who have interests that differ from those in government. Almost all our critical infrastructure is vulnerable to attack. How can we understand how states, large and small, attack, surveil, influence, steal from and trade with each other in the digital age?

    This lecture will feature Adam Segal, Ira A. Lipman chair in emerging technologies and national security and director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR).

    RSVP here

    • RI Board of Elections Cybersecurity Summit | Friday, October 20 | Pell Center Ballroom

    This event is specifically dedicated to RI local election officials.

    • Roundtable Discussion: “Opportunities and Risks of Living Online” | Tuesday, October 24 | 11:45 AM – 12:45 PM | Miley Executive Dining Room

    Internet and the use of social media have forever transformed the way people and organizations communicate, work, and play. Today, social media is driving real-time connectivity and communications. Whether you’re of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, or Snapchat, you’re now always “on” and always connected to the Internet. However, the same openness and increased reliance on the Internet that has allowed us and our businesses to prosper, connect across oceans, increase efficiency and productivity, find the next job opportunity or ideal partner, is also exposing us to a growing number of vulnerabilities and opening the door to a wide range of malicious activities from fraud, to online monitoring, data breaches, identity theft, and disruption of service.

    Roundtable discussions are open to students, faculty, and staff at Salve Regina University.

    RSVP to [email protected].

    • Seminar: “Countering Ransomware: Attack Analysis & Lessons Learned” | Wednesday, November 15 |     9:00 – 11:00 AM | Pell Center Ballroom

    During this seminar, Mr. Israel Barak, CISO at CyberReason, will discuss the ransomware epidemic that spread around the world earlier this year and other outbreaks, such as WannaCry and NotPetya, which caused monumental harm to millions of people and organizations worldwide. He will also share a specific case study on a ransomware attack, analyze the business impact, discuss lessons learned and provide practical advice on how to prevent organizations from falling victim to future attacks, such as:

      • Understanding the vulnerabilities that expose organizations to ransomware threats;
      • Learning essential security hygiene practices to protect, prepare and respond to future attacks; and
      • Discovering how to protect legacy systems.
    • Conference: “Is Your Organization Ready for the Blockchain, Bitcoin and Crypto-currencies Revolution?  Wednesday, November 29 | 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM | Pell Center Ballroom

    The blockchain revolution – which is the base for Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies – is set to completely disrupt the way business and transactions are carried out online. Whether you’re in the financial or insurance industries, healthcare, government, retail, and even farming or manufacturing sectors – blockchain technologies promise to revolutionize the way we conduct business and most likely disrupt your field. Are you ready for the disruption? Do you know how to take advantage of these new technologies to benefit your business?

    This conference will address the future of blockchain technologies and their expected impact on different industries and governmental services from world renowned experts from Israel and the U.S.

    RSVP here

    • Conference: “Navigating the Cyber Clause: A Practical Guide to Implementing NIST SP 800-171” Wednesday, December 6 | 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM | Pell Center Ballroom

    This conference will address the new requirements for defense contractors and subcontractors to implement the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication (SP) 800-171, “Protecting Controlled Unclassified Information in Nonfederal Information Systems and Organization,” according to the updated 2016 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS). While there is no single or prescribed way to implement the requirements of NIST SP800-171, companies have only until December 31, 2017 to examine these requirements and figure out whether they need to change any of their company’s policies or processes and/or reconfigure their IT systems.

    A panel of experts, including the author of the NIST SP800-171, Dr. Ron Ross, will discuss how small- and medium-size enterprises with limited information technology or cybersecurity expertise might approach meeting these cybersecurity requirement and ensure that covered defense information processed or stored on their internal information systems and networks is effectively protected.

     

    For additional information, contact Francesca Spidalieri, Pell Center Senior Fellow for Cyber Leadership.

  • Stephen Pimpare on “Story in the Public Square” October 7, 2017

    More than forty million Americans live in poverty today. Guest, Stephen Pimpare, looks at the way the poor and the homeless are portrayed in public life—and it doesn’t match the reality he knows.

