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“Story in the Public Square”

December 22, 2018: Charles Sennott

Since the era of the French Revolution, commentators and politicians have referred to the press as “The Fourth Estate,” signifying the important (if informal) role of the press in public life. Charles Sennott leads a non-profit news agency extending the power of the press to under-covered corners of the world.

Each week, the Pell Center produces episodes of “Story in the Public Square,” a public affairs television series and podcast. The show features interviews with today’s best print, screen, music and other storytellers about their creative processes and how their stories impact public understanding and policy.

Hosted by Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller, “Story in the Public Square”  aims to study, celebrate, and tell stories that matter. You can listen to the official podcast and download episodes for free on our Story in the Public Square show page as well as on iTunesSpotifyGoogle PlayGoogle PodcastTuneIn, and Stitcher. Subscribe on your favorite platform to get updates on all the latest episodes!

“Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The show is broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link.

“Story in the Public Square” airs on Rhode Island PBS in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.

Recent Episodes

December 15, 2018: 2018 Story of the Year

Every December since 2013, the Pell Center at Salve Regina University has named a “Story of the Year,” the most important narrative in the public life of the United States in the preceding 12 month

December 8, 2018: Luis Martinez

Publically available satellite images offer some of the most fascinating perspectives about life on Earth. Luis Martinez goes one step further and mines those images for the data and stories they contain about some of the world’s most repressive regimes.