Story in the Public Square

  • White Identity Politics with Ashley Jardina

    Air Dates: August 5-11, 2019 Identity politics are typically associated with marginalized groups—communities that have been defined as “other” by the dominant group in a political culture. Ashley Jardina argues that there is an emerging white-identity politics in American society today.  Jardina is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Duke University.  Her book White Identity Politics explores the nature of racial attitudes, the development of group identities, and the … Read More

  • The Power of Story with Danny Strong

    Air Dates: July 29-August 4, 2019 “Story in the Public Square” began as an annual, academic conference at Salve Regina University.  When we honored Danny Strong with the 2014 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square, his acceptance speech was so moving, so incisive, and so eloquent about the power of story that a public television executive in the audience asked if she could broadcast it.  She did, … Read More

  • The Power of Poetry with Maggie Smith

    Air Dates: July 22-28, 2019 Poems provide readers with frames of reference, a lens through which to see the world. Maggie Smith shares the inspiration, personal experience, and context behind her award-winning poems, including her most-recent collection, Good Bones, which was published to critical acclaim.  Smith is the author of three books of poetry: Good Bones (Tupelo Press, 2017); The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison (2015); and Lamp of … Read More

  • Editorial Cartoons with Adam Zyglis

    Air Dates: July 15-21, 2019 Editorial cartoonists occupy the space between writing and drawing—capturing truth and big ideas with seemingly simple illustration and an economy of words.  Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist Adam Zyglis uses evocative images to connect with readers while conveying layers of meaning in a few words. Zyglis has produced cartoons for The Buffalo News since 2004. His cartoons are internationally syndicated and have appeared in many publications … Read More

  • Living with Neurological Disease with Lisa Genova

    Air Dates: July 8-14, 2019 An estimated 5.6 million Americans live with Alzheimer’s today. Another 100,000 are living with ALS—or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Lisa Genova is a brain scientist whose best-selling novels describe not what it’s like to die from these diseases, but what it means to live with them.  Dr. Genova is a Harvard trained neuroscientist who broke into the public’s consciousness with her novel, Still Alice. Likened to … Read More

  • Native American History with Philip Deloria

    Air Dates: July 1-7, 2019 The British colonies in the New World, and later the United States, were built on land taken from native populations. Philip Deloria explores the interplay of Native Americans and the development of America’s national identity. Deloria is the first tenured professor of Native American history in the long history of Harvard University. His first book, Playing Indian (1998), explores the tradition of white Americans dressing … Read More

  • The Impact of Technology on Modern Relationships with Helen Schulman

    Air Dates: June 24-30, 2019 It is almost taken for granted that technology is changing America.  Whether we’re talking about job losses, election meddling, or the role of big-data in healthcare, technology is everywhere.  Helen Schulman, through her remarkable fiction, warns that technology is changing our personal relationships and our families, too.  Schulman, a novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and non-fiction author, is the chair of Fiction for the MFA Creative … Read More

  • Mikhail Gorbachev and the End of the Cold War with William Taubman

    Air Dates: June 17-23, 2019 Mikhail Gorbachev is one of the most important figures of the 20th century.  A child of the Soviet Union, and a fast rising star in the Communist Party, Gorbachev was also a democratizer whose reforms led to the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union.  William Taubman has authored the definitive biography of the last Soviet leader.  William Taubman is … Read More

  • Immigration and America’s Dairy Farms with Julie Keller

    Air Dates: June 10-16, 2019 The super-heated rhetoric over immigration and border security in the United States today is part of a long tradition of anti-immigration hysteria.  Julie Keller puts our recent panic in a sociological context—exploring changes in who works on American dairy farms, and how they traveled from Latin America to farms in the upper-Mid-West.  Julie C. Keller is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of … Read More

  • Local Journalism with Alexandra Watts

    Air Dates: June 3-9, 2019 Local journalism is one of the key-stones of American democracy.  There’s no substitute for an experienced, local reporter—not just to get a story, but to share it with the insight and perspective that only comes from living in the community in which they report.  Alexandra Watts is one of 13 fellows with Report for America, a new effort to put reporters on the ground in … Read More