    Stephen Pimpare is a professor of the Master in Public Policy program and a Faculty Fellow of the Carsey School of Public Policy. The author of three books and some sixty articles, essays, and reviews on poverty, welfare, and inequality. His second book, A People’s History of Poverty in America, received the Michael Harrington Award from the American Political Science Association, “for a book that demonstrates how scholarship can be used in the struggle for a better world.” His most recent book, published in 2017, is Ghettos, Tramps, and Welfare Queens: Down & Out on the Silver Screen, a history of poverty and homelessness in the movies.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Julian C. Chambliss on “Story in the Public Square” September 30, 2017

    In the August heat, the United States rejoined a battle over the Confederacy, this time, over municipal plans to remove Civil War monuments. Guest Julian Chambliss says the debate is not so much about history, as it is about our collective memory.

    Julian C. Chambliss explores the real and imagined city. From urbanization and planning to comics and popular culture, his research, teaching, and writing explore how perceptions shape policy and action creating our collective urban experience.

    Dr. Chambliss is Professor of History at Rollins College in Winter Park, FL.  He teaches courses in urban history, African-American history, and comic book history in the United States.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Sunshine Menezes on set at "Story in the Public Square" with hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller

    Sunshine Menezes on “Story in the Public Square” September 23, 2017

    Science tells us that Hurricanes Harvey and Irma were stronger because of climate change. That view is politically controversial, even if it is based on sound science. Guest Sunshine Menezes helps scientists communicate more effectively.

    Sunshine Menezes, Ph.D. has served as executive director of the Metcalf Institute at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography (URI GSO) and associate director for communication in the URI GSO Office of Marine Programs since 2006.

    Prior to focusing her communication efforts on improving news coverage of the environment, she developed national and state-level environmental policy, first as a Dean John Knauss National Sea Grant Marine Policy Fellow with Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr. and later as part of a multidisciplinary team at the URI Coastal Resources Center and Rhode Island Sea Grant.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Allan A. Ryan on “Story in the Public Square” September 16, 2017

    The laws of war are intended to protect the innocent as well as combatants. Guest Allan A. Ryan argues they are also intended to provide justice after conflicts end.

    Ryan, a native of Cambridge, Massachusetts, graduated from Dartmouth College and the University of Minnesota Law School magna cum laude, where he was President of the Minnesota Law Review. He served as a captain in the United States Marine Corps and as a law clerk for Justice Byron R. White on the Supreme Court of the United States.

    Ryan practiced law with the firm of Williams & Connolly in Washington and then spent three years as Assistant to the Solicitor General of the United States, representing the United States in cases before the Supreme Court. He is also an adjunct professor of law at Boston College Law School, where he teaches the law of war, and at Harvard University Extension, where he teaches courses on constitutional law.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Jason Healey on “Story in the Public Square’” September 9, 2017

    Information technology has changed nearly everything about modern living: the way we communicate, earn a living, and even how we date.  Guest Jason Healey examines the implications of cybersecurity on war and statecraft.

    Jason Healey is a Senior Research Scholar at Columbia University’s School for International and Public Affairs specializing in cyber conflict, competition and cooperation. Prior to this, he was the founding director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative of the Atlantic Council where he remains a Senior Fellow.  He is the editor of the first history of conflict in cyberspace, A Fierce Domain: Cyber Conflict, 1986 to 2012 and co-authored the book Cyber Security Policy Guidebook by Wiley.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.

  • Photograph of a full crowd intently listening to panelists at the Laudato Si event in Bazarksy Lecture Hall.

    Fall 2017 Lecture Series Announced

    The Pell Center at Salve Regina University has announced a variety of events for the Fall 2017 semester, with topics ranging from U.S. foreign policy to women in science and technology, and many in between. Tickets to Pell Center events are free and open to the public. Please RSVP in advance for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page, and call 401-341-2927 or email [email protected] with any questions or concerns.

    Please note, most events this fall will take place at the Bazarsky Lecture Hall in the O’Hare Academic Center. The exception is our “Conversation with Former President Xanana Gusmão of Timor-Leste” on September 18, 2017, which will be held at 11:00 a.m. in the Young Building.

