Featured Issue

  • “Story in the Public Square” Awarded Bronze for Best Political/Commentary in Television in the 40th Annual Telly Awards

    NEWPORT, RI – “Story in the Public Square” has been awarded bronze for Best Political/Commentary in Television for the 40th Annual Telly Awards. This is the second consecutive Telly Award win for the show. The Telly Awards honor excellence in video and television across all screens as judged by leaders from video platforms, television and streaming networks, agencies, and production companies including Vice, Vimeo, Hearst Digital Media, BuzzFeed, and A&E … Read More

  • The Press and the War in Afghanistan with Katherine A. Brown

    Air Dates: May 20-26, 2019 America’s war in Afghanistan is the longest war in the history of the United States.  Katherine A. Brown served on the staff of the U.S. ambassador there in the years after 9/11 and she argues now that the role of the American press in Afghanistan is essential to understanding the conduct of the war.  Brown is the author of a compelling new book about the … Read More

  • Iran? I’ve seen that movie, too

    On February 15, 1898, the USS Maine was at anchor in Havana Harbor when an explosion sank her killing 260 officers and men.  The so-called Yellow Press—led by William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer— promptly blamed the Spanish government and cried “Remember the Maine!” In truth, historians remain uncertain about what caused the explosion, but the leading theory is that a fire in one of the coal bunkers on board … Read More

  • Leap of Faith: Decision Making Before the Iraq War with Michael Mazarr

    Air Dates: May 13-19, 2019 In 2003, the United States military unleashed a campaign the press had pre-christened “Shock and Awe,” the dominant and overwhelming application of American military power against Saddam Hussein’s Iraq and its military.  Within weeks, U.S. forces controlled all of Iraq, and then the fighting really began.  This week on “Story in the Public Square,” Michael J. Mazarr unravels the decision making that led to what … Read More

  • The Campaign I’d Like to See

    As of this writing, there are 21 declared candidates for the Democratic Party’s nomination for president of the United States. The challenge of breaking through the field and emerging as a major candidate is daunting, but I have a modest proposal: Tell a story.  Tell a story about where we are as a nation.  Tell a story that challenges the narrative advanced by this president and his campaign.  Tell a … Read More

  • Disability Rights with Peter Blanck

    Sixty-one million Americans—that’s 26% of the population—live with some kind of disability.  These are our neighbors, our friends, our co-workers, and our family members.  While the Americans with Disabilities Act has improved the lives of many since it became law nearly three decades ago, Peter Blanck tells us the history and the ongoing challenges for those with disabilities can be stark.  Blanck is University Professor at Syracuse University—an academic rank … Read More

  • It’s Not a Constitutional Crisis

    It’s easy right now to let our worries and anxieties about events in Washington consume us. A quick listen to the talking heads or a glance at some of the opinion pages would lead you to believe that we’re in the midst of a full-blown constitutional crisis.  It’s a thought that I’ve considered on more than one occasion in recent months, largely stemming from the proliferation of congressional investigations into … Read More

  • The World Is NOT Falling Apart, with Michael Cohen and Micah Zenko

    It’s easy to be convinced by talk show hosts, editorial writers, and politicians that American security hangs on the razor’s edge and that the world is more dangerous, now, than it has ever been. Michael Cohen and Micah Zenko remind us that the facts simply don’t match that narrative.  In fact, they tell us, the world has never been better.  Michael A. Cohen, a columnist for the Boston Globe, and … Read More

  • Impeachment and the Lessons of the Iraq War

    Whether or not to impeach the president is going to be the over-riding question in American politics for the rest of Donald Trump’s time in office.  This question is not going to flame out.  It’s here to stay, and history will judge both Democrats and Republicans by how they handle this most serious question facing the republic. So far, Republicans in the Congress remain publicly united behind the president.  Democrats … Read More

  • Human Caused Environmental Catastrophe with Elizabeth Kolbert

    Air Dates: April 22-28, 2019 The fossil record of planet earth tells us that there have been five mass extinctions—the most famous being the fifth that destroyed the dinosaurs. Elizabeth Kolbert warns that we’re in the midst, now, of the sixth extinction and its cause is human activity. Kolbert’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Sixth Extinction, documents the risk to species across the planet. The threat is human activity.  The fabric … Read More