Opinion

  • The Enlightenment is at Stake, Too

    Earlier this week, a friend of mine sent me an article from Inc. magazine predicting that in 2020 liberal arts degrees would be popular among hiring managers.  The basic argument is that technology-heavy industries will need fewer and fewer coders as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning take those jobs first.  The expectation is that AI may be able to write computer programs, but it will have a hard time … Read More

  • 30 Years After the Fall of the Berlin Wall

    Last weekend, I found myself in my kitchen cooking dinner and humming a song from decades ago.  The German rock band “Scorpions” had a global hit in the song “Wind of Change” that may be my favorite “end of the Cold War” song.  I searched for the music video on my phone, and as I watched it, I was reminded that November 9th marks the 30th anniversary of the fall … Read More

  • Heroes

    Growing up, I watched more than my fair share of television.  One of my favorite diversions was a show I caught in syndicated re-runs long after it was out of production. “Baa Baa Black Sheep” was a fictional account of Gregory “Pappy” Boyington, the Marine Corps’ ace of aces in the Second World War, and his squadron, VMF-214—The Black Sheep.  The show got virtually everything wrong in the history of … Read More

  • Individuals of Honor and Good Intent

    When I was in high school, I kept a light-blue three ring binder full of quotes that inspired me.  It went to college with me, and grad school.  It’s moved every time I’ve moved since 1980-something.  At some point, I stopped adding quotes to it—the most recent entry being President George W. Bush’s address to the national prayer breakfast in 2001, not long after 9/11.  I don’t look at the … Read More

  • On Partisans and Truth

    On two separate occasions recently, I’ve heard variations of a critique: “Don’t be partisan,” someone said to me recently when I told him about a talk I’ve been asked to give in Washington next month.  “I’d like to share it, but it’s too partisan,” came from another friend who read a piece I wrote a couple weeks ago about the oath I swore to defend and uphold the Constitution.  In … Read More

  • The Real Meaning of “Deep State”

    One of the proudest moments in my life had no witnesses—at least none that I know personally.  On my very first day working on Capitol Hill, I reported to the Senate personnel office.  I think I was told to go down to complete some paperwork.  I signed a couple of documents, and then a clerk—I remember he wasn’t wearing his suit-coat—told me to raise my right hand.  I did, and … Read More

  • The Responsibility of Citizenship

    We have heard a lot in the last couple of years—and even more in the last couple of days—about the challenge to the Constitution and our free institutions.  With momentum building for impeachment proceedings in the aftermath of the whistleblower complaint against the president, those concerns are rising, again.  The op-ed pages and the cable news channels are going to be full of breathless accounts of malfeasance, corruption, and violations … Read More

  • Not Normal

    People who live in DC and people who don’t live in DC have a different standard of normal. When my wife and I were dating, she lived outside of Boston and I lived in Washington.  She came down a couple of times each month and we’d take in all the city had to offer.  I remember one beautiful afternoon sitting at an out-door table at a restaurant along the Potomac … Read More

  • Empathy not Sympathy

    It seems like the biggest story of the week in the world of sports was the retirement of Indianapolis Colts Quarterback Andrew Luck.  He cited years or injury, rehabilitation, and pain as his reason for retiring and the reaction was both horrifying and affirming.  For some, their hot-take reactions were really only about what his loss would mean for his team.  But others defended Luck’s motives and his right to … Read More

  • A Well-Regulated Militia

    When I worked on the Hill, I was initially amused when Senators would submit a statement to the record about a bill that would pass overwhelmingly.  “Why were they spiking the ball?” I wondered to myself.  I eventually asked a more seasoned colleague who explained it wasn’t about vanity, rather it was about documenting legislative intent.  If there was ever a court challenge or controversy about the bill, the legislative … Read More