     

    Great Power Rivalry and U.S. Foreign Policy in the Trump Era

    September 13, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Panelists:

    Dr. Thomas Wright, director of the Center for the United States and Europe and a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy at the Brookings Institution

    Dr. James Goldgeier, Professor of International Relations and served as Dean of the School of International Service at American University

    On September 13th, the Pell Center will host Dr. Thomas Wright and Professor James Goldgeier for a conversation on U.S. foreign policy and great power rivalry in the Trump Era. Thomas Wright is the director of the Center on the United States and Europe and a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy at the Brookings Institution. He is also the author of All Measures Short of War: The Contest for the 21st Century and the Future of American Power, published by Yale University Press earlier this year. All Measures Short of War has been described as a “bracing antidote to simplistic thinking about complex policies,” (Publisher’s Weekly) and as an “immensely useful and lucid analysis of the current global balance of power.” (The Financial Times). Dr. Wright will provide an overview of some of the main themes of his book—the revival of great power competition, and the growing challenges to the international liberal order—before giving his assessment of how the Trump Administration has chosen to navigate this difficult geopolitical environment. Professor James Goldgeier, professor of international relations at American University and visiting senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, will serve as discussant. Dr. Iskander Rehman, senior fellow for international relations at the Pell Center, will moderate the discussion.

     

    Conversation with Former President Xanana Gusmão of Timor-Leste

    September 18, 2017, 11:00 a.m.

    Young Building, Pell Center

    Senator Claiborne Pell invested unprecedented time and energy into ending the military occupation of tiny Timor Leste, helping pave the way for the birth of Asia’s youngest democracy. Pell galvanized Rhode Island’s Portuguese-speaking communities to join him in pressing for change, even holding a Foreign Relations Committee hearing under the dome of the State House in Providence. All the while, the freedom-fighter Xanana Gusmao of Timor Leste was imprisoned in Indonesia, communicating secretly with the resistance and inspiring his fellow Timorese as “Timor Leste’s Nelson Mandela.” Senator Pell would have been proud to see the Timor Leste of today: a peaceful free, thriving democracy.

    In the last two decades, the United States has engaged around the world in trying to seed and support democracies that embrace the international system, the rule of law, and the peaceful resolution of international disputes — nowhere more successfully than in Timor Leste. The results of other American and international efforts have been decidedly mixed—some proving tremendously costly failures, while others have succeeded with little acclaim.

    Today, Timor Leste itself is at a crossroads. The clock is winding down on a novel test of dispute resolution, a first-time effort under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) to settle a maritime boundary dispute not through arbitration, but through mediation. The principals in this dispute are the young democracy of Timor-Leste and its much larger neighbor, Australia.
    Join former Timorese President Xanana Gusmão for remarks and a candid conversation about the challenges of one of the world’s youngest democracies.

     

    Warrior Women: Science and Tech Edition

    Empowering Young Women in National Security

    October 5, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Panelists:

    Dr. Andrea Limbago, Chief Social Scientist, Endgame

    Dr. Elizabeth Prescott, Director Curriculum for Science, Technology, and International Affairs, Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service

    Moderator: Jennifer McArdle, assistant professor in the Department of Administration of Justice and a Fellow in Defense Studies at the American Foreign Policy Council

    Throughout history, cycles of technological innovation have fundamentally altered society, with profound implications for national security. From the rise of artificial intelligence and autonomy, to bioengineering, and the use of cyber and information weapons, new science and technologies change the national security landscape and raise interesting policy dilemmas that the defense and national security community must grapple with.

    This second panel discussion in the Warrior Women series seeks to empower young people—particularly women—to pursue careers in national security. This panel discussion focuses specifically on science and technology careers in national security and is meant to appeal to people with traditional science and technology backgrounds, as well as those with classic liberal arts degrees. The two panelists—one a biologist by training and the other a political scientist—will discuss career opportunities in tech and national security available to young people, hurdles women experience in the field, and strategies for career success. The panel will close with a discussion of some cutting-edge tech and national security issues. A question-and-answer session will follow.

     

    The Hacked World Order and Geopolitics of Cyberspace

    October 17, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Speaker: Adam Segal, Ph.D., Ira A. Lipman Chair in Emerging Technologies Director, Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program Council on Foreign Relations

    For more than 300 years, nation-states dominated international conflict and shaped world order. They used all the instruments they had to make the rules that best served their interests.

    Two decades ago, digital technologies started to shake up that long-standing system. In 2012, the US government acknowledged that it had used these technologies to disrupt the Iranian nuclear program, and Russia and China conducted massive cyber-espionage operations. Cyberspace became a primary battlefield.

    To make matters worse, cyber attackers often hide behind proxies. Many of the latest technologies are now in the hands of big companies who have interests that differ from those in government.  Almost all our critical infrastructure is vulnerable to attack. How can we understand how states, large and small, attack, surveil, influence, steal from and trade with each other in the digital age?

     

    Avoiding a Sea of Fire: Dealing with a Nuclear-Armed North Korea

    November 7, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Speakers:

    Mr. Ankit Panda, Senior Editor at The Diplomat

    Dr. Terence Roehrig is Professor of National Security Affairs, and the Director of the Asia-Pacific Studies Group at the U.S. Naval War College

    Dr. Iskander Rehman, Senior Fellow for International Relations at the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy at Salve Regina University

    In the summer of 2017, the Democratic People’s Republic of North Korea (DPRK) carried out a series of long-range missile tests. The weapon systems tested appeared to be intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), with the potential to range the continental United States. While North Korea has been a nuclear power for over a decade, this latest evolution is something of a turning point and raises a number of difficult questions. How should the United States, its Northeast Asian allies, and the international community writ large, deal with the growing threat posed by a nuclear-armed North Korea? Beyond levying additional economic sanctions, are there any non-kinetic means of persuading or compelling the regime in Pyongyang to arrest its nuclear developments? In early August, U.S. National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster claimed that the U.S. was prepared to wage “preventive war” against North Korea. What might such a grim possibility entail? How might combat operations unfold on the Korean peninsula and what is the state of North Korea’s conventional capabilities? Last but not least, what role might nuclear weapons in the DPRK’s evolving security strategy? How will the maturation of its nuclear deterrent affect its regional behavior?

    On November 7th, in an effort to help provide answers to some of these challenging questions, the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy will convene a panel of distinguished experts.

     

    A Comparative Analysis of Left, Right, and Failed Ethnic Nationalism

    November 29, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

    Bazarsky Lecture Hall

    Speaker: Dr. Cedric de Leon, Associate Professor of Sociology, Tufts University

    The rise of Donald Trump is just one case of a wider phenomenon. To understand contemporary American politics we must place it in comparative context. This presentation will put Trump’s economic nationalism alongside the rise of the BJP in India, the MAS in Bolivia, and the Reform Party in Canada.

  • David K. Jones on the set of "Story in the Public Square."

    David K. Jones on “Story in the Public Square” September 2, 2017

    The politics of the healthcare debate seem to have ground to a halt in Washington—at least for now. But guest David Jones reminds us that the healthcare needs of the public still face substantial challenges.

    Jones is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Law, Policy and Management at Boston University’s School of Public Health. He is Editor-in-Chief of www.PublicHealthPost.org, an online forum for public health policy launched in November 2016. David earned a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in Health Services, Organizations, and Policy. He holds a Master of Arts (MA) in Political Science from the University of Michigan, a Master of Science in Public Health (MSPH) from the University of North Carolina, and a Bachelor of Arts (BA) from McGill University.

    His research examines the politics of health reform and the social determinants of health. Exchange Politics: Opposing Obamacare in Battleground States, his forthcoming book from Oxford University Press, focuses on how states made decisions around what type of health insurance exchange to establish as part of the Affordable Care Act’s implementation. Jones is working on a new book using Photovoice to examine the social determinants of health in the Mississippi Delta, re-tracing Robert Kennedy’s steps in the region.

    “Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET and Sundays at & 12:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

    Story in the Public Square is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